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Daily Dose of Darkness #22: It's in the Bag (Opening Scene of Too Late for Tears)


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Continuing our theme of "Film Noir in the Postwar Era" discuss today's opening scene from Too Late for Tears! This is the Daily Dose for Tuesday, July 14, and will be delivered by email Tuesday morning by TCM. 

 

If you don't get the email, you can access today's Daily Dose on Canvas through the following link: https://learn.canvas.net/courses/748/pages/daily-dose-of-darkness-number-22-july-14-2015

 

Let the discussions begin!

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To begin with, my favorite moment of (unintentional?) humor:

 

She says: "I just can't take another night being patronized."

He says: "Patronized? Oh, sweetheart."

 

Anyway: I haven't seen this movie, but I think that it's kind of a shame that she seems to be setting up as your typical greedy wife. Maybe I'm wrong. But all her comments about the wife being "diamond crusted" and the house overlooking everyone else, and the way that her eyes light up when she sees the cash make it feel like this is basically a fisherman's wife kind of story. She wants more and more and it will cost them everything. Part of why I think it's a shame is that I LOVED her wicked little smile as she literally takes the wheel and out-drives the man chasing them. I feel like her greed is going to become the focal point, which is too bad because it's kind of well-worn territory. The people who were exchanging the money are probably up to no good, so I just have to wonder how it's all going to play out. But it would be awesome if she became enamored with the intrigue and adventure of it all instead of just being money-crazy.

 

It's interesting that the main focus seems like it will be on a (relatively normal) husband and wife. No woman and her lover. No private eye and the femme fatale. Two people who are in an established relationship. I feel like that's a rarity in the movies we've been studying.

 

I also have to wonder if that relative normalcy is part of a shift in how people are perceiving crime. These are normal people getting sucked into something really dark. Just like the normal guys picking up a man in The Hitch-Hiker. Crime is literally being dropped into their laps. And the scary thing is that it's going to change them for the worse. It's the kind of movie opening that makes you wonder "What would I do?". The money is in their hands without them making any choices--circumstances have placed them in an extreme spot without them being at all proactive.

 

It's also interesting to note that this is one plot that hasn't changed: large sum of (ill-gotten) money falls into laps of normal folks. It's the plot of such thrillers as Shallow Grave and A Simple Plan. I think it's so compelling because it's a temptation that would be hard to pass up and we know it.

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While watching this clip I was thinking of the story from the husband's perspective, perhaps a recently returned vet finding out things about his wife he hasn't known before, that she's got a huge inferiority problem and a big hole inside her that she has to fill with money or acquisitions to make herself feel as rich or important as other people. When she sees the bag full of money, she sees that as her big chance, practically leaving her husband by the side of the road, and when careening down the hillside it seems like she's enjoying it because she's taking control of the situation, taking the masculine role of driving the car much like when Barbara Stanwyck is seen wearing pants after she has Fred MacMurray in her power in Double Indemnity. At the end of the scene, Arthur Kennedy wants to take the wheel again but of course, at that point, it's too late. Obviously, fate had something to do with them being in the right place at the right time, but it was her feelings of inferiority  that caused her to wrestle with her husband over the wheel and blink the lights - almost like she was drawing the money to her, like she had this need, this black hole inside that sucked it in. Perhaps this type of story appealed to audiences at that time because when you see people trying to take a short cut to the American dream, you as the viewer - as another person trying to reach that dream and finding it hard to attain-get to see them punished for it. You may even suspect that people you know have gotten away with taking such shortcuts, and it's a relief and a catharsis to see those deeds go punished for a change. The bottom line is, you just can't chisel yourself a piece of the American dream, and if you try to, you'll either find yourself face-down in a gutter somewhere or (spoiler alert!) falling off a balcony amid a toxic rain of your ill-gotten loot!

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A bag of money falls from one car into another, or is tossed. A contrivance? Yes, but it's a mild annoyance, not a roadblock, because when you see a car headed your way moments later, its headlights blinking, your pulse quickens, and you know a great ride has just begun -- with the woman behind the wheel taking charge, skillfully eluding danger.

 

Without question, more twists and frightening turns are yet to come.

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I just saw this film a few weeks ago. Quite amusing because the plot is just beyond ridiculous (in a good way). Don't be so quick to call this couple innocent. The husband, yes, but the wife is a classic femme fatale.

