Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Despicable Cable Movie Channel! (not TCM)


Tikisoo
 Share

Recommended Posts

MrTiki has been home all week confined to the couch with a back injury, so he watched a lot of TV.

 

He saw his fave movie SERPICO was playing so he tuned in. He reported to me that it was unwatchable because the channel put their logo in the empty the black bars on the side of the picture!

 

Not a small ghost logo, like TCM, but a large distracting logo in color along the entire side of the screen!

 

Back when I had cable, I stuck a small square of dark tape over the spot where "animated" logos were, to block them out of my field of vision. But there is no ignoring this new aggressive obnoxiousness.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen that "side cropping" done on a couple of newer channels that show old TV episodes from the early '70's and such, and usually on older movies NOT shot in "panavision" or " Cinemascope".  Both "H&I channel and COZI do some of this.

 

 

Sepiatone

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen that "side cropping" done on a couple of newer channels that show old TV episodes from the early '70's and such, and usually on older movies NOT shot in "panavision" or " Cinemascope".  Both "H&I channel and COZI do some of this.

 

 

Sepiatone

THIS-TV is the biggest violator with classic films

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've seen that "side cropping" done on a couple of newer channels that show old TV episodes from the early '70's and such, and usually on older movies NOT shot in "panavision" or " Cinemascope". Both "H&I channel and COZI do some of this.

 

 

Sepiatone

I think this is done to approximate the original dimensions of the tv shows and non-widescreen movies, since most tvs today are elongated sideways, unlike the more nearly square screens of old. If you change the view to "Zoom", the whole screen will fill up, but might crop off the top and bottom of the image.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think this is done to approximate the original dimensions of the tv shows and non-widescreen movies, since most tvs today are elongated sideways, unlike the more nearly square screens of old. If you change the view to "Zoom", the whole screen will fill up, but might crop off the top and bottom of the image.

The side bars are normal for older television shows, because they were not widescreen.  It would not be normal for most films made after 1953, like SERPICO, since they ARE widescreen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it has something to do with the multiple technologies going on now.  I have an HD TV hooked to a cable box, a CRT TV hooked to a cable box and a CRT TV hooked to an antenna through a converter.

They all show pictures differently.

I think it is the process that is used to broadcast the old shows and then how the cable or dish companies send those signals.  I know that I can go into the programming for my cable box and change the screen settings.  Mostly size and whether or not sides are cropped to show a larger picture top to bottom.

My HD TV has no side bars on any of the "over the air" channels, but the CRT hooked to cable frequently does, especially on Cozi.  The TV hooked to an antenna has no bars for a few stations and top and bottom bars for all others.  The Cozi station and others from the same broadcaster has bars all around.

Regardless, I dislike the logos as well.  Especially the large or colored ones.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it has something to do with the multiple technologies going on now.  I have an HD TV hooked to a cable box, a CRT TV hooked to a cable box and a CRT TV hooked to an antenna through a converter.

They all show pictures differently.

I think it is the process that is used to broadcast the old shows and then how the cable or dish companies send those signals.  I know that I can go into the programming for my cable box and change the screen settings.  Mostly size and whether or not sides are cropped to show a larger picture top to bottom.

My HD TV has no side bars on any of the "over the air" channels, but the CRT hooked to cable frequently does, especially on Cozi.  The TV hooked to an antenna has no bars for a few stations and top and bottom bars for all others.  The Cozi station and others from the same broadcaster has bars all around.

Regardless, I dislike the logos as well.  Especially the large or colored ones.

Yes,it is, strictly how a channel broadcasts.  THIS broadcasts in an aspect ratio of 1.33:1 (old TV ratio).  If they broadcast in the new TV ratios of  1:77:1, then the screen would be filled, side to side, by most films made after 1953, but would not by television shows produced prior to HDTV.  Zooming is distorting the imagine or cropping it at the top and bottom.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The side bars are normal for older television shows, because they were not widescreen.  It would not be normal for most films made after 1953, like SERPICO, since they ARE widescreen.

 

 

Yes, I'm happy when I see the bars used for pre-widescreen TV shows to preserve the 4:3 aspect ratio in which they were  created, but the use of them makes no sense for widescreen movies such as SERPICO.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

More troubling than the logo is the fact that there were black bars on either side of the image.  That means the film was being cropped, and that makes them far more despicable, to me.

Actually, that's not always the case. If your watching something and it has a smaller picture with black on all four sides, chances are you're watching  an HD signal that's been converted down to  SD on a channel that either doesn't broadcast in HD or that your cable or satellite company doesn't carry in HD.

 

There's two ways to do that, one is to just chop off the sides and fill the whole standard 3:4 screen or keep the proper aspect ratio and make it smaller so nothing is lost. It seems more and more channels are choosing the latter. Usually, if that picture is shaped like a 16:9 screen, it's  the whole thing just smaller.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, I'm happy when I see the bars used for pre-widescreen TV shows to reserve the 4:3 aspect ratio in which they were  created, but the use of them makes no sense for widescreen movies such as SERPICO.

 

Not me. I'm never happy to see bars at the sides.

