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JeanneCrain

Sally Fields…what a doll !

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GOOD-BYE, LITTLE YELLOW BIRD

Lyrics by Charles William Murphy - Music by William Hargreaves

1903

 

The snow was very plentiful,

And crumbs were very few

When a weather-beaten sparrow

Through a mansion window flew.

 

Her eye fell on a golden cage;

A sweet love song she heard,

Sung by a pet canary there, A handsome yellow bird.

He said to her: "Miss Sparrow, I've been struck by Cupid's arrow.

Would you share my cage with me?"

 

She looked up at his castle, with its ribbon and its tassel, and in a plaintive tone said she:

 

"Good-bye, little yellow bird. I'd rather brave the cold

On a leafless tree

Than a prisoner be

In a cage of gold. "

 

The spoiled and petted yellow bird

Could scarce believe it true

That a common sparrow should refuse

A bird with blood so blue.

He told her the advantages

Of riches and of gold.

She answered that her liberties

For gold could not be sold.

 

She said "I must be going."

But he cried "No, no, its snowing, And the wintry winds do blow.

Stay with me, my little dearie,

For without you 'twould be dreary."

But she only sighed "Ah, no."

 

"Good-bye, little yellow bird. I'd gladly mate with you -

I love you, little yellow bird,

But I love my freedom, too.

 

So good-bye, little yellow bird.

I'd rather brave the cold

On a leafless tree

Than a prisoner be

In a cage of gold."

 

 

 

(reading the lyrics for the first time, it occurs to me how uttterly brilliant it was to include this song in DORIAN GRAY.)

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I'll have to report your remark to the Brooklyn Anti-Defamation Society.

 

Ah crap. Now they're gonna come after me with bicycle chains and baseball bats....

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If they were shooting for the facial expressions of a tortilla then Dorian nailed it. I like the way Dorian blackmails Alan Campbell without telling us what it actually is.

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Has a baby been named Dorian since this movie came out? I would think nobody in their right mind would do that to a newborn.

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for those who'd like to see it again:

 

 

 

 

 

LOL. Sorry I missed the film, at least to catch that sequence. after Angela exits, I lose interest in the film...........

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I'm going with team RO here--because I think the director has to take some of the blame here--yes, he's expressionless, but the supporting cast is not.  I think director Lewin is partially to blame--because in Dragon Seed, HHs' debut film, he is Not expressionless and emotionless.  JMO.

 

Edit.  His dialogue just said "I don't want to be at the mercy of my emotions."  HH & someone named Basil said the portrait showed more emotion than HH.  The story, dialogue & direction all require HH to be emotionless.  Again, JMO :)

 

 

 

yes the last time I mentioned how bad I thought Hatfield was in "Dorian Gray" someone copy and pasted a review from I think Bosley Crowther of the New York Times that laid the blame for his performance squarely on the shoulders of the director. I guess it is entirely possible that the director instructed him to be flat and emotionless and two-dimensional. But if he did it was a huge mistake.

 

it is, I think, worth noting that Hatfield made something like three guest appearances on MURDER SHE WROTE, and he and Lansbury were reportedly good friends. So maybe it was just a case of he was a nice guy and a good actor whose career was pretty much ruined by a bad call from a higher up.

 

 

 

Also, read or heard where Hatfield was never happy with his performance as Dorian because of the way he was forced to play it.

 

 

Kid Dabb--I missed the intro, so missed the hosts disagreement--but earlier in the thread, I put at least Some of the blame for Hatfields' performance on the director--I mean seriously, if HH was doing so badly in the role & not fulfilling Director Lewin's wishes, HH would have been fired the first or 2nd week--MGM was in business to make money, #1; making art was a secondary concern (to the studio heads).  I'm surprised Field didn't understand that.  I suppose the Makeup dept.  was doing what they were told by Director Lewin.

