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Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose of Darkness #25: Time for a Heist (Opening Scene of Kansas City Confidential)

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The perfect crime is one where emotions are not involved, and in a lot of the movies we've watched, they are quite emotional.  It was rather interesting to see the man observing the movements of everyone on the street, what time the delivery was made to the florist, how long it took for the delivery, when the armored truck arrived and approximately how long it took for the armored truck to be at the bank.  You have to wonder about the variables, and if there were any.  The only one I could see off hand was that there was only one armed guard because the other was holding two bags.

Couple of off-topic notes:

*  No ATMs!!  People had to wait patiently for the bank to open!!  Talk about bankers' hours!

 

*  In taking this class, I've noticed that elements of film noir are still being used because I got caught up on "Once Upon A Time", and when the storytellers were giving us the backstory of The Writer, there were so many things that reminded me of the movies from the 1940s-1950s.

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All of this attention to clocks and time serves to build suspense in this opening scene. The use of the various camera shots- long to give us the point of view of the observer, and the close-ups of Preston Foster's face to build tension. A heist story fits perfectly into the noir universe for many reasons- one of them being the opportunity for the old double cross. These heist plots get us thinking that the crooks are very clever, and sometimes we even root for them to succeed.

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Time. It's one of those things that we wish we could control, but, inevitably, can only count on. Clocks, and watches move at a predetermined pace. We set our lives by them as does the man watching the bank. This is counterbalanced by the erratic pacing feet of the people doing daily errands, people rubber-necking to see into the bank, like chickens for the feed, the rhythmic heartbeat of the music that slows and builds as the scene progresses. We know that timing is everything for this man and that his intentions are dark and nefarious. This is a heist, a gamble where all factors need to be precise and, yet, we know that people are not. We know we are being set up to believe that all factors have been taken into account. That's what the check marks are for. But at any moment the "noir" factor is going twist this perfectly timed crime into a continuance of chaos.

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-- Discuss the role of time and timing in this scene.

To create the perfect crime requires research, here we see someone recording the comings and goings of 2 vehicles and their drivers. From the data recorded, we see that both the flower deliveries and the armored vehicle have very precise schedules. This makes it easier to plan for "the perfect crime."

 

-- What are the film noir elements (style or substance) that you notice in the opening of this film?

There are several film noir elements observed in this short clip. At the beginning we see rolling text of what the film is about. This text takes the place of a voice over and gives the film a sense of a documentary. The music draws your attention that something important is going to happen. The closeups of the street diagram and the watch are key film noir elements. We also see shadows on the hotel room as the observer moves around.

 

-- Why is a heist a good subject for a film noir to tackle? Put another way, how or why might a film that involves a heist affect or change what we think about criminals and/or criminal behavior on screen?

A heist requires planning, this means that the person or people planning and executing the operation must have above average intelligence. Most people appreciate watching smart people in operation. These planners are not the thugs in charge of collecting protection money and other racket operations and then break bones when not satisfied.

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I'm not sure that The Heist is the ideal central focus for a film noir. ...yes, I know that this entire course is framed around the concept of the Heist, and that film noir's relentless focus on underworld activity means that the crimes themselves provide major plot elements. But as I'm formulating my own sense of how to define films noir, I come back to the idea that these films are character driven primarily, and, to use Hitchcock's famous phrase, the Heist is just another MacGuffin, an arbitrary device that moves the plot forward. To get wrapped up in the obsessive details of the Heist is not very interesting in itself (to me). I might identify with the planner of the heist or the various criminals involved, but I am not one of those viewers who romanticizes thievery or law enforcement. This film would only grab me if it does move on from the Heist to some sort of exploration of the characters involved. And what makes it noir (to me) is seeing the characters get sucked into and grappling with the ethical and existential dilemmas of that world of shadows.

 

Btw, where is the femme fatale? As a sideline, do all films noir require one? My tentative answer is "yes," and again, she needs to be central to the plot and motivation. In Heist / Criminal films, women tend to be gangster arm candy, not motivating factors -- in this film, it remains to be seen. And I'm still working on my definition here. The Hitch-Hiker, for example, didn't have a femme fatale (unless you somehow count Ida Lupino the director) but it's so completely character-driven that it's sneaking under the umbrella of the genre. 

