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Oscar-winning composer James Horner has died


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It has been confirmed that James Horner has died after a plane registered to him crashed north of Santa Barbara. This comes after speculation late yesterday as to whether or not Horner was flying the plane when it crashed, killing the lone occupant.

 

Horner, 61, received two Academy Awards for his work on the 1997 blockbuster TITANIC. In a career that spanned 35 years, Horner also contributed excellent film scores to many other acclaimed pictures including ALIENS (1986), FIELD OF DREAMS (1989), GLORY (1989), BRAVEHEART (1995), APOLLO 13 (1995), A BEAUTIFUL MIND (2001) and AVATAR (2009).

 

The Hollywood Reporter remembers Horner here: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/james-horner-dead-titanic-composer-804365

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I recently read that he passed away in the crash. His music was so timeless, no matter what film he scored. 

 

The film whose music he is most remembered for- I hope people play in his memory. The world lost a great musician today. 

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James Horner died in a plane crash in CA yesterday:

 

RIP, and thank you for the music..

 

http://variety.com/2015/film/news/james-horner-dead-1201525804/

 

For those who don't like links, the article is here:

 

 

JUNE 22, 2015 | 09:08PM PT

Composer James Horner, who won two Oscars for the music of “Titanic” and scored such other blockbusters as “Avatar,” “Braveheart,” “Apollo 13″ and “A Beautiful Mind,” died Monday in a plane crash in Ventura County, Variety has confirmed. He was 61.

The two-seater single-engine S312 Tucano crashed north of Santa Barbara about 9:30 Monday morning and sparked a brush fire that was extinguished by country fire crews. Horner, a trained pilot, was alone in the plane, which was completely destroyed.

Horner was one of the most popular film composers of the last 30 years, and his “Titanic” soundtrack – with its hit Celine Dion song, “My Heart Will Go On,” written with Will Jennings – became the biggest-selling movie-score album of all time, selling an estimated 30 million units worldwide.

He scored more than 100 films in all and was often in demand for big popcorn movies. Most recent were “The Amazing Spider-Man” and “The Karate Kid” remake, but he also scored “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” “The Perfect Storm,” “Clear and Present Danger,” “Honey I Shrunk the Kids” and “Aliens.”

He was born Aug. 14, 1953 in Los Angeles, the son of production designer Harry Horner. He spent his formative years in London, attending the Royal College of Music, but he returned to L.A. and earned his bachelor’s degree in music at the USC and did post-graduate work at UCLA.

Horner began his career with AFI shorts and low-budget Roger Corman films including “The Lady in Red” and “Battle Beyond the Stars,” quickly graduating to major studio films including “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan” and “Star Trek III: The Search for Spock.” His 1980s output demonstrated his versatility, including scores for “48 Hrs.,” “Cocoon,” “Willow” and “Field of Dreams.”

In the 1990s he added “The Rocketeer,” “Sneakers,” “Patriot Games,” “Legends of the Fall” and “Ransom” to his resume before hitting the jackpot, both financially and awards-wise, with “Titanic.” In addition to his two Oscars, he won song and score Golden Globes for the James Cameron film.

He received eight other Oscar nominations, including seven for the scores of “Aliens,” “Field of Dreams,” “Apollo 13,” “Braveheart,” “A Beautiful Mind,” “House of Sand and Fog” and “Avatar.”

As a songwriter, he earned an Oscar nomination and two 1987 Grammys including Song of the Year for “Somewhere Out There,” written with Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil for the animated film “An American Tail.” He did the “American Tail” sequel “Fievel Goes West” and musically launched another popular animated-film franchise with “The Land Before Time.”

He earned four more Grammys including one for instrumental composition for 1989’s “Glory” and three for “Titanic” including Record of the Year and Song of the Year.

He also scored Michael Jackson’s “Captain EO” theme-park attraction at Disneyland in 1986 and composed music for a handful of TV movies including “A Piano for Mrs. Cimino,” “Extreme Close-Up” and “Freedom Song.”

Horner dabbled in other realms of music-making, including composing new music for Katie Couric’s stint at the “CBS Evening News” in 2006 and, in recent years, classical commissions. In November 2014 he premiered a double concerto for violin and cello in Liverpool, England, and March 2015 saw the premiere of his concerto for four horns in London.

Horner also scored music for an airshow by the Horsemen in 2010.

 

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FIELD OF DREAMS and GLORY (both 1989) are two more recent films which TCM airs with relative frequency. I wouldn't be surprised to see either of them, or another Horner film, included during the year-end TCM Remembers festival.

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I am in mourning.  He was my favorite of the modern composers.  He is now with Tiomkin, Rosza, Bernstein, Goldsmith and the other greats.

 

Nobody has mentioned The Journey of Natty Gann which was my introduction to his work.  His works were varied and always fit the film.  It's sad that we will not be hearing any more but what we have will stand the test of time.   

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Oh wow, this is a shock to read.  Less than two weeks ago I re-watched Wolfen (1981?), once again so moved by the emotional score.  That's when I found out that James Horner was the master behind it.  He made a great movie even better.  RIP, James.

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I am in mourning.  He was my favorite of the modern composers.  He is now with Tiomkin, Rosza, Bernstein, Goldsmith and the other greats.

 

Did each of the "greats" you had mentioned have more than one name? If so, could you post their full names on this page?

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