 

Considering our latest module, The Opportunity, where Dr. Edwards discussed the political climate of post-war U.S., the concept of communism and everyone being suspect is subtly implied in this film. Sometimes those you think you're closest to, you actually know the least. That's pretty much the theme here. 

 

If I were to compare this opening scene to other films, it would align closely to Detour; random events/encounters can lead to a dark labyrinth of cruel twists of fate.

 

On a side note, for some reason, I really dislike Lisbeth Scott. Maybe because I love Lauren Bacall and Scott is just a cheap imitation.

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The scene opens with Alan and Jane Palmer driving at night along a lonely stretch of winding highway. They are going to meet friends for the evening, but Jane is not happy. She tells Alan to turn around because she can`t face another night feeling inferior. In Jane`s opinion, the lady friend flaunts her wealth. Many returning veterans had to start all over again when they came home. Jane feels that she is middle class poor, and you can see in her face the unhappiness. While Jane is fiddling with the ignition key to turn the car around, their headlights blink. A passing car mistakes their vehicle for a signal and throws a briefcase into the backseat of the Palmer`s convertible. Jane is in charge now, and she tells Alan to pull over to the side of the road. Alan opens the briefcase, and he finds the contents stuffed with money. Jane is now driving, and she is finally happy. The car careens recklessly along the highway, but Jane is going to get away before the mistake is found out. She is greedy, and we will soon learn that the money means more to her than Alan.

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- Compare the opening of this film with other Daily Doses that began with a similar set-up on a deserted highway at night. How does this film's fateful twist differ from other film scenes we have investigated?


The couple in the car, where the bag landed, were already at odds with each other.  The man was disrespecting his wife in a huge way.  Had he done as she asked, in the first place, immediately and without all the disparaging lip toward her, I don't think that this incident would have touch them.  Alas, that man pretty much brought on this incident......that's the way my educated guess is going, at this moment, that is.  I haven't seen this film yet.  I am really looking forward to seeing it.  I love Lizbeth Scott....but hate the way she's looking dowdy and under the thumb of her husband.  Still, if he wasn't such an ......hole.......they wouldn't be in this mess.


 


-- Why do you think unexpected incidents involving innocent people (such as today's couple) was such a popular postwar theme? What was changing in society and history that made this a popular film story for audiences at the time?


 


This was such a popular postwar theme, because by then in our society, it was clear that bad things could happen to good people.  Society and history was changing to a more cynical time.  It took a while for that cynicism to reach the small town in Louisiana, where I grew up....but the cynicism is there now.  I hardly recognize the place I grew up in....it's almost as if hoodlums and drug dealers have taken over.


-- Discuss this scene in terms of the style and substance of film noir. What do you see in this opening scene that confirms Eddie Muller's observation that this film is "'the best unknown American film noir of the classic era."


The style is film noir and the fact that they are traveling on a road almost entirely alone....then the lady, Lizbeth Scott, who was at first under her husband's thumb suddenly takes charge and starts driving down the road...determined to get out from under...yes, that's it....as this woman strives to get out from under this incident, she is really striving to get from under her feelings of  inferiority from the woman who they were going to see....feelings of being inferior to her.....out from under the thumb of her husband, and now to save her life, she's taken the wheel of the car and driving like mad on this scary and very dangerous mountain road.  She's definitely trying to save them from the car that is now following them, surmising that the bag was meant for that car chasing them.  Both these cars were rag tops, tops down, where the man in the lone car, who threw the bag was not in a rag top.


 


THIS IS EXCITING.....CAN'T WAIT TO SEE THIS MOVIE!!!


 


#NOIRSUMMER


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Too Late for Tears is similar to both Kiss Me Deadly and The Hitch-Hiker in its initial setup involving the long, winding dark roads of the night. The darkness and casting of shadows present a foreshadowing of sorts for the film's two leads.This brings about a sense of dread, likely resulting in an ill fated ending for either Alan or Jane, possibly even both.

 

All three films thrust characters into unwanted situations. They're all instances of "being in the wrong place at the wrong time." All characters will ultimately fight or flee, but their resistance is mostly unnecessary as fate is usually sealed once a character makes one wrong move. And there is no turning back. Swede says it best in The Killers, "I did something wrong.... once."