 

Of course, the Heist does give this film some noir potential, and from what another commentator said about how this particular "business man" stepped over the line and into illegality sounds potentially interesting. To the extent that seeing the workings of a heist help us see the complex and dark, but understandable and sympathetic motivations of un-social behavior, it's a good start, But so far, this film is a police procedural, in the Crime genre. A Heist film does not equal Film Noir. To me, anyway. ...although I'm sure that many of you, starting with the Professor, will disagree. 

You raise an interesting point about whether films noir require femmes fatales. I think a femme fatale is a good idea, but not required.

 

The problem we have in determining whether a film is noir, noirsish, or just a melodrama is that there was no generally agreed upon set of rules for how to make a "film noir" at the time that the films were being made. The term has only been applied in retrospect. Yesterday, I watched Billy Wilder's "Double Indemnity," which was made in 1944 and is now considered by many to be the best film noir ever made. But when asked about D. I., Billy Wilder admitted "I never heard that expression, film noir, when I made Double Indemnity... I just made pictures I would have liked to see. When I was lucky, it coincided with the taste of the audience. With Double Indemnity, I was lucky."

 

For me, the defining characteristic of films noir is that they must portray people who are doomed, no matter what they do. To convey these types of stories, film noir makers often utilized low-key lighting, flashbacks, narration, femmes fatales, etc., but in my opinion, for a film to be considered noir, it does not have to include each and every one of the elements we now associate with films noir.  

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Discuss the role of time and timing in this scene.

- The second shot after the inter-titles pans, showing a clock on the bldg.  A later shot depicts said clock much closer.  We will be introduced to the wrist watch in an extreme close-up. Just about every other shot features a clock, watch, or the time-table.  Time is one of the characters of this movie.

 

What are the film noir elements (style or substance) that you notice in the opening of this film?

Style: The inter-titles are against a rough backdrop with subtle diagonal shadows.  The music over the inter-titles says ‘police’, but changes to ‘drama’ with the Kansas City establishment shot of Union Station.  At the close-up of the man who will be taking times, the music says ‘danger’.  The clock and watch (everyday items) are shown but really mean something else.  Two nearly identical panel wagons park in front of the building; the florist driver, (wearing a military style cap) brings something in; the security officers (wearing military style caps) take something out.
Complete lack of dialogue allows realistic sounds to be heard and add to the tension.

   Substance:  The pacing is steady, but draws the audience in. All of the people are regular Joes going about life.  The pair of trucks adds some parallel and contrast.  The trucks/drivers coupled with the timetable provide an aura of precision that isn’t exactly comfortable, yet is intriguing.  The man timing the action is focused, serious, not smiling—as if he’s on a mission, even though WWII is over.

 

Why is a heist a good subject for a film noir to tackle? Put another way, how or why might a film that involves a heist affect or change what we think about criminals and/or criminal behavior on screen?

- Perhaps the criminal has a compelling or moral reason for his actions, even though they are illegal.  The heist could provide a windfall for a regular Joe.  The audience can relate to that, although most likely would not act on such fantasy.  A Dark escape from reality for the movie-goers.

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-- Discuss the role of time and timing in this scene. Time and timing is everything, since the protagonist is planning a robbery and must watch his victim every day and keep notes to get the time when events happen just right.

 

-- What are the film noir elements (style or substance) that you notice in the opening of this film? The score during the introduction is very aggressive with its loud volume and marching rhythm blasting the listener with brass – reminds me of the beginning of D.O.A. when the protagonist is marching down endless hallways to report a murder. The substance of the notes that scroll up suggest that all of this is real – realism is part of the style of film noir. The shadows crossing the image of the notes are definitely part of the film noir style. And the action is in a Midwestern city, as we have learned is an often-used location for film noir.