 

 

BOTTOM LINE:  "Emotionless" Dorian Gray was 100% on Albert Lewin's direction.  Lewin would stop rolling the cameras once Hurd makes a slight movement on his face (that's what Angela Lansbury said in the Bluray/DVD commentary).  And yes, Hurd didn't like his experience with Dorian Gray because he wanted to give a more emotional performance, but alas the director's power overrides that of the actor's.

 

Hurd was actually a very good actor and was WAY BETTER in a lot of other things he's in (I can make that assessment because I've watched well over 40 things this guy is in).  

 

Also, it took Albert Lewin well over a year to find the Dorian that he was looking for, and end up choosing Hurd Hatfield, so obviously the decision was deliberate.  And Hurd had some sort of emotional fit when he auditioned.  He said his lines and threw the script across the room out of frustration because  he surely thought he wouldn't get the role  and it didn't help that  he  was surrounded by a whole bunch of blond and blue eyed guys (the "true" Dorian Grays) that were better looking than him!  Because of that, Lewin found the Dorian of his vision.

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yes the last time I mentioned how bad I thought Hatfield was in "Dorian Gray" someone copy and pasted a review from I think Bosley Crowther of the New York Times that laid the blame for his performance squarely on the shoulders of the director. I guess it is entirely possible that the director instructed him to be flat and emotionless and two-dimensional. But if he did it was a huge mistake.

 

it is, I think, worth noting that Hatfield made something like three guest appearances on MURDER SHE WROTE, and he and Lansbury were reportedly good friends. So maybe it was just a case of he was a nice guy and a good actor whose career was pretty much ruined by a bad call from a higher up.

 

 

Yes, he made several appearances on that show...........

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Maybe I haven't been paying attention but, I have always been under the impression whatever films were presented as "Essentials" were selected by the guest host - with guidance from Robert Osborne, et al. I don't know where I got that impression, I don't recall having it explained at any point.
 
I mention this because of Sally Field's objection to last evening's presentation of The Portrait of Dorian Gray. Her dislike of this movie - more specifically, Hurd Hatfield's performance - surprised me. I was not expecting that reaction.
 
Negative comments from the hosts are ok - it's just that I was expecting praise as I thought these films were selected because the hosts deemed them "essential" and, therefore, appealing. I'm not saying anything is wrong, I was just a bit confused..

 

 

 

I would think Sally would have chosen the film as I thought that was why the films were being shown. The co-host thought they were "essential"..........RO sometimes disagrees with the choice. Odd to hear the co-host feeling that way........

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BOTTOM LINE:  "Emotionless" Dorian Gray was 100% on Albert Lewin's direction.  Lewin would stop rolling the cameras once Hurd makes a slight movement on his face (that's what Angela Lansbury said in the Bluray/DVD commentary).  And yes, Hurd didn't like his experience with Dorian Gray because he wanted to give a more emotional performance, but alas the director's power overrides that of the actor's.

 

Hurd was actually a very good actor and was WAY BETTER in a lot of other things he's in (I can make that assessment because I've watched well over 40 things this guy is in).  

 

Also, it took Albert Lewin well over a year to find the Dorian that he was looking for, and end up choosing Hurd Hatfield, so obviously the decision was deliberate.  And Hurd had some sort of emotional fit when he auditioned.  He said his lines and threw the script across the room out of frustration because  he surely thought he wouldn't get the role  and it didn't help that  he  was surrounded by a whole bunch of blond and blue eyed guys (the "true" Dorian Grays) that were better looking than him!  Because of that, Lewin found the Dorian of his vision.

I wasn't aware that this guy was in anywhere close to 40 other films, and I thought that his Dorian Gray performance might be to blame for sidetracking his career.

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Has a baby been named Dorian since this movie came out? I would think nobody in their right mind would do that to a newborn.

..but I would think that a guy who looked really young for his age might be nicknamed "Dorian Gray" if he ran with an intellectual crowd. Otherwise, "Baby Face".

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Ah crap. Now they're gonna come after me with bicycle chains and baseball bats....