 

This scene's setup is a great metaphorically cinematic depiction in what citizens of the world faced during the postwar era. Alan and Jane represent audiences; they're riding along, anticipating attending a party. They are living life, seemingly carefree. And by mere chance, their entire world is changed within only a few seconds.

 

People probably felt as though they were victims of an unwanted and lengthy war, as it robbed them of the life they had once enjoyed. War surrounded everyone both during and after its end. And it was a constant reminder of the terrible time especially if a family lost any loved ones. Losing someone is unshakable, and it becomes a difficult aspect of everyday life, with people making the aching attempt to learn how to endure.

 

This opening scene is illuminated by both its substance and its style. The shadowy figure of the night is literally waiting, watching, lurking patiently for the appropriate time to present the leads with an obstacle affecting their lives in the worst possible way. The realistic depth of this scene hints on unforeseen happenings in one's own life, which is likely the reason film noir saw great, and worthy popularity.

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In this opening we sense that a random, unlikely event - a bag of money tossed by mistake into an open car - will put a rift between a married man and woman. And may well set in motion events too big for either to handle, because you know that that bag of money won't be allowed to go astray just like that. At first it appears like an incredible stroke of luck for the couple but the unease lies thick in the air.

 

Jane's hunger for the money is apparent but I think it's more than just naked greed. We know from the course materials that in the postwar era and into the 50s, class and social standing became prominent issues in the minds of the vast white middle-class. Jane's sense of being shamed and humiliated by those who had pricier baubles to flaunt than she did was very real and understandable in the context of the era which gave birth to "keeping up with the Joneses" and unfettered consumerism became the new normal. And more than greed is evident in Jane's expression as she makes the fateful decision to keep and fight for the money. There's a taste of power and adventure in there too, a chance to break out  the odious "good wife" role as she takes the wheel and races away from their pursuer (Dan Duryea as it turns out. So we know things are gonna get hot).

 

Seems that Lizabeth Scott sometimes gets a bad rap. I read that already back then she was being compared unfavorably to Lauren Bacall. And I know firsthand her presence still rubs more than a few noir fans the wrong way. Should we fault her for having similar voice and features but appearing more ordinary than the matchless Bacall?

 

By the way, compare this TCM clip to the older public domain versions on youtube and elsewhere to get a taste of what the Film Noir Foundation's restoration has done for this movie. This restored version is what TCM will run on Friday!

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-- Compare the opening of this film with other Daily Doses that began with a similar set-up on a deserted highway at night. How does this film's fateful twist differ from other film scenes we have investigated?

 

It differs in that its an ordinary man & wife who randomly get caught up in a pre planned exchange. They are the catalyst for their own descent into Noirsville.

 

 

-- Why do you think unexpected incidents involving innocent people (such as today's couple) was such a popular postwar theme? What was changing in society and history that made this a popular film story for audiences at the time?

 

Society was turned on its ear by the war, women had become part of the workforce in great numbers and were taking a pro-active role in their lives and marriages.

 

 

-- Discuss this scene in terms of the style and substance of film noir. What do you see in this opening scene that confirms Eddie Muller's observation that this film is "'the best unknown American film noir of the classic era."

 

Probably because it deals with what at the onset seems the typical American couple, the Ozzie & Harriets, the June & Ward Cleavers having a spat about visiting friends that the wife is not to keen about encountering, a woman who looks down her nose at her. 

 

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Several moments in this opening point to changing society in post-war America. Firstly, the wife doesn't want to visit the other couple because she feels that she's looked down upon: perhaps because she hasn't been able to "keep up with the Joneses" in the new America, maybe they don't have the money to compete in the new society's burgeoning consumerism. Secondly, the money almost literally drops into their laps. It's wish fulfillment writ large: the equivalent of the lottery win, all their wishes could now come true and - for the wife especially - she could now be the Jones other people aspire to be. 

 

Except this is Noir, and the audience knows that that's not the way this world works. 

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-- Compare the opening of this film with other Daily Doses that began with a similar set-up on a deserted highway at night. How does this film's fateful twist differ from other film scenes we have investigated?

The first pictures of Too Late... (a mysterious car on a deserted road at night) convey a dark atmosphere, like Kiss Me Deadly.  The twist comes from the couple arguing in their car about the friends they're about to meet. Their preoccupations and their frustrations contrast with the planned exchange. We first see the details of the exchange, then the couple arguing, is meaningful for me. In The Hitch-Hiker, a mysterious man brings chaos to the life of two ordinary guys, whereas here, it's like the everyday preoccupations of an innocent couple interrupted the carefully planned exchange between two thugs. Alan and Jane are the disruptive element, in a way.