 

-- Why is a heist a good subject for a film noir to tackle? Put another way, how or why might a film that involves a heist affect or change what we think about criminals and/or criminal behavior on screen? This opening scene shows the would-be criminal is very attentive to detail and very careful in his planning – not just a fly-by-night small-time crook. So we are paying more attention to this subject, due to its treatment in film noir. And the notes in the beginning suggest that we should have respect for a man who “conceived and executed a ‘perfect crime.” As Shannon Clute mentioned in the “Hitch-hiker” podcast, we may be expected to identify with the criminal, rather than his victim.

 

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For me, the defining characteristic of a film noir is that it must portray people who are doomed, no matter what they try to do.

 

These doomed people can be career criminals, or they could be non-criminal average Joes who just happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time (and have a satchel of cash thrown into their car).

 

As a sub-genre of crime movies, heist movies are definitely appropriate for films noir. My favorite noir heist film is Stanley Kramer's "The Killing," which is about a racetrack heist. "Kansas City Confidential," like all heist films, involves careful planning as a critical success factor, and so it has plenty of references to clocks and timing. 

 

But planning, timing, and clocks do not a noir film make. The series of "Ocean's" films about casino heists are all heavy on planning, timing, and clocks, but none of them are films noir. The original, "Ocean's 11," a "Rat Pack" movie, has even been characterized as a "lighthearted romp."

 

Doomed is the difference. Film noir heists involve doomed people and unhappy endings. Lighthearted romp heists involve wise-cracking personalities and happy endings. 

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Kansas City Confidential  as a mock “true crime” film succeeds as a noir film chiefly because  it appeals to prurient desires of the audience. Noir is at its best when the audience feels like it’s peering through a window at desperate and private moments.

Throughout the history of art and literature auteurs have tried to make their stories more “real.” The challenge is in how the term “real” is defined. Michelangelo’s figures were theoretically more realistic than Egyptian statues. On the other hand, Michelangelo’s David is a gorgeous, muscular, fourteen foot tall naked guy.  You don’t see too many of them in “real” life. The surrealists attempted to represent dreams which seem anything but real, but is the unconscious realm any less real than the conscious realm?

So, is Kansas City Confidential any more real than the Maltese Falcon? I would say it’s no more real than the reality television of today, but both offer the pretense of reality.

You don’t watch Kansas City Confidential because you’re expecting a well told story; instead you expect the visceral unvarnished truth (which you don’t actually get, but that’s beside the point).

The producers are turning a negative into a positive. By eschewing the typical noir shadows and angles, they needn’t be bothered with costly art or style. Now that cameras are able to be taken on location, who needs the expense of building a set? Instead, the producers want you to believe that their straightforward approach shot on location is more “real.”

Let’s face it, even the most earnest documentary is far from “real.” But the pretense of really making a real story is very alluring; You gotta love that.

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The documentary style opening lends itself well to the film noir style of "Kansas City Confidential". Even the title seems lurid and sensational.

 

The emphasis on time is a common noir element. In "D.O.A.", for instance, the protagonist, Bigelow, was working against the clock to find his own murderer.

 

Heists are great subjects for film noir, for various reasons. Among them are the criminal element, the desire to make money fast, the emphasis on timing and calculation, and the knowledge that the heist will no doubt fail (as suggested by the opening titles), leading to imprisonment or death for the conspirators.

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The opening minutes of the film deal heavily with time as a major component. whether it's looking at watches, double checking arrival times or even looking out for an arrival and departure, time is a centerpiece of the early moments of the film. The idea of time as a way to establish tension and build anxiety is used beautifully here.

 

the noi elements include the opining scenes where only see  partial face. Also the lighting and cadence of  the dialogue is in the vein of films noir.

 

Heist films are great for the genre because it opens up the door for characters who are not black and white. It also is not a morality tale of good or bad. it's more complex and more intricate. Hesit films also have a structure whereby the story can start, progress and then stop end in a relatively easy manner. This allows some wiggle room for the middle part of the story and the character development.

