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Dr. Rich Edwards

Daily Dose of Darkness #27: A Handy Man (Opening Scene of Beware, My Lovely)

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This Daily Dose continues with this week's theme "Final Clues and Last Words."

 

The Daily Dose will be delivered by TCM via email on Wednesday, July 22, 2015.

 

The Daily Dose is available at Canvas at: https://learn.canvas.net/courses/748/pages/daily-dose-of-darkness-number-27-july-22-2015

 

Let the discussions begin!

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"Final Clues and Last Words." :  


 


It looks like the last words of whoever that lady was in the closet were:  "FOR HOWARD $5.00.  and I suspect that, that ain't all folks.


 


Describe the noir elements, in terms of style and substance, in this opening sequence.


When asked for this, I am sorry, there is something in this ? or thread that I must not fully understand...but I don't know what it is exactly.....I have not been able to wrap my brain around this ?  or answer it every time it is asked.....style and substance?  I don't get that....if anyone can help me out on that...please let me know...thanks.


-- What do you make of the film opening with the Salvation Army band playing and the prominent Salvation Army sign in that first shot?  


Puritanical neighborhood, community....and they won't let a woman stuffed in a closet, dead, go unpunished.....


-- Even though it is set in 1918, how does this scene reveal some of the typical noir themes of the 1950s?


Home values and that punishment for wrongs was strictly enforced at all times.


 


#NOIRSUMMER


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Describe the noir elements, in terms of style and substance, in this opening sequence.

-   Style:   The trombone is held at a downward angle.  Robert Ryan is revealed in deep focus between the moving cymbals*. Ryan’s face is obscured the window screen*.  The first closet door is in your face but we see Ryan in the small mirror*.  The closet door shot is repeated (adding tension) on another closet just before Ryan’s world changes for the worse. As Ryan goes inside, he throws shadows.  When he approaches and enters the next room (and bad luck), the shadows are larger and more pronounced.  After the Salvation Army band music stops, there is no music until Ryan opens Door Number Two.  When he opens the screen door to escape, there are angled disorienting shadows.  Steam comes from the bucket in the sink.  The door swinging open to reveal the corpse*[I’m guessing she is probably NOT the femme fatale ...].  Low angle shot of Ryan running along a bldg.  The train tracks are at angles across the screen. Smoke from the train and the extreme close-up of the drive wheel.

* These seem to be quite innovative stylistic items rather than a parody or burlesque of noir, considering that this film is chronologically the backside of the hill, so to speak.

    Substance:  The alternately moving cymbals may represent something else—are the cymbals slicing him?  It is danger nonetheless.  Ryan is a regular guy just trying to survive in the world.  Fate is random, cruel, and can put its hand on anyone’s shoulder.

 

What do you make of the film opening with the Salvation Army band playing and the prominent Salvation Army sign in that first shot?

- My only guess, based on the opening, (I’ve not seen this film) is that Ryan either got his job with help from the Salvation Army, or is working directly for them.  The sign seems to provide foreshadowing; 'Kindness', the 'pot boiling'.

Even though it is set in 1918, how does this scene reveal some of the typical noir themes of the 1950s?

- One man alone against the world, as depicted by 1) The cymbals covering then revealing him repeatedly in the background as the percussionist plays. 2) Ryan as a small figure running in the train yard surrounded by tens if not hundreds of freight cars.  The Regular Joe just surviving; Ryan is a handyman working in a woman’s house.

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Here's the train again. Now however, it is the escape route. That's enough about the train. The concept of existentialism, and the absurdity of a situation being placed upon a character is now placed upon the viewer. What the hell is happening? He is a handyman, employee of Mrs. Warren, who is found dead. Why run? what has he got to feel guilty for? 

 

I love the obsessiveness of having to scratch that mud off the window or screen. This is an allusion to an equally tedious and difficult task within the film. In this clip you don't get the idea that noir style is at it's end. Sure there is a production date but when you consider the time period of the actual film you have to adjust. 1918 is just after  WW I. The same kind of disillusionment and persecution was going on. Robert Ryan's character dumps out the blackened water of the bucket, only to fill it with his hasty escape as he finds Mrs. Warren dead. Perhaps murdered. By him. 

 

The Salvation Army playing is also a foreshadowed image. There are many in need as we rebound out of WW I. The same sort of escape is evident. The same sort of speculation amongst relative strangers is evident. The same noir elements are present: a lone man working for peanuts and a place to stay. He runs, something is definitely incriminating him here. There must be a past with Mrs. Warren that would make him run. Normally one would go to the police. The evidence of his behavior in this clip is that he's been trying to keep his nose clean (and his surroundings) for a long time, but something slipped this morning. Just like in the timing aspects of The Big Clock, or in Kansas City Confidential, this is going to play out as part of the evidence. Why is a man mopping for a woman? Because he can't acclimate to society. 

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As if one sign of The Salvation Army is not enough, we have two in close-up in this opening scene of Beware My Lovely, something that was more common in the postwar 1950s culture than in 1918. We then have that image followed up with a repetitive crash of clapping cymbals in our face. This loud unsettling sound is contrasted with the quietude of R. Ryan's character, alone in a house, doing "woman's" work. The confronting roles of masculinity are in play here (and out of sorts with 1918) with him cleaning windows, mopping, etc. The dripping faucet is a nagging thing but more subdued than the outside boom while also foreshadowing more disturbing running water to come. 

