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Alex Rocco (1936-2015)


jakeem
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Emmy Award-winning actor Alex Rocco, who played the brash Las Vegas casino operator Moe Greene in "The Godfather," has died at the age of 79.

 

In Francis Ford Coppola's 1972 Academy Award-winning drama, Rocco's character makes the fatal mistake of underestimating -- and disrespecting -- the Corleone family after the ascendance of young Michael Corleone (Al Pacino).

 

 

 

Rocco won a 1989-1990 Primetime Emmy for his supporting performances in the CBS sitcom
"The Famous Teddy Z," which starred Jon Cryer as a budding Hollywood agent. Rocco appeared as the slick veteran agent Al Floss. 

 

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2015/07/19/alex-rocco-moe-greene-godfather-simpsons/30381989/

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If Rocco had somehow gotten an Oscar nomination for playing Mo Greene, that would have truly been revolutionizing the concept of what's considered a supporting performance. I think it's a testament to how great he was that it never occurred to me until watching this video that his screen time is under three minutes (well, he gets a few more dialogue-free seconds late in the pic when ... oh well, I won't say, in the extremely unlikely case that someone reading this post has never seen THE GODFATHER). 

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Funny you mention THE ENTITY, Sepiatone.  Another actor who appeared in "The Entity" died the same day as Alex Rocco.  George Coe also died July 18 at 86.  He had a decent-sized part in "The Entity", but I don't recall if he shared any scenes with Alex Rocco.  

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Funny you mention THE ENTITY, Sepiatone.  Another actor who appeared in "The Entity" died the same day as Alex Rocco.  George Coe also died July 18 at 86.  He had a decent-sized part in "The Entity", but I don't recall if he shared any scenes with Alex Rocco.  

 

It's always amazed me that George Coe was one of the original "Not Ready For Prime Time Players" during the early stages of "Saturday Night Live." Most people probably don't remember that.

 

 

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Jakeem, you might like to know in Tom Shales & James Andrew Miller's 594-page history of "Saturday Night Live" entitled LIVE FROM NEW YORK, George Coe gets referenced in only one sentence, and here is that sentence: "The young performers were supplemented by an older Broadway actor named George Coe, who helped with narrations and commercial parodies and stayed around for one season only."

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Jakeem, you might like to know in Tom Shales & James Andrew Miller's 594-page history of "Saturday Night Live" entitled LIVE FROM NEW YORK, George Coe gets referenced in only one sentence, and here is that sentence: "The young performers were supplemented by an older Broadway actor named George Coe, who helped with narrations and commercial parodies and stayed around for one season only."

 

Wow! I wonder if Coe was mentioned during SNL's 40th anniversary special, which aired in February.

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Wow! I wonder if Coe was mentioned during SNL's 40th anniversary special, which aired in February.

No, he wasn't.  Coe was only credited as a NRFPT Player for the first show.  He made some scant appearances in some sketches for the remainder of the season, but never again credited as a cast member.  But what's also a bit spooky.....

 

The day I found out he died, I caught KRAMER VS. KRAMER on PBS that night( WTVS, the Detroit PBS station shows uncut classic movies most Friday nights. "uncut" as in commercial free, that doesn't mean they DIDN'T blur JOBETH WILLIAMS' appearance!)

 

You'll all recall He was Hoffman's boss in that one.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Both shows were very good, and his were mature, welcome performances.

 

I told someone he had died. Who he? The guy who got shot in the eye in Godfather. Ah, that guy!

Yes, in a way, Rocco was not a household name-- but still instantly recognizable for the characters he played in various productions.

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