 

The heist film often affects what people think of the characters they see on screen. As a result the genre lends itself to dpper plot and character development. development

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  I watched this clip this morning and thought, "what bank robber would keep a written record of such incredibly simple observations and provide evidence if found?" All the director had to do was show the guy watch the delivery truck and the armored car, glance at his watch and nod his head or maybe make a check mark then destroy the paper, without the "delivery truck" "armored car" giveaways.

 Instead, the paper is a blueprint that screamed, "conviction!!"

 But what do I know? I'm just a criminal defense attorney with years of experience who knows successful and unsuccessful bank robbers. I'm sure Hollywood has technical advisors to tell the director what to spoon feed the audience so we can figure out this is a big carefully planned heist. 

 

  Sorry. End of suspension of disbelief. This cheap flick lost me in the opening minutes. 

  I can handle low budget, not insultingly bad writing. Leave this one off the list. 

  Check.

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I enjoyed the documentary like beginning and then the tension ridden timing and calculating with the checkmarks on the paper.  A lot of clocks are shown.  It reminds me of the Kubrick's third film entitled THE KILLING wth Sterling Hayden gathering a group to create a diversion and then rob the take from a racetrack. 

 

I will try to watch Kansas City Confidential  film this evening. 

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We see the mastermind of a heist planning the timetable for the caper... I love the camera angles: The wide shot from above showing the people gathered for the bank's opening. The cut to the plans with the events' timetable listed as the mastermind ticks off the events. I would've liked an OTS shot of the mastermind looking out the window at the bank entrance below to establish just that much more continuity... But Technical limitations were what they were back when this film was shot.

 

Capers and heists always make good fodder for Films Noir! Generally speaking, characters of questionable moral fortitude are brought together and greed eventually gets the better of the more fiendish members of the groups. Drama, intrigue, deceit and violence inevitably follow.

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No dialogue in this clip, but actions speak louder than words.

 

Timing indeed can be everything, as seen in this clip. The boss has everything in sync with his own watch. When the bank opens, the delivery guys dropping off goods, the security guys picking up loot, everything counts when it comes to pulling off a heist. The boss has obviously been watching this on a daily basis as he checks off the number of times all these events occur.

 

We all think it might go right, but since this is the film noir world, we can't wait to see how it will go awry. OR WILL IT?!  The teaser in the prologue might tell us otherwise.....

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As listed in the opening titles of Kansas City Confidential the purpose of this film is to expose the operations of a man who conceived and executed a "perfect crime" of which the details are not available anywhere else (except in this movie).  The audience is primed to closely watch how this precision heist is planned down to the minute, exact locations where all the participants will be and the paths they will take as well as where and when vehicles will be located.  Thus timing is the key to this plan which is worked out in great detail using blue-print styled details of  the streets, the buildings and time logs of where and when the armored car, delivery truck and squad car all arrive and depart. The scene is shot mostly as a point-of-view from the plans' mastermind as a "dry run" of the crime scene as it would play out before us. 

 

Film noir elements include a documentary style shooting order, streets framed in diagonal as opposed to horizontal lines and a tension building music score emphasizing the serious nature of what is happening on the screen.  By using a heist for the subject and in particular the planning stage of such a crime this gives us an insight to the criminal mind with the work and details behind the actual execution of the crime rather than the action itself.  When we hear or read of a failed robbery, this type of film would answer the question, "What were they thinking?"  Kansas City Confidential will tell you!  On paper it looked pretty good!  ...don't try this at home!    

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  • Discuss the role of time and timing in this scene.

 

To me, I believe that time and timing are the central theme of this scene. Everything is based on how each of character reacts in regard to time and the timing of their schedules.

 

  • What are the film noir elements (style or substance) that you notice in the opening of this film?

 

To me, there are a few film noir elements that I noticed about this opening scene.

 

First, the expository intertitles and their semi-documentary realist style stands out as this film being one of the byproducts of the film noir universe.

 

Secondly, the framing and camera movements also borrow from the film noir style.

 

For example, when the film’s protagonist looks down from his window toward the bank, the camera follows his line of sight from the bank’s name window to the clock they have posted near by. To me, this allows the audience to visualize the protagonist’s point-of-view.

