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Name The Film Favourites Of Which You Can Do A Brain Re-Play Any Time


TomJH
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These are the film favourites that are so thoroughly embedded in your memory that you never really have to watch them again.

 

In other words, if you were abandoned on a desert island without any power or (God forbid) a DVD player, you could close your eyes and replay these films in your mind with ease. (It might be handy, under these circumstances, if you could replay a Robinson Crusoe film for practical reasons).

 

It's probably been at least 15 years since I've seen either King Kong (the original) or The Wizard of Oz, for example. Yet I could easily do a brain replay of either film, including most of the dialogue, musical cues and subtle facial responses, if I wanted to, because I know both films so well based after countless viewings of them in the past.

 

I could do that same brain re-play anytime with so many other films, too, all favourites of mine (they'd have to be since I've seen them so often in order to know them so well). White Heat. The Adventures of Robin Hood. Ghost Breakers. Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, among so many others. All of these are, coincidence or not, films I grew up with on television.

 

So what are the films you can brain re-play anytime?

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For me:

 

"Singin' in the Rain" (1952)--up to where Lina is tripped up by a hidden microphone cord. :)

 

"The Bandwagon"(1953)--coming on soon--can't miss my 15th viewing ;)

 

"The Pirate"--(1948)--have seen at least 10 times--have the "demolition"scene memorized.

 

"Gilda"--(1946)

 

"Butterfield 8"--(1960) ET plays THE party girl--& got an Oscar for it!!

 

Edit: "The Bandwagon" (1953) had to have been scheduled because of the noir parody "The Girl Hunt Ballet"--one of MGM's top 5 musical numbers ever, IMO.  :)

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I'll bite:

 

KING KONG (old one)

 

Too many Laurel & Hardy shorts to list here

 

And, me too,

WIZARD OF OZ

 

GRAPES OF WRATH

 

(Not really intending to list these chronologically)

 

CASABLANCA

 

MALTESE FALCON

 

IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE

 

REAR WINDOW

 

HARVEY

 

ON THE WATERFRONT

 

THE WILD ONE

 

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

 

THE BELLBOY (sorry.  I HAVE no pretentious dislike of Jerry Lewis)

 

A HARD DAY'S NIGHT

 

THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE

 

MR. HOBBS TAKES A VACATION

 

LILIES OF THE FIELD

 

I'll stop here, as I see an OASIS coming up!  :lol:

 

 

Sepiatone

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In this order:

 

A Christmas Carol (1951)

The Great Escape (1963)

Dr. Strangelove (1964)

The Wizard of Oz (1939)

2001 A Space Odyssey (1968)

A Night at the Opera (1935)

Paths of Glory (1957)

Casablanca (1942)

Bedazzled (1967)

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

Slaughterhouse Five (1972)

Lolita (1962)

Touch of Evil (1958)

The Magnificent Seven (1960)

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)

Play It Again, Sam (1971)

Bananas (1971)

Planet of the Apes (1968)

The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)

Abbott and Costello meet Frankenstein (1948)

Last Tango In Paris (1972)

 

...stopping at films I've seen 10 times or more

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34d8af22-d051-4e9e-b68c-d01cb5f77627_zps

 

"You despise me, don't you, Rick?"

 

"If I gave  you any thought I probably would."

 

Yes, for sure this film I can also replay any time in my mind, as well as Bogart's Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Dark Passage and African Queen.

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I've seen all these movies a number of times, esp. the first 7 films.  

 

     EVILSPEAK (1981)

     GAS (1981)

     SCAVENGER HUNT (1979)

     SECRET OF NIMH, The (1982-Animated)    

     BULLITT (1968)

     IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT (1967)

     BEAST WITHIN, The (1982)

     -----------------------------------------------

     FUNERAL HOME (1980-Canadian)

     POSSESSION OF VIRGINIA, The (1972-Canadian) (English-dubbed version)

     RABID (1977-Canadian)

     DARK NIGHT OF THE SCARECROW (1981-Tvm)

     TRACKDOWN (1976)

     SUMMER SCHOOL (1978) (original title:  "Mag Wheels")  This contains the immortal "Anita Song".