 

I keep my Akai wide screen tv settings so that the screen is always filled up side to side. The only time I don't get that is when a broadcast is done in window-box. In that event I simply watch something else - windowboxing p!sses me off.

 

As for movies, I stopped watching movies on tv a long time ago. I watch only TCM or DVD's for movies. If TCM ever changes it's onscreen policy to what other channels are doing, I'll go exclusively to DVD's.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not me. I'm never happy to see bars at the sides.

 

I keep my Akai wide screen tv settings so that the screen is always filled up side to side. The only time I don't get that is when a broadcast is done in window-box. In that event I simply watch something else - windowboxing p!sses me off.

 

As for movies, I stopped watching movies on tv a long time ago. I watch only TCM or DVD's for movies. If TCM ever changes it's onscreen policy to what other channels are doing, I'll go exclusively to DVD's.

 

I don't like it when the vertical of shows created in the 4:3 aspect ratio is cropped to create a faux widescreen.

The stretching of 4:3 shows and movies is even worse.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't like it when the vertical of shows created in the 4:3 aspect ratio is cropped to create a faux widescreen.

The stretching of 4:3 shows and movies is even worse.

 

I understand your preference.

 

However, my tv does a reasonable job of making the picture acceptable. Leaving it at 4x3 is unbearable as it provides ugly greenish-grey borders at the sides. I can't hack it. Even if the borders were black, though - I'd still go for the widescreen adaption - which on my Akai is known as "Panorama" .

 

Each to their own.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't like it when the vertical of shows created in the 4:3 aspect ratio is cropped to create a faux widescreen.

The stretching of 4:3 shows and movies is even worse.

 

Me too.

 

The History channel has several shows called VIETNAM IN HD and WORLD WAR II IN HD, and both series are cropped top and bottom to make them look wide-screen.

 

The image quality is very good since they were dubbed from 16mm and 35mm to HD Video, but they were filmed in 4:3 and NOT in wide screen

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is an interesting way anyone with a 16:9 LCD TV can tell if the black bars belong to the TV or if they are being broadcast to us by the TV channel.

 

Change your BRIGHTNESS and CONTRAST controls on your TV. If the black bars remain solid black, then that is your black TV screen you are seeing. But if the black bars get brighter with the change in brightness, then that means those black bars are being broadcast to us by that TV channel.

 

For example, when TCM shows a very wide Cinemascope movie, the top and bottom black bars are being broadcast to us by TCM, and we are receiving only about half a picture of the movie (the center half), while the top 1/4 and bottom 1/4 are the black bars that TCM is broadcasting to us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is an interesting way anyone with a 16:9 LCD TV can tell if the black bars belong to the TV or if they are being broadcast to us by the TV channel.

 

Change your BRIGHTNESS and CONTRAST controls on your TV. If the black bars remain solid black, then that is your black TV screen you are seeing. But if the black bars get brighter with the change in brightness, then that means those black bars are being broadcast to us by that TV channel.

 

For example, when TCM shows a very wide Cinemascope movie, the top and bottom black bars are being broadcast to us by TCM, and we are receiving only about half a picture of the movie (the center half), while the top 1/4 and bottom 1/4 are the black bars that TCM is broadcasting to us.

 

Yes, when TCM uses letterboxing for those CinemaScope movies, we are seeing the entire image as it was shown theatrically.

The letterbox bars are used to preserve the original widescreen format of the movie. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, when TCM uses letterboxing for those CinemaScope movies, we are seeing the entire image as it was shown theatrically.

 

 

We are seeing half a film, half a picture, with the top and bottom missing. No sky, no grass, no lake, no mountains. It's just a querk of the incompatibility of the two formats.

 

The movies should have never left the old 4:3 format.

 

We didn't need wide screen for GONE WITH THE WIND, DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK, DOUBLE INDEMNITY, THE THIRD MAN, OUT OF THE PAST, and all those beautiful 1940s Betty Grable Technicolor movies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are seeing half a film, half a picture, with the top and bottom missing. No sky, no grass, no lake, no mountains. It's just a querk of the incompatibility of the two formats.

 

The movies should have never left the old 4:3 format.

 

We didn't need wide screen for GONE WITH THE WIND, DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK, DOUBLE INDEMNITY, THE THIRD MAN, OUT OF THE PAST, and all those beautiful 1940s Betty Grable Technicolor movies.

 

I think you are incorrect.

The purpose of letterboxing is to preseve the entire image of a film as seen in the cinema.

 

Letterboxing is used as an alternative to a full-screen, pan-and-scan transfer of a widescreen film image to videotape or videodisc. In pan-and-scan transfers, the original image is cropped to the narrower aspect ratio of the destination format, usually the 1.33:1 (4:3) ratio of the standard television screen, whereas letterboxing preserves the film's original image composition as seen in the cinema. Letterboxing was developed for use in 4:3 television displays before widescreen television screens were available, but it is also necessary to represent on a 16:9 widescreen display the unaltered original composition of a film with a wider aspect ratio, such as Panavision's 2.35:1 ratio.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

© 2023 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...