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Eddie Mueller, Noir Host


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...Is that a Martin guitar?

 

Yeah CG, I think it is.

 

(...and I think that picture of Cagney was taken right after he..ahem.."pulled into Nazareth and was feelin' 'bout half-past dead")

 

;)

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James, I accept your "wow" and I raise you a "wow".

 

Is that a Martin guitar?

 

I believe it is a Martin;  As for a noir host;  Well I don't think TCM could find any man that could stand up to Claire Trevor,  but Ralph Meeker as Hammer is as close as one could get.

 

You're so right about wet noodle Kent Smith but his type of actor did serve a purpose in films like The Dammed Don't Cry.   Not many actors could go toe-to-toe with Crawford,  but Gable held his own.

 

I admit I'm still pondering:  Would I listen to the ravings of an inmate of an asylum, if I were interested in learning about the theme of insanity.

 

But with all sincerity, thanks for making my day with that one.

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I believe it is a Martin;  As for a noir host;  Well I don't think TCM could find any man that could stand up to Claire Trevor,  but Ralph Meeker as Hammer is as close as one could get.

 

You're so right about wet noodle Kent Smith but his type of actor did serve a purpose in films like The Dammed Don't Cry.   Not many actors could go toe-to-toe with Crawford,  but Gable held his own.

 

I admit I'm still pondering:  Would I listen to the ravings of an inmate of an asylum, if I were interested in learning about the theme of insanity.

 

But with all sincerity, thanks for making my day with that one.

A femme fatale and a wet noodle make an ideal couple. That's REAL chemistry

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Hey, Dargo!

 

Isn't it amusing how some people think that the "Nazareth" of the song is about folks looking for an inn and a manger, when it is really just about travelling to Pennsylvania to visit a guitar factory?

Martins Forever!

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....I see the sycophants, I see the hopefuls, I see the die-hards, I see the self-serving victims and I see the true noir aficianados...not afraid to buck the crowd, in many of the posts. Don't hate me for being bad, just hate me as I can take it. Now that is the kind of female host from the rabble that you should get ...

 

I purposely misspelled a certain person's name, so that the censors or faithful fannage would not alight in unison to block my post. One doesn't have to go far to remember the host's name is Muller, just like Maude of sweet candy fame. I was also pleased to see that the most tame girlie contingent [the Virginia Huston imitators] came out in full force to praise and give adulation to their potential suitor.

 

Only a few posters were astute enough to get it in the subtext, like someone named EdgeCliffe who I would like to meet in some dark alley someday, but of course packing some heat just in case.

.

 

So kill me, for not being part of the majority, but that's what noir is all about...right? A lone woman going against the grain and the vicissitudes of life, looking for that one great heist or take or time of her life. 

 

Whaaaat?  

C.G., I get it that you're trying to sound all mysterious and noirish and everything. But some of the above post just doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

 

I don't need the person who's talking about a subject to be like the subject. Following this logic, I wouldn't listen to anyone speaking about, say, punk rock, unless they were sporting a mohawk and a few carefully placed safety pins. I wouldn't attend a class on Indian cooking unless the instructor was redolent with cumin. And so on.

 

As for the femme fatale as host idea, I'm tired of everyone blathering on about femmes fatale in film noir. Ya know what, people? There are loads of noirs, really good ones, with no femme fatale at all. She's not an essential ingredient to noir any more than rainy streets and fedoras are.

I love all three of the above (ffs, rainy streets, fedoras), and they do, respectively, all appear in many great film noirs. But people have become fixated on these things, particularly the femme fatale idea. And as I said, there are lots of good noirs with nary an ff within a rain-soaked mile of those dark urban streets.

 

By the way, I like Eddie Muller and I think he's been doing a great job. And I am not a sycophant, hopeful, die-hard, or Kent Smith fan.

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Hey, Dargo!

 

Isn't it amusing how some people think that the "Nazareth" of the song is about folks looking for an inn and a manger, when it is really just about travelling to Pennsylvania to visit a guitar factory?

 

Martins Forever!

 

I knew you'd catch the reference there, CG. ;)

 

(...and with James being a musician, I assumed he caught it too)

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Hey, Dargo!

 

Isn't it amusing how some people think that the "Nazareth" of the song is about folks looking for an inn and a manger, when it is really just about travelling to Pennsylvania to visit a guitar factory?

 

Martins Forever!

 

Well I see you know you're guitars.   I have a Martin and it is just a fantastic guitar.    And to think some folks believe Taylor is a better acoustic guitar!