     GAUNTLET, The (1977) 

     SUMMER SCHOOL (1979) 

     TEACHER, The (1974)

     OUTFIT, The (1973) 

     WHITE LIGHTNING (1973)

     GATOR (1976)

     JAWS (1975)

     EXECUTIONER, The (1970)

     DEADLY BEES, The (1967-UK)  Beeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeees!!!

     BLOOD ON SATAN'S CLAW, The (1970-UK)  Linda Hayden as the sinister 'Angel Blake'. 

    

     Pretty soon I will have seen "SINGIN' IN THE RAIN" and "NORTH BY NORTHWEST" enough times to know them thoroughly.  Seems every time they air on TCM I'm always glad to watch them.  Like a movie version of 'comfort food'. 

 

     My abandoned desert island has a VCR; I have all the movies listed above on tape. 

 

    I can go over lines from "GAS" in my fertile brain. 

 

    Italian pet mortician #1:  "I want a valve right there" (pointing)

 

    Auto mechanic:  "You guys are crazy; that's a live line!"

 

    It. pet mortician #2:  "Do you wanna look like crisp pizza?" (brandishing a blow torch)

 

    Auto mechanic:  "You're gonna look like mozzarella marinara if you don't put that away!"

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These are just some, there are alot more

 

The Godfather 1 and 2

Goodfellas

The Razor's Edge

From Here to Eternity

All About Eve

Now Voyager

Friendly Persuasion

The Searchers

The Magnificent Seven

Mildred Pierce

Laura

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

Leave Her To Heaven

The Bandwagon

Singin' In the Rain

Baby Face

White Heat

Casablanca

The Roaring Twenties

The Wizard of Oz

The Adventures of Robin Hood

How To Marry A Millionaire

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

The Thomas Crown Affair (McQueen version)

Rear Window

The Man Who Knew Too Much (Stewart, Day version)

The Birds

Shadow of A Doubt

Splendor In The Grass

Thin Man Films

Miracle on 34th Street

It's A Wonderful Life

Christmas In Connecticut

Frankenstein

The Bride of Frankenstein

The Invisible Man

 

And that's just the beginning 

 

 

 

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Not being funny here, I am agog and otherwise astonished beyond the pale to know that some of you can actually brain-play movies in their entirety. Dialogue too? Are some of you fudging, perhaps just a little. It's not an easy thing to do to get everything right ... is it? I'm not being cynical, I truly admire those who can do that.

 

I can't do that with even one movie, not even close. But I am holding myself to the highest possible standard, no mistakes, actually I don't come close enough to even apply the ultimate standard.

 

Not to sound uppity, but I can do that with certain classical music pieces as I have been listening for decades, some of which are quite long and intricate. Even then I get confused sometimes. If I tune in a classical music radio station or just surprise upon a piece in a movie or something, I often know what it is withing a matter of seconds and often immediately.

 

You see, I have to brag a little regarding the music because I am woefully inadequate with the movie thing.

 

How many times does one need to see a movie to accomplish this colossal feat?

 

Please excuse me while I go somewhere and pout.

 

laffite

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lafitte--am as astonished as you at the # of films others can replay from memory but when TCM repeats so many films so many times--two more viewings & I'll have Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) & North By Northwest (1959) memorized (have seen films 14 & 13 times, respectively).

 

But seriously,  in the musicals I noted I can run the musical numbers forwards & backwards through my head--TCM repeating certain films helps enormously--same with Gilda (1946).