-- Why do you think unexpected incidents involving innocent people (such as today's couple) was such a popular postwar theme? What was changing in society and history that made this a popular film story for audiences at the time?

Cold War, McCarthyism and the paranoid atmsphere of the late fourties certainly explain a lot.

-- Discuss this scene in terms of the style and substance of film noir. What do you see in this opening scene that confirms Eddie Muller's observation that this film is "'the best unknown American film noir of the classic era."

What struck me here, aside from the mise en scene and the way tension is built, is the role reversal: Jane is mesmerized by the money inside the bag, she makes the decision to start the engine and tries to leave behind the other car - with success. She seems very excited about all this. Her husband doesn't take any initiative in the final moments of this scene. Somehow, this opening looks like a metaphor of the societal changes in America at this time: women are becoming more independent, they're making the decisions, and men, like Alan here, stay in the backseat and seem to wonder what's happening.

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A car parks on the side of the road.  The driver's face is obscured in darkness except for a lit lower half.  We cannot identify him but we know he is waiting for someone.

 

Another car approaches with a couple in conflict.  Jane expresses feelings of economic inferiority in a social situation they are about to attend, to the point she almost wrecks the car trying to get her husband to turn around.  This seems like a hint of instability in her character.  A bag is mistakenly thrown into their car and they discover it is full of money.  Jane brightens.  Another car approaches and Jane jumps into the driver's seat and dangerously escapes the other car, taking  over the situation both literally and figuratively. 

 

This is a film I am looking forward to seeing.

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I'm loving this week of Daily Doses. Too Late for Tears is another film I have watched on repeat.  It is pure noir! I love Lisbeth Scott. She has always been Lauren Becall's sister from the wrong side of the tracks to me and is more noir than Becall. Like I've read somewhere before, Becall is slumming, Scott is the real deal.  She rivals Claire Trevor as Queen of Noir for me.

 

The opening again on a highway, dark and something happens that changes lives.  In this film Scott is not Suzy Homemaker. She grabs that wheel from her husband.   :D But in this film, I don't believe fate is the downfall. SPOILERS. Lisbeth's Scott's downfall is materialism and her insatisable need to keep up with the Jones...

 

I am so happy this film has been restored, can't wait to see it on Friday because I've always watched a really bad print of it.

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Wk 7 Too Late for Tears

 

-- Compare the opening of this film with other Daily Doses that began with a similar set-up on a deserted highway at night. How does this film's fateful twist differ from other film scenes we have investigated Usually the fateful twist involves something random occurring that has a negative effect on the protagonist.  Here, something ostensibly good happens to the protagonists: someone hurls a satchel full of money into their car.  You usually fear for the protagonist; here you’re rooting for them, empathizing with them.

 

-- Why do you think unexpected incidents involving innocent people (such as today's couple) was such a popular postwar theme? What was changing in society and history that made this a popular film story for audiences at the time?  Are they “innocent?”  Lizbeth Scott has this duplicity from the first shot.  Kennedy is the hapless misogynist who lamely suggests that “he take over” the driving after she has successfully proven that she can handle the vehicle, losing a car in hot pursuit, without going completely off the road.  But to answer the question, after WWII, everyone came home to pursue the “American Dream.”  Everyone in any time period fantasizes about winning the lottery.  In the 1950s, when that was illegal here, my parents always somehow finagled getting a ticket or two for the Irish Sweepstakes!  People watching this movie I’m sure wished that someone would throw a satchel full of cash into their car.  The audiences most likely had a strong emotional connection to this “get rich quick” concept, and wanted to apply it to their own dreams in post war America:  “I’ll Buy That Dream,” a popular song recorded by many singers, including Dick Haymes and Helen Forrest, crystallizes this concept: “We'll settle down near Dallas, In a little plastic palace. It's not as crazy as you think.  Imagine me on our first anniversary, with some one like you in the nursery.  Oh, it doesn't sound bad, and if it can be had,
(Both together) I'll buy that dream.”

