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Eddie Mueller, Noir Host


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It would be wonderful if he could host a Noir of the Week type of show. Something like the (now shopworn) Essentials

What a great idea, Id love that

 

And like others I also thought Eddie Muller was a fantastic host. I loved how knowledgable he was and excited he was about the films he introduced. His enthusiasm was infectious to me.

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What a great idea, Id love that

 

And like others I also thought Eddie Muller was a fantastic host. I loved how knowledgable he was and excited he was about the films he introduced. His enthusiasm was infectious to me.

..and I assume that he writes his own intros, unlike the other hosts.

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As I've mentioned before, Eddie Muller's enthusiastic introductions at festivals such as Noir City and TCM have done a lot to make me a dedicated noir fan.  He does a great job calling attention to highlights and reasons to see even the more pedestrian titles.  He has a way of conveying that there is nothing more fun you could be doing at this moment than watching the next film on the schedule, and the depth of his knowledge also adds context.  I'm really delighted to see him have this chance to do the same thing on TCM and hope he'll return.

 

For that matter, I'd love to see Eddie's Film Noir Foundation colleague Alan K. Rode, who appears in one of the little between-movies film noir featurettes on TCM, have a chance to host as well.  Alan is equally fun, congenial, and knowledgeable and he's an all-around nice guy.

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As I've mentioned before, Eddie Muller's enthusiastic introductions at festivals such as Noir City and TCM have done a lot to make me a dedicated noir fan.  He does a great job calling attention to highlights and reasons to see even the more pedestrian titles.  He has a way of conveying that there is nothing more fun you could be doing at this moment than watching the next film on the schedule, and the depth of his knowledge also adds context.  I'm really delighted to see him have this chance to do the same thing on TCM and hope he'll return.

 

For that matter, I'd love to see Eddie's Film Noir Foundation colleague Alan K. Rode, who appears in one of the little between-movies film noir featurettes on TCM, have a chance to host as well.  Alan is equally fun, congenial, and knowledgeable and he's an all-around nice guy.

Interesting that the nice, fun guys gravitate to noir, which does not have nice, fun characters.

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"Interesting that the nice, fun guys gravitate to noir, which does not have nice, fun characters."

 

Very true. I used to not like noir so much because of the darkness, but the people who liked noir were so engaging and enthused I started to enjoy the movies themselves more and attend more of them.

 

The irony of people being brought together by dark movies has not escaped comment at Noir City festivals.  At a Noir City screening a couple of years ago actress Marsha Hunt told an adoring crowd "We're all just a big film noir family!"

 

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The irony of people being brought together by dark movies has not escaped comment at Noir City festivals.  At a Noir City screening a couple of years ago actress Marsha Hunt told an adoring crowd "We're all just a big film noir family!"

 

I wonder if there is some deep psychological reason for this?

 

Noir films remind me of dreams... nightmares. Could we like them so much because the bad things are happening to other people instead of us? Bad things always happen to us in our own nightmares.

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I wonder if there is some deep psychological reason for this?

 

Noir films remind me of dreams... nightmares. Could we like them so much because the bad things are happening to other people instead of us? Bad things always happen to us in our own nightmares.

 

I love noir films for fairly simple reasons:  They're always entertaining, they feature memorable characters and character actors, and they're nearly always set in the urban present with the past depicted only in flashbacks.  There are no stupid costumes, no horses,  no historical revisionism, and nobody running around singing for no apparent reason like a chicken with his head cut off.*  It's the perfect genre.

 

* No one would ever confuse Rita Hayworth singing "Put the blame on Mame" with a chicken running around with his head cut off. I am an expert on that distinction.

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Andy, if you haven't seen the Dennis Potter BBC mini series The Singing Detective with Michael Gambon I would highly recommend it.  Not to be confused with the terrible movie of the same name with Robert Downey, Jr.

The characters spontaneously break into song all of the time.  And they sing to playback of the original recordings.  But as it is all a drug induced hallucination for once the musical aspect works.

A true noir musical.

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I think it's true there's a certain cathartic pleasure in watching characters make choices which we're too nice or smart to make -- that can be true of any drama.

 

It goes deeper than that, though.  I enjoy noir on so many levels.  For instance, as a native Californian I'm fascinated by old Los Angeles locations such as Bunker Hill and the Bradbury Building or the streets of Glendale (I'm thinking of CRIME WAVE for Glendale) -- they're little bits of history frozen in time.  When I walk in the Bradbury Building, it's quite a thrill to think of M ('51) or I, THE JURY or the other movies filmed there.

 

There's also the costumes, the casts, the great dialogue.  I sat next to William Bowers' widow at a screening this year and she told me "He didn't know he was writing noir!"  LOL.

 

When you watch and learn about a lot of film noir, there's also a pleasure that extends beyond the film being immediately watched.  For instance, what film noir fan isn't thrilled when Charles McGraw and William Conrad enter the picture in THE KILLERS?  They may be playing scary hit men but we relate to them not just as their characters but because of what they represent about the genre as a whole, and we think of the other films in which we've enjoyed them, playing both villains and heroes.

 

Just some random thoughts on enjoying film noir!

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OK, I get it. You both speak French. I don't. I feel like an ignoramus. Now we can move on.

 

Yeah, but don't ya suddenly have a craving for a glass of PINOT noir(not to be confused with film noir, of course) and maybe some cheese and crackers???

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Il aide a savoir la Francaise surtout si l'on est historien du film noir, Dargo.

 

Voila la fromage!

 

Yeah...well...Liberté, égalité, fraternité, right back at ya there, lady! ;)

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That would be Dargot........

 

LOL

 

(...yeah, like that superfluous 't' there is gonna fly with a guy who ALREADY takes issue with all those superfluous 'u's the Brits and Canadians use in THIS language!!!) ;)

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As I've mentioned before, Eddie Muller's enthusiastic introductions at festivals such as Noir City and TCM have done a lot to make me a dedicated noir fan.  He does a great job calling attention to highlights and reasons to see even the more pedestrian titles.  He has a way of conveying that there is nothing more fun you could be doing at this moment than watching the next film on the schedule, and the depth of his knowledge also adds context.  I'm really delighted to see him have this chance to do the same thing on TCM and hope he'll return.

 

For that matter, I'd love to see Eddie's Film Noir Foundation colleague Alan K. Rode, who appears in one of the little between-movies film noir featurettes on TCM, have a chance to host as well.  Alan is equally fun, congenial, and knowledgeable and he's an all-around nice guy.

I have seen many of the interviews on You Tube of the NOIR CITY film noir interviews. They conversations are always interesting and imformative. Eddie Muller does some of the interviews in his kind and gracious manner. The most recent interview I watched was Alan Rode`s interview with Julie Adams. She was a contract player for Universal in the early 1950`s, and the interview was conducted by  Alan Rode. They discussed Julie`s early life, and Universal signing her as a contract player in the early 1950`s. Three of the movies talked about were BEND OF THE RIVER 1952, CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON 1954, and SLAUGHTER ON TENTH AVENUE 1957. Alan makes the actor or actress at ease, and he asks many of the questions that I am interested in learning. I have also seen his interviews with Barbara Hale, Norman Lloyd, and June Lockhart. In 2012 the biography of Charles McGraw Biography Of A Tough Guy was published. Alan was the author.

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