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film lover 293

Name a movie you feel is moved from ok to memorable by its' musical score

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Haven't seen AG in decades but going strictly from memory there is at least one post '62 song ("All Summer Long" by The Beach Boys over the closing credits) and I'm pretty sure there are others.

 

All the songs within the movie are songs of '62 or previous.

 

'All Summer Long', from 1964, was chosen to play over the closing credits - and immediately following the coda that informs us of what happened to each main character later in life.

 

'All Summer Long', a song that perfectly represents both the era and the end of the movie's narrative as well, was the best possible choice to play at the end of the movie. The song itself is about nostalgia, just as the movie was telling us of an earlier time rather than being in "the present", as is revealed by the coda.

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WIthout reading anyone else's posts (sorry if I repeat), the first one I thought of was The Magnificent Seven -- one of the greatest scores ever for an "ok" movie

 

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WIthout reading anyone else's posts (sorry if I repeat), the first one I thought of was The Magnificent Seven -- one of the greatest scores ever for an "ok" movie

 

Ennio Morricone's scoring of 'Once Upon a Time in the West' is similarly glorious for just a western. Not as rousing as Elmer's main theme, but huge just the same - with three distinct themes recurring throughout the film.

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RayFaiola--will definitely catch ToF on its' July airing on TCM--thanks for the recommendation. :)

 

allthumbs, Richard Kimble, & darkblue--thanks for the triple recommendation of AG, regardless of when the elements of the score was/were released--darkblue's explanation of a coda makes the most sense to me thinking as a director would, matching a 60's song about nostalgia to acknowledge the end of an era of innocence.  IMO, the end of innocence was when Kennedy was assassinated (1963).

 

LonesomePolecat--the double recommendation of TMS just moves it near the front of my must-sees/hears. :)

 

darkblue--another recommendation of Morricone-will have to see/hear OUaTitW--wonder if TCM does "spaghetti western" days? :)

 

 

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Jaws--that mechanical shark would not have seemed nearly so menacing without Williams score:

 

 

 

 

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Although I feel it may have been somewhat "memorable" regardless,  Carmine Coppola's score for THE BLACK STALLION helped a great deal in making it a memorable film.  I STILL lose a bit of breath when that one theme, played a few times in the film, but is also played during the film's end(showing scenes of Reno and the horse frolicing on the beach) .  BEAUTIFUL piece of composition.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Star Wars. Possibly...

 

This video is a bit silly, but does make a point:

 

 

 

Editing plus music can make a huge difference too:

 

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traceyk65--Yes, Jaws is made memorable by John Williams score  Re your 2nd video post :D

 

 

Wonderful--For a moment, I thought Julie Andrews re-edited was for Scary Movie Part VIII-IV?  No matter, great find :P

 

 

On the 1st video of that post--Obi-Wan fighting Darth Vader to the tune of Michael Jackson, then Johnny Cash was So funny--like you said, silly but made an excellent point :P  :P  :P

 

 

Sepiatone--The Black Stallion themes & composition are great :)

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traceyk65--Yes, Jaws is made memorable by John Williams score  Re your 2nd video post :D

 

 

Wonderful--For a moment, I thought Julie Andrews re-edited was for Scary Movie Part VIII-IV?  No matter, great find :P

 

 

On the 1st video of that post--Obi-Wan fighting Darth Vader to the tune of Michael Jackson, then Johnny Cash was So funny--like you said, silly but made an excellent point :P  :P  :P

 

 

Sepiatone--The Black Stallion themes & composition are great :)

It's true--you can completely change the mood of a movie by changing the music.

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EugeniaH--The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) is on this Sunday at midnight--I will be sure to see it--2 of TCM's reviews rhapsodize (sp?) about the music--Rudy Mate is the cinematographer--thank you for the recommendation. :)

 

I'm so glad you'll have the chance to see this - the film is still brilliant even if it had a hip-hop soundtrack! ;)

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The Big Country.  Great score. I love the film. I do know some who don't like this filmbut everyone I know agrees the score is fantastic.

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Ennio Morricone's scoring of 'Once Upon a Time in the West' is similarly glorious for just a western. Not as rousing as Elmer's main theme, but huge just the same - with three distinct themes recurring throughout the film.

 

And speaking of Senor Morricone and his Spaghetti Western themes...

 

Here's a great little rendition of perhaps his most famous score done for "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly"...

 

 

(...enjoy...I did)

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Dargo--the Ukelele take on TGTBATU is actually good, when the performers keep a straight face--to be fair, there is at least one guitar &an small electric guitar (electric ukulele??)--thanks for the video find.

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Dargo--the Ukelele take on TGTBATU is actually good, when the performers keep a straight face--to be fair, there is at least one guitar &an small electric guitar (electric ukulele??)--thanks for the video find.

 

You're welcome, fl293.

 

(...yeah, that was a fun little video, wasn't it)

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The Big Country.  Great score. I love the film. I do know some who don't like this filmbut everyone I know agrees the score is fantastic.

 

TBC is a wonderful film, with an even better score (IMO)

 

And not a name was mentioned...

 

 

Jerome Moross

 

tjavtS4.jpg

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The Mystery of Picasso (1956) by H.G. Clouzot may have been a bit bland without the wonderful Georges Auric score.

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Bogie56--take a look at the names on the credits of this documentary--Picasso (the paintings in the film were destroyed(?!!?) once filming was completed, don't ask me why--the cinematography was by a Claude Renoir--as best I can tell, TCM aired this documentary once, in 2007, & hasn't shown it since.  Thanks for pointing out a movie I didn't know existed!

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Jaws--that mechanical shark would not have seemed nearly so menacing without Williams score:

I think John Williams improves all his movies -- in the case of the previously mentioned STAR WARS, I feel like the score makes the film seem grander, fuller, and more expensive. In other words, it legitimizes it.

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It's hard to imagine Koyaanisqatsi without the Phillip Glass score.

 

When I saw Dracula (1931) with the new Glass score it really game it a new dimension and made Lugosi's performance all that more hypnotic.

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Although his scores are chock full of borrowed songs, Martin Scorcese's films, especially his crime sagas are always enhanced by his selections.  Some have become nearly synonymous with the film such as Mascagni's "Intermezzo from Cavalleria rusticana" in Raging Bull, and every time I hear "Layla", I think of Goodfellas.

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Although his scores are chock full of borrowed songs, Martin Scorcese's films, especially his crime sagas are always enhanced by his selections.  Some have become nearly synonymous with the film such as Mascagni's "Intermezzo from Cavalleria rusticana" in Raging Bull, and every time I hear "Layla", I think of Goodfellas.

Fully concur about Raging Bull being richly enhanced by that operatic score but since, by my lights, RB is far better than just OK, well, then, hmmmm . . .  Within strict guidelines of this challenge, not much comes to mind! Well . . . maybe Arthur Penn's, some might say, unfairly abused Mickey One?  The jazz score composed by a former arranger/pianist for the Goodman Band, Eddie Sauter with Stan Getz on tenor--whoa. That music is so supreme that I'm sure it must benevolently short-circuit my head so that I can detect nothing at all from the "pretentiousness" others seem to find in the film itself as a whole.

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**** Chung's score of To Live and Die in L.A. (1985) heightened the danger, excitement and tension in that film to new levels.

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