 

-- Discuss this scene in terms of the style and substance of film noir. What do you see in this opening scene that confirms Eddie Muller's observation that this film is "'the best unknown American film noir of the classic era." It has many noir conventions: night for night, mysterious guy in a car, hapless couple inadvertently encounters him.  Location shots of vehicles careening around winding canyon roads coupled with studio setups with rear projected motion backdrops. I reserve judgment on this one until I see the entire film.  I may very well rave about it later, and sincerely hope that I do, but with the exception of something good happening to someone, I don’t see anything new here.  The setup has Lizbeth Scott hawking about some society dame who looked down on her.  When she sees the money it’s like blood in the water; she’s got this ravenous look in her eye as she tells her husband to get in the car.  Things cannot end well for this woman, and I haven't seen the movie yet!   If I’m busy noticing the lip liner that’s attempting to make her upper lip appear fuller, you know something’s not right. To be continued…

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- Compare the opening of this film with other Daily Doses that began with a similar set-up on a deserted highway at night. How does this film's fateful twist differ from other film scenes we have investigated?

The couple in the car, where the bag landed, were already at odds with each other.  The man was disrespecting his wife in a huge way.  Had he done as she asked, in the first place, immediately and without all the disparaging lip toward her, I don't think that this incident would have touch them.  Alas, that man pretty much brought on this incident......that's the way my educated guess is going, at this moment, that is.  I haven't seen this film yet.  I am really looking forward to seeing it.  I love Lizbeth Scott....but hate the way she's looking dowdy and under the thumb of her husband.  Still, if he wasn't such an ......hole.......they wouldn't be in this mess.

 

-- Why do you think unexpected incidents involving innocent people (such as today's couple) was such a popular postwar theme? What was changing in society and history that made this a popular film story for audiences at the time?

 

This was such a popular postwar theme, because by then in our society, it was clear that bad things could happen to good people.  Society and history was changing to a more cynical time.  It took a while for that cynicism to reach the small town in Louisiana, where I grew up....but the cynicism is there now.  I hardly recognize the place I grew up in....it's almost as if hoodlums and drug dealers have taken over.

-- Discuss this scene in terms of the style and substance of film noir. What do you see in this opening scene that confirms Eddie Muller's observation that this film is "'the best unknown American film noir of the classic era."

The style is film noir and the fact that they are traveling on a road almost entirely alone....then the lady, Lizbeth Scott, who was at first under her husband's thumb suddenly takes charge and starts driving down the road...determined to get out from under...yes, that's it....as this woman strives to get out from under this incident, she is really striving to get from under her feelings of  inferiority from the woman who they were going to see....feelings of being inferior to her.....out from under the thumb of her husband, and now to save her life, she's taken the wheel of the car and driving like mad on this scary and very dangerous mountain road.  She's definitely trying to save them from the car that is now following them, surmising that the bag was meant for that car chasing them.  Both these cars were rag tops, tops down, where the man in the lone car, who threw the bag was not in a rag top.

 

THIS IS EXCITING.....CAN'T WAIT TO SEE THIS MOVIE!!!

 

#NOIRSUMMER

 

 

Hi Diane - I see what is happening with some of your posts. We have an official thread for all the Daily Doses - they are not "disappearing" from the message boards - they are being added to the official thread so that we don't open up duplicate topics. What will happen is that at some point today, the moderator will move this point to the official thread - please check the "pinned" section at the top of the message boards first before opening a new thread on the Daily Doses! Thanks! And thanks for posting! These are terrific observations. 

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Interesting to me that Jane's character does a complete 180.  In the first part of the scene, she's complaining that she doesn't want to go to a party because the hostess always makes her feel insecure.  The hosts apparently live in a huge house overlooking much of Hollywood, and the "diamond-studded wife" is very "patronizing".  Jane's demeanor is at first subdued, but then she grows more anxious, trying to grab the keys from the ignition to make her husband hear her.


 


After the bag is opened and money is found, a car approaches from behind the couple.  Jane suddenly comes to life and takes charge.  She commands Alan to get in the car, starts it up, and tears off.  Through the ensuing chase, Jane's face is a picture of smug self-pride.  A slight smile on her face and a twinkle in her eye, she twists the steering wheel and enjoys being the mistress of her fate.  Poor Alan can just hang on for dear life and wonder what happened to her.