 

Re Butterfield 8 (1960)--That one's such a howler--there's only one I can partially quote--Elizabeth Taylor (ET)  to long suffering, dim mother Mildred Dunnock--"Oh Mama!  I was the s**t of All Time!  And the bar scene where ET grinds her 5(?) inch stiletto heel into Laurence Harvey's shoe--camp delight! ET didn't take it seriously--& neither do I

 

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The Wizard of Oz

Gone With The Wind

Laura

Crossfire

In This Our Life

The Heiress

The Mad Miss Manton

The Thin Man

After the Thin Man

The Shop Around the Corner

That Forsythe Woman

The Adventures of Robin Hood

The Americanization of Emily

Bachelor in Paradise

The Philadelphia Story

People Will Talk

Mourning Becomes Electra

Dirty Dancing....

 

and that's just the beginning of very long list.

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The Wizard of Oz

Gone With The Wind

Laura

Crossfire

In This Our Life

The Heiress

The Mad Miss Manton

The Thin Man

After the Thin Man

The Shop Around the Corner

That Forsythe Woman

The Adventures of Robin Hood

The Americanization of Emily

Bachelor in Paradise

The Philadelphia Story

People Will Talk

Mourning Becomes Electra

Dirty Dancing....

 

and that's just the beginning of very long list.

 

I'm not sure I would want to have Mourning Becomes Electra in my brain replay list.    That would be like having Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf in my brain.     ;)   

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Not being funny here, I am agog and otherwise astonished beyond the pale to know that some of you can actually brain-play movies in their entirety. Dialogue too? Are some of you fudging, perhaps just a little. It's not an easy thing to do to get everything right ... is it? I'm not being cynical, I truly admire those who can do that.

 

 

The 3 I listed I can do, verbatim

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I'm not sure I would want to have Mourning Becomes Electra in my brain replay list.    That would be like having Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf in my brain.        

 

 

I actually can recite a lot of the dialogue of WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?

Edward Albee's wiriting is brilliant.

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The Wizard of Oz

Gone With The Wind

Laura

Crossfire

In This Our Life

The Heiress

The Mad Miss Manton

The Thin Man

After the Thin Man

The Shop Around the Corner

That Forsythe Woman

The Adventures of Robin Hood

The Americanization of Emily

Bachelor in Paradise

The Philadelphia Story

People Will Talk

Mourning Becomes Electra

Dirty Dancing....

 

and that's just the beginning of very long list.

 

Karmagirl, you must have a photographic memory. So if I picked say, "The Philadelphia Story" you could initiate a brain-play reading and perhaps give us a long post on same (without research of course, remember, you're on a desert island). If so, please let us know in advance so I can my popcorn ready. If you do a double feature, let us know so I can get two bags of popcorn.

 

;)

;)

;)

 

laffite

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Jean Laffite ze Pirate:  If you fancy asking me a question about any of those first 7 movies on my list I'll do my best to give you an accurate answer.   :)

 

     I don't mind a challenge.   

 

     I should add 'Breakheart Pass' to my list; I've seen that a number of times as well. 

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Jean Laffite ze Pirate:  If you fancy asking me a question about any of those first 7 movies on my list I'll do my best to give you an accurate answer.   :)

 

     I don't mind a challenge.   

 

     I should add 'Breakheart Pass' to my list; I've seen that a number of times as well. 

 

Mais attendez, Monsieur Gorman, this is not about just asking questions, this is about rolling out a brain-play, n'est-ce pas? If you're brain were a computer we would be able to download the narrative beginning with the Lion roaring and continuing with scenery, dialogue, music, and facial expressions, in the exact order that would appear in a movie theater, beginning to end. But since your brain is not a computer, the challenge is to do it quite mindfully on cue. If anyone could actually do that with a movie of their choice, I would be most astonished and full of undying admiration.

 

(I'm not officially issuing a challenge here, just sayin')

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Not being funny here, I am agog and otherwise astonished beyond the pale to know that some of you can actually brain-play movies in their entirety. Dialogue too? Are some of you fudging, perhaps just a little. It's not an easy thing to do to get everything right ... is it? I'm not being cynical, I truly admire those who can do that.