 

  • Why is a heist a good subject for a film noir to tackle? Put another way, how or why might a film that involves a heist affect or change what we think about criminals and/or criminal behavior on screen?

 

To me, I believe that heist films allow the audience to gain an understanding behind why the criminals and/or criminal decides to commit their crime. To me, this goes beyond the newspaper articles we see everyday and it gives you the means along with the motives for their behavior.

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Time and timing appear to be crucial in this film, as the heist that will take place apparently needs to happen within a small window of time. The music is the most noir aspect I saw, as it builds tension and implies upcoming drama. Crime is a big aspect of noir, so the heist film fits right in. Noir sometimes likes to toy with the idea of the perfect crime, and seeing as how this heist needs to happen in a certain amount of times, things have to go perfect. 

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       My first impression of this opening scene is that time is of the essence, so to speak, for this perfect crime to take place. In any heist, the possibility of success is contingent on the exact timing of the arrival, robbery and getaway. For this heist,all aspects are meticulously planned by the well dressed Tom Foster as he observes the myriad of activities related to the bank from the window across the street. He especially keeps a "watchful" eye on his watch and the clock on the bank door.Tom maintains an impressive daily log and checklist of the arrival and departure of; an armored car, a florist delivery truck and police squad car. The audience is led to believe that the perfect planning we are witnessing is the basis for the perfect crime described in the opening credits. We know better.

      The elements and substance of noir I noticed are the tense police drama kind of music, the interesting P.O.V. that truly involves the audience in this caper from the planning stages on. We get to learn how a criminal's mind operates. the possible noir themes are greed, deception violence and crime.

      Heist films like Kansas City Confidential,The Killers, The Asphalt Jungle are filled with tension, intrigue and "I Spy" type of intelligence schemes. The viewer is enveloped with the action and starts to admire or sympathize the brains behind the operation and temporarily forgets the criminal and moral element.

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It is all about the timing in this opening scene from "Kansas City Confidential." A man is watching a bank from a window high above across the street. Silently he watches with a steel gaze, checking the clock on the bank as well as his watch. He is timing the arrival and departures of the police, a delivery man and an armored car. He hits the timer button on his watch twice and checks off the times on a large sheet of paper. It is a painstaking process but everything is precise and timed to the second. It appears to all be going according to plan.

 

This short segment is intriguing because it is silent, yet the man's actions speak volumes. The opening crawl acts as a silent narration to set up the story in a realist manner. To that point, the crawl talks about lurid chapters in the annals of the KC police department of those brought to punishment, but that this film was meant to expose one criminal who executed the perfect crime. It's very enticing. Cut to the words Kansas City in large letters across the screen. It feels like news reel footage, another hallmark of realist noir.

 

The heist is a good topic for noir because we get to see the motives of various characters and that gives interesting looks into their minds. Heists also usually have multiple elements with a many things that can go wrong and that increases the tension. These films also carry noir themes like greed, revenge, mistrust and threats.

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Timing is everything as Tim Foster synchronizes his watch as he records the comings and goings by the back. The music (which during the. crawl sounded a but like Dragnet) had a tick-tock quality to it, as if it was markigm time to. Everything has to go perfectly well for a heist to be successful but as we have seen in this course, something always happens to throw things awry. Murphy's Law rules the noir universe.

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It’s pretty well lit for a noir film.  However, the shifting camera angles, with the center of attention, are off center of the screen, falls in the noir style.  And if I didn’t know better, the music sounds like it inspires the music for Dragnet (Gasp!  Television, I know).  I do like when the armor car arrives, the audience watches along with Tim, a nice angle shot over his shoulder; dynamic camera angles make me think noir.

 

 

 

 

I too thought the background music was "borrowed"... "heisted" from Dragnet.  Since Dragnet was a popular police/crime drama as a radio series back in 1949, then maybe we need to acknowledge the radio dramas as having a strong influence on the noir style of movie making!  

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I love this course, and one of my favorite things about it is these Daily Doses of Darkness. It's really sad this course is coming to an end in a few days, but till then we have plenty to discuss about.