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So Eddie, I see ya lurking on the thread here, and so let me just say to you that I really enjoyed your wraparounds this time around again and TCM presenting many of these lesser seen films. Hope to see you again and this Noir series of yours become a regular or at least annual occurrence.

 

(...btw, have YOU ever been to Nazareth PA???...sorry, couldn't resist) ;)

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In CRISS CROSS, did Lancaster intend from the beginning to double cross Duryea in the armored car robbery, or did he only decide to do it after Duryea had shot and killed the elderly armored car employee?

Au revoir and thank you, Summer of Darkness and Eddie Mueller, Czar of Noir. Well, that was an outstanding achievement for TCM, which has never done something like this before and hopefully will do it again in the not too distant future.

 

Sadly, back to RO and garbage made after 1960. Sooooooooooooooooooooo sad.

 

Well, at least there's the occasional, very occasional classically classic movie and Ben M. :wub:

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Au revoir and thank you, Summer of Darkness and Eddie Mueller, Czar of Noir. Well, that was an outstanding achievement for TCM, which has never done something like this before and hopefully will do it again in the not too distant future.

 

Sadly, back to RO and garbage made after 1960. Sooooooooooooooooooooo sad.

 

Well, at least there's the occasional, very occasional classically classic movie and Ben M. :wub:

Since you quoted me, I stupidly thought that you were going to answer my question........Incidentally, add Percy Helton, the bartender in CRISS CROSS to the list of best voices in film. 

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Whaaaat?  

C.G., I get it that you're trying to sound all mysterious and noirish and everything. But some of the above post just doesn't make a whole lot of sense.

 

I don't need the person who's talking about a subject to be like the subject. Following this logic, I wouldn't listen to anyone speaking about, say, punk rock,

 

Which reminds me of my favorite indie book shop question, circa 1979:   Why did the punk rocker cross the road?

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In CRISS CROSS, did Lancaster intend from the beginning to double cross Duryea in the armored car robbery, or did he only decide to do it after Duryea had shot and killed the elderly armored car employee?

 

I don't understand why Yvonne de Carlo fell in love with such a stupid guy.

 

yvonne-decarlo-4.jpg

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I don't understand why Yvonne de Carlo fell in love with such a stupid guy.

 

 

 

Anna wasn't in love with anyone.   She went back to Steve for the sex.   This is very clear when she mentions that making up after fighting was the best part of their marriage.    Now why she married Slim is a good question (of course maybe by the 'stupid guy' you meant Slim).

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In CRISS CROSS, did Lancaster intend from the beginning to double cross Duryea in the armored car robbery, or did he only decide to do it after Duryea had shot and killed the elderly armored car employee?

 

I believe that is the million dollar question related to this first rate noir.   I assume Steve (Burt), wasn't going to double cross Slim (Duryea),  but once his friend was killed (after Steve and Slim agreed there would be no killing),   Steve sought revenge in the moment.

 

The lesson here is when hitting an armored car guard,  hit him harder!

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Anna wasn't in love with anyone.   She went back to Steve for the sex.   This is very clear when she mentions that making up after fighting was the best part of their marriage.    Now why she married Slim is a good question (of course maybe by the 'stupid guy' you meant Slim).

 

She married Slim because he was rich.

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Well,according to her bio,she had a real passionate affair with Burt on the set of Criss Cross,Burt was very married at the time....

 

Yeah, and according to the movie extra she's seen dancing with in Duryea's nightclub early on in this movie, Burt may have NOT been the ONLY one she might have had a little affair with about the same time....

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=euYrpg-j54E

 

(...Tony Curtis...what a great storyteller he was...if not exactly one prone to exhibit the most discretion)

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Muller gave CRISS-CROSS a good sell, and I liked it (and want to see it again) but it tested my patience with the hospital scene...and I have to say, I'm not as big a fan of Robert Siodmak as Muller is ( and by this, I mean his resume on a whole, I do think CRISS CROSS was a well-directed film with some nice directotial flourishes as is THE KILLERS.)

 

I do think it pulled everything together really well for the ending though- although, overall, it has a touch of a Radio Suspense drama to it- a set-up where you know from the start that it's going to end bad for the protagonist, the only mystery element being just a matter of how they're gonna get it....Like THE KILLERS, there's kind of a "snuff" quality to it.

 

Muller gives a more critical look at CRISS CROSS in his book DARK CITY, devoting two pages to it and acknowledging its flaws (mainly with concern to suspension of disbelief about some of the harder-to-swallow elements of the film) but he does an interesting comparison of the film to its 1995 remake THE UNDERNEATH, which according to him, explored the motivations of the characters to death and tried too hard to bring the story "down to earth" and mentally digestable for a modern audience.

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