You keep it up, it'll be switchblades.

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Yes, HURD made several appearances on [MURDER SHE WROTE]...........

 

And the one that I remember (if I remember it correctly, which I don't always) was some HIGH CAMP.

It is set in Jamaica and Jessica runs afoul of A VOODOO CULT.

Yes, a JAMAICAN VOODOO CULT.

Some angry Rastafarian dope smugglers, or the family of a deceased Reggea artist fighting over the will- that I could see, but a VOODOO CULT in Jamaica?

 

Methink you be thinkin a' Haiti, mon.

 

As was the MURDER SHE WROTE policy, the biggest name guest star (or friend of Angie's) gets to be the killer, which meant that Hurd was the killer. He has a big final scene where he is tricked into confessing by a fake ghost.

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And the one that I remember (if I remember it correctly, which I don't always) was some HIGH CAMP.

It is set in Jamaica and Jessica runs afoul of A VOODOO CULT.

Yes, a JAMAICAN VOODOO CULT.

Some angry Rastafarian dope smugglers, or the family of a deceased Reggea artist fighting over the will- that I could see, but a VOODOO CULT in Jamaica?

 

Methink you be thinkin a' Haiti, mon.

 

As was the MURDER SHE WROTE policy, the biggest name guest star (or friend of Angie's) gets to be the killer, which meant that Hurd was the killer. He has a big final scene where he is tricked into confessing by a fake ghost.

Having the name "Hurd" didn't help his career any. It sounds like "t u r d ".

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Having the name "Hurd" didn't help his career any. It sounds like "t u r d "

 

...or even worse, TORd.

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And the one that I remember (if I remember it correctly, which I don't always) was some HIGH CAMP.

It is set in Jamaica and Jessica runs afoul of A VOODOO CULT.

Yes, a JAMAICAN VOODOO CULT.

Some angry Rastafarian dope smugglers, or the family of a deceased Reggea artist fighting over the will- that I could see, but a VOODOO CULT in Jamaica?

 

Methink you be thinkin a' Haiti, mon.

 

As was the MURDER SHE WROTE policy, the biggest name guest star (or friend of Angie's) gets to be the killer, which meant that Hurd was the killer. He has a big final scene where he is tricked into confessing by a fake ghost.

 

 

LOL. Yes, I remember that one. He was in at least one other one. Dunno where that was filmed, but the set designers did a good job on that story.........

 

 

I think the voodoo stuff was a smokescreen for the goings on. :D

 

I think Hurd was the killer in the other episode too.

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LOL. Yes, I remember that one. He was in at least one other episide.

I think Hurd was the killer in the other episode too.

 

According to Wikipedia and IMDB, Hatfield appeared in three episodes of MURDER SHE WROTE.

 

Angie was often like that, looking out for her old friends by giving them gigs on her TV show. That's pretty much the reason why I just love the show to pieces, aside from the ridiculously camp dialogue and situations it's a veritable cavalcade of slightly dimmed stars.

 

and you can always tell who the murderer is, because they are always the "biggest" guest star. Florence Henderson, Van Johnson (twice), Roddy McDowall, Hurd, any of the former cast members of M*A*S*H, maybe even June Allyson: all murderers on MSW.

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According to Wikipedia and IMDB, Hatfield appeared in three episodes of MURDER SHE WROTE.

 

Angie was often like that, looking out for her old friends by giving them gigs on her TV show. That's pretty much the reason why I just love the show to pieces, aside from the ridiculously camp dialogue and situations it's a veritable cavalcade of slightly dimmed stars.

 

and you can always tell who the murderer is, because they are always the "biggest" guest star. Florence Henderson, Van Johnson (twice), Roddy McDowall, Hurd, any of the former cast members of M*A*S*H, maybe even June Allyson: all murderers on MSW.