 

 

 

 

Agreed this has been an amazingly fun, thought provoking class & I am also feeling a Noir angst that it's coming to an end! 

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       My first impression of this opening scene is that time is of the essence, so to speak, for this perfect crime to take place. In any heist, the possibility of success is contingent on the exact timing of the arrival, robbery and getaway. For this heist,all aspects are meticulously planned by the well dressed Tom Foster as he observes the myriad of activities related to the bank from the window across the street. He especially keeps a "watchful" eye on his watch and the clock on the bank door.Tom maintains an impressive daily log and checklist of the arrival and departure of; an armored car, a florist delivery truck and police squad car. The audience is led to believe that the perfect planning we are witnessing is the basis for the perfect crime described in the opening credits. We know better.

      The elements and substance of noir I noticed are the tense police drama kind of music, the interesting P.O.V. that truly involves the audience in this caper from the planning stages on. We get to learn how a criminal's mind operates. the possible noir themes are greed, deception violence and crime.

      Heist films like Kansas City Confidential,The Killers, The Asphalt Jungle are filled with tension, intrigue and "I Spy" type of intelligence schemes. The viewer is enveloped with the action and starts to admire or sympathize the brains behind the operation and temporarily forgets the criminal and moral element.

 

 

The viewer is enveloped with the action and starts to admire or sympathize the brains behind the operation and temporarily forgets the criminal and moral element.

 

Nice observation.   I think you're absolutely correct...we...viewers of the heist film...often identify with the thieves, in whole or in part...and either forget or forgive the fact that they're thieves.   We appreciate the meticulous planning and preparation, and the more audacious the scheme the more we embrace it.  

 

I mentioned in an earlier post that beating the system or proving oneself smarter than everyone else seemed an irresistible lure in many heist films, but your comment above prompted me to think of a piece of dialogue from Three Days of the Condor.  

 

It's near the end of the film, and the freelance assassin Joubert, played by Max Von Sydow, tells Joe Turner, (Robert Redford) a target he had been contracted to kill but is no longer hunting, that the assassination business isn't a bad vocation; there's never a Depression and someone is always willing to pay.  Joubert adds that there is "no need to believe in either side, or any side.  There is no cause.   There is only yourself.  The belief is in your precision."

 

I think that's part of the lure.   Many of these heists, like much of noir, seem to unfold outside of normal time and space.  Convention, law and accepted moral parameters simply do not apply.   There is only the objective...The Great Whatsit...and one's precision in attaining it.   Nothing else matters.   In a very Kierkegaardian way, the Great Whatsit, the money, gems, art or whatever, isn't important.   It's a metaphor for the real objective, but not the objective itself.    

 

The precision, the flawless execution of a flawless plan...perfection...is the real goal, and it's worth more than money, more than gold and jewels, even love and life.   Like the Black Bird, it's the stuff that dreams...and nightmares...are made of.        

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In looking at today's clip from "Kansas City Confidential," I was stuck by the third suggested question. Why is a heist a good subject for film noir?

 

First, it involves criminal activity, which must be a part of any noir film, and since we are following the story from the side of the professional criminal, we are deep into the dark side of life.

 

Heist films take a purportedly realistic approach, familiar in many noir films, but rather than follow the authorities in solving a crime (as in "The Naked City") we see how the crime is planned. As things happen that (inevitably) put the plan at risk, the tension is increased, in a way that doesn't always occur in a police procedural.

 

More importantly, however, in classic Hollywood films of the era, the filmmakers were still working under a Production Code that required that criminals not get away with it. Even though that Code was starting to weaken, you could still be pretty certain no heist in the movies would be a success. Thus, while we get the thrills of watching illicit activity, we know it is doomed to failure. Doomed protagonists are a cornerstone of noir.

 

Even after the Code was eliminated, heist films still tended to end in failure. Was there ever a heist film that ended In success (other than con games and others where the target is worse than the perpetrators (like "The Sting" or "Ocean's Eleven") or spy films (like "Mission: Impossible") or even "Ant-Man")?

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