 

I can't do that with even one movie, not even close. But I am holding myself to the highest possible standard, no mistakes, actually I don't come close enough to even apply the ultimate standard.

 

Not to sound uppity, but I can do that with certain classical music pieces as I have been listening for decades, some of which are quite long and intricate. Even then I get confused sometimes. If I tune in a classical music radio station or just surprise upon a piece in a movie or something, I often know what it is withing a matter of seconds and often immediately.

 

You see, I have to brag a little regarding the music because I am woefully inadequate with the movie thing.

 

How many times does one need to see a movie to accomplish this colossal feat?

 

Please excuse me while I go somewhere and pout.

 

laffite

 

That reminds me of a guy in the 80s who could look at the grooves of a vinyl record and, without playing it, tell which piece of classical music it was, and sometimes even which performance it was.

 

http://www.tonedeaf.com.au/362661/vinyl-vision-meet-the-man-who-can-identify-a-record-by-its-grooves.htm

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That reminds me of a guy in the 80s who could look at the grooves of a vinyl record and, without playing it, tell which piece of classical music it was, and sometimes even which performance it was.

 

http://www.tonedeaf.com.au/362661/vinyl-vision-meet-the-man-who-can-identify-a-record-by-its-grooves.htm

 

I read the article and the method makes sense though I would wonder what his degree of accuracy is. We all remember that the grooves did look different depending whether the music was loud or not. This is probably much more apparent in classical music because of the variables in dynamics (volume) as opposed to other music genres. Identifying the symphony orchestra and/or conductor came (as the articles said) from his knowledge of what artists performed on what labels, which could be quite constant but would not provide absolute certainty, so there would have to be an educated guess factor IMO. Leonard Bernstein, for instance, performed with different labels and with different orchestras in his long career. I can't be help be a little skeptical since there are so many different famous pieces. Again, I would like to know his degree of success, certainly not 100%, but probably impressive, unless the article is a fraud, which it probably isn't. 

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I read the article and the method makes sense though I would wonder what his degree of accuracy is. We all remember that the grooves did look different depending whether the music was loud or not. This is probably much more apparent in classical music because of the variables in dynamics (volume) as opposed to other music genres. Identifying the symphony orchestra and/or conductor came (as the articles said) from his knowledge of what artists performed on what labels, which could be quite constant but would not provide absolute certainty, so there would have to be an educated guess factor IMO. Leonard Bernstein, for instance, performed with different labels and with different orchestras in his long career. I can't be help be a little skeptical since there are so many different famous pieces. Again, I would like to know his degree of success, certainly not 100%, but probably impressive, unless the article is a fraud, which it probably isn't. 

 

I remember seeing them feature him on the TV show "That's Incredible!", as the article says in '82, which I'll go with.  It is one of those memories that has stuck with me all these years.  There is some footage of that TV show on Youtube, but I didn't dig deep enough to see if his segment was there or not.

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These are just some, there are alot more

 

The Godfather 1 and 2

Goodfellas

The Razor's Edge

From Here to Eternity

All About Eve

Now Voyager

Friendly Persuasion

The Searchers

The Magnificent Seven

Mildred Pierce

Laura

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

Leave Her To Heaven

The Bandwagon

Singin' In the Rain

Baby Face

White Heat

Casablanca

The Roaring Twenties

The Wizard of Oz

The Adventures of Robin Hood

How To Marry A Millionaire

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

The Thomas Crown Affair (McQueen version)

Rear Window

The Man Who Knew Too Much (Stewart, Day version)

The Birds

Shadow of A Doubt

Splendor In The Grass

Thin Man Films

Miracle on 34th Street

It's A Wonderful Life

Christmas In Connecticut

Frankenstein

The Bride of Frankenstein

The Invisible Man

 

And that's just the beginning 

If I ever have the pleasure of meeting you on a TCM cruise and the ship runs aground, I hope to be in your company!

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