 


What has happened to Jane?  How has she suddenly turned from whining about how the hostess makes her feel insecure to this take-charge and get-it-done woman?  It's the money in the bag.  In the few seconds that she had it in sight, Jane felt that she was equal to the patronizing hostess.  She too could be a "diamond-studded wife" and no longer feel insignificant.  This reflects the struggle of women in post-WWII America to balance what their role had been during the war with what it would be after the men came home.  Women wanted to retain the feeling of empowerment.  And men were just along for the wild ride.


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No one has to sell me on the merits of this wonderful film; I've been enjoying it on a public domain collection for a couple of years now.

 

Lizabeth Scott is one of my favourite noir femmes. True, her range is extremely limited and she's no conventional beauty...but I'm madly in love with her. No doubt my wife harbors the same feelings for Dan Duryea...

 

Scott is a selfish 'brat' of a wife who is not above using her husband(s) to claw her way up the social ladder. When they've outlived their usefulness...well....

 

Duryea is a two bit thug who's latched on to a big payday...unfortunately the mark hit the wrong vehicle with the payoff and now Scott has Duryea's loot...well, almost has it. Now the two little rats have to scurry together if they hope to enjoy the spoils.

 

Duryea thinks he's a tough guy until he runs across the even more feral Scott. She'll stop at nothing to grab the brass ring, but the past will come back to bite you in films noir and...well, the rest is a spoiler alert.

 

This is a wonderful film. If you haven't seen it in its entirety do not miss it this Friday on TCM. It's what Robert Osbourne might call "an essential". Really excited to see what she looks like with a new coat of paint. Thanks Eddie!

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You took the words right out of my keyboard.  I've always felt Scott was a cheap imitation of Bacall.  

I agree with you. She was not one of my favorites.  But I pose this:  Was her mediocrity also her brilliance?  Perhaps I'm over-thinking!

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In my eyes, the beginning of Too Late For Tears, due to the absence of highlights, always looks darker; as if we are roaming through the cave of total oblivion and ignorance… Only until we see the radiant face of our female protagonist at the sight of a bag full of money we get awaken from our "phlegmatic slumber". Shaken by the radical turn of events we get pulled into their world, and even though our conscience is screaming: 'No, don't do it!' we can't help but stick by to witness the "bitter end" we had already anticipated with our guts.

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Elizabeth Scott in Too Late For Tears, embraces the chance to keep newly acquired money. Along with embracing that money, comes a total flip of roles which Elizabeth Scott seems to revel. This role reversal in the film runs along side the role reversal for women during this time period.

When the couple run with the money, they are going to be running for their lives. When I think of the other noirs I've watched, the protagonists seems to be running from their horror (Cloris Leachman in Kiss Me Deadly), or the characters are entangled by horrible fates (The Hitchhikers). Kennedy and Scott are embracing their horrible fate. In a split second, they make a noir choice.

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The bag gets flipped into the car.  Nice shot!  I almost expect the car will start rolling down the road as they get out.  Fortunately not.  Would have been great if they open the bag and a brilliant glow emanates!  Love when Lisabeth Scott starts moving the car and Kennedy tumbles into the back seat as they speed down the road.  A little comic relief amongst the noir.  Intrigue abounds!  How can one not want to continue watching?

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Going to take this time to thank all people responsible for saving this film.  These type films are very important, as b movies, they shown us so much more than just a topic  or genre trend, and so necessary to live on for the future.  As we move forward, we can

see that the magic of films of this time is more than just the lighting scenery and acting.  They show us how we were and how we developed over time.  A history caught by lens that can be shown in classrooms of the future to teach the future. Hopefully, we will see these b movies are as important, and in some cases more important, than the high production a movies, that will always be saved.  These movies are the hidden jewels of America and should remain treated as historical buildings that are preserved and used by future generations and in the evolving media content driven future, we could use the retro flashbacks for so much and interesting ways.  Keep up the good work, thank you for seeing the future for all of us.

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I watched this one for the first time last week, a poor copy from one of those public domain collections that I've had for years. I didn't realize it would be a focus of our studies this week, but am so glad it is. I'm looking forward to a re-watch of the restored version Friday; it's that good.

 

For those of you who haven't seen it, oh my, see it! You're in for a ride. This opening scene doesn't begin to hint at the tale to come. I would urge you all to analyze the three male "leads" in this movie as you watch. They're almost archetypes.

 

And Lizabeth Scott. Put the Bacall comparisons out of your minds and take another look. She's sensational in this part. Perfectly cast for who and what her character is.

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