 

Don't forget noir gal Claire Trevor.   She was the killer as well that Jessica has to bust!     I watch the show fairly often but most of the time I miss the credits.   Even with the Trevor episode it took me a while to match the name with the aged face.   In fact at first she was just another character on the show.   But as I keep hearing her voice I finally said to myself  'ah,  this is someone I know'.   

 

Also,   Cesar Romero and  Stewart Granger were in an episode with Robert Goulet.  What was funny about this one is Romero has a 60th birthday party.    Romero was 77 when he made that episode.    While the guy looked great for his age,  he didn't look 60 in that episode (but he had a much younger wife so I assume that is why they made him so much younger!). 

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According to Wikipedia and IMDB, Hatfield appeared in three episodes of MURDER SHE WROTE.

 

Angie was often like that, looking out for her old friends by giving them gigs on her TV show. That's pretty much the reason why I just love the show to pieces, aside from the ridiculously camp dialogue and situations it's a veritable cavalcade of slightly dimmed stars.

 

and you can always tell who the murderer is, because they are always the "biggest" guest star. Florence Henderson, Van Johnson (twice), Roddy McDowall, Hurd, any of the former cast members of M*A*S*H, maybe even June Allyson: all murderers on MSW.

 

 

LOL. At least in the first half of the shows run. In the later years. elder Hollywood stars were rarely cast. Unsure if that was a demographic decision, a money thing or maybe both.

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It's too bad Sally Fields and Burt Reynold didn't appear together on "Murder She Wrote" with The Ghost Of Jackie Gleason threatening to BBQ their a*s*s in molasses for bootlegging copies of Jessica Fletcher's latest novel.  That woulda been a fun episode!

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It's quite possible that the director was going for creepy when he picked Hatfield to play Dorian, I imagine he didn't want a lot of sympathy for him as he does commit murder and treats women badly. Part of this is the fault of George Sanders who comes off quite well in the movie, at least from an acting perspective.

 

If George Sanders character had a painting though his probably would have looked almost as bad as Dorian's.

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It's too bad Sally Fields and Burt Reynold didn't appear ...

 

Wasn't there a Perry Mason episode, "The Case of the Wandering Ess."

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Also,   Cesar Romeo and  Stewart Granger were in an episode with Robert Goulet.  What was funny about this one is Romeo has a 60th birthday party.    Romeo was 77 when he made that episode.   

 

 

OMG.

I was unaware of the existence of this one. If it ever comes on, I will smother my television set in whipped cream and make love to it.

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LOL. At least in the first half of the shows run. In the later years. elder Hollywood stars were rarely cast. Unsure if that was a demographic decision, a money thing or maybe both.

 

I am ashamed of the fact that I know this.

 

During the evolution of the 12 seasons of MURDER SHE WROTE, Lansbury and Co. constantly fought with CBS over their tinkerings and orders to make the show "younger and more hip" (HAH!- You'd have an easier time making THE LAWRENCE WELK SHOW hip than MURDER SHE WROTE!) Ca. season 6, they actually brought in a guy who had worked to revamp the SPIDERMAN comic book (can't recall his name right now.) to retool the premise.

 

He more or less relocated Jessica to New York City, where she teaches a class at NYU and works closely with the Homicide Dept. of the NYPD. It actually worked, but I think  he moved on after a few years and the show just sort of meandered towards its eventual cancellation, with CBS stupidly moving it opposite FRIENDS on Thursday nights. Lansbury was furious as she still wanted to do it (likely she was a cash cow to her friends and family), but honestly, after 12 seasons and 1,021 bodies- I think the premise was stretched to the point of ludicrousness.

 

To me, the glory days of the show were in its first few seasons, where I like to think of it as Angela Lansbury's Circus of the C-Listers- on any given episode, you can see a roll call of her old MGM buddies and other Hollywood pals- Gloria DeHaven, Julie Adams, Yvonne DeCarlo, the marvelous Marie Windsor, Margaret O'Brien- the list goes on and on.

 

Okay, now I'm going to put on my orthapoedic shoes and crack open a tapioca pudding.

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