 

Recently, I visited a Hollywood Costumes exhibit at LACMA, and one of the most valuable things I took from that experience is that the art of the costume design of a period piece could never be completely separate from the time/era in which it was created. In other words, the stylistic portrayal of Cleopatra of the 30s was drastically different from that of the 60s, with the 30s version being more consistent with the aesthetic of the Egyptian culture (as it was naturally more in style at that time). Over the years, the sixties version, looks, well too sixties and dated. The same could be said of this clip supposedly set in the early 20th century exhibiting many styles and societal importances of a different era.

 

Beware My Lovely is also ahead of it's time. I now believe Hitchcock owes a great deal of his success in Psycho to this film. It's almost a carbon copy; a dead woman on the floor with a close up of her face, running water left ON (seriously the most agitating thing ever) and then the male just leaving the scene.  Running away; another male-in-crisis motif made more uncomfortable with visual and audible elements of the running water abandoned (as well as this lifeless human).

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Hell yes, this opener is fantastic! I haven't seen the film yet, so I'm definitely more enticed to see after this amazing opener. From the subtle creativity of that opener with Ryan and the net in front of him to the innocuous build up that leads to a horrible discovery, it's all masterfully done. Similar almost to the facade of calm that drove the iconic opener of M (1931), this picture thrives off of much of the synthetic safeness here. The moment Ryan opens that door and the horror on his face is plastered in your brain, you know this is the kind of noir that's going to play it right. Through pacing, tone, and manipulation, this thing hits even harder when we see the victim then if we had just be shown off the bat. The boiling water is eerily brilliant, it's such a great little addition to the scene that it's chilling.

 

The overhead shots of Ryan running in the train yard are an expansive contrast to the cramped claustrophobia of his shack, and yet he feels more suffocated than ever - only in a film noir! Also on a side note because I just thought of it, Robert Ryan would've been an amazing Mike Hammer. He fits all the ticks of Mickey Spillane's novels, and he would've been the perfect age in the 50's; what a waste. Throw him in a Hammer movie with Marie Windsor as Velda and you've got some noir perfection. Anyway, excuse the rambling just wanted to throw that out there!

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In terms of style, I must make a notation of blending Ryan's frightened expression with the oncoming train, and its wheels, while heightening the film's sounds. This seemingly implies a state of paranoia. Ryan is rattled by his recent encounter of the dead homeowner's body, as anyone would be, but his actions following the discovery are what lead to suspicion. Perhaps actually seeing the dead body reveals some kind of truth for Ryan, and his frazzled appearance at the end of the scene is him arriving at some sort of conclusion, which will be revealed to us within later scenes.

 

The scene opening on a Salvation Army band and sign is rather interesting. This charitable organization is widely known for aiding those in need. The shot transitions from the Salvation Army's street setup to Ryan helping around a woman's house. The band's music even plays over a few shots as Ryan does housework. He puts up a window screen (neatly placed in the window's corner is a "To-Do" list,) and begins putting away supplies he's used while cleaning. The blending of the Salvation Army and Ryan's actions is an attempt in establishing him as a good person.

 

However, upon seeing the homeowner lying dead in a closet, Ryan flees. A murder has been committed, and his first instinct is to flee? He never even attempted to help in any way. Is he involved in some way? Is someone looking for him, and killed the homeowner as a way of sending a message? Plenty of questions come to mind.

 

There is clearly a prominent theme of dread/doom within this film. The opening scene implies Ryan is a good man, but he flees upon the discovery of a dead body, and then appears frightened beyond belief, hinting on paranoia. It seems as though Ryan is the stark contrast within this film noir. He is possibly the one casting those threatening shadows, which ironically bring him such great fear. I bet this will be a very intriguing film.

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From this short clip I would have placed Robert Ryan as a returning WW1 veteran (the war officially ended a month before the month shown on the calendar) with PTSD, which is one of the only ways you could understand his actions. The crashing cymbals and the "army" outside put me in mind of the conflict recently ended: the clashing noise echoing shells bursting around our protagonist. 

 

The emptying of the bucket was ominous too. Am I alone in thinking it looked too much like blood, it was so dark and viscous? Then Ryan finds a body and runs: he knows she's dead, he doesn't hang around to check if she's okay (though he should have, you can clearly see her blink!). Is it the run of the guilty, or the run of the traumatized who has seen too much death in Europe? Noir and time will tell. 

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It only took me these first three minutes of Harry Horner's Beware, My Lovely to understand that Robert Ryan's character is not a common man. Maybe his acting style is too much for the role, making us confound his circumstancial disturbance with a deeper kind of histeria, or maybe he actually is a mentally deranged person, a dangerous man who's even capable of killing.

We can find this type of character - "an alienated man bordering on psychosis" - in a lot of films noir. Other noir elements, such as visual motifs belonging to the noir imagery, are the insistence of framing devices such as windows, mirrors and doorways, suggesting that we should put this apparently normal character into perspective (I actually was amazed by two shots in the opening of the film: when Ryan's character puts the framed in the window - as "framing himself" to the viewer - and obcessively tries to clean a dark spot, and the one where we see Ryan putting his coat on, with the door blocking the view and the image only being projected in the mirror behind him); we also have an escape without explanation - he runs away without motif, because he is in shock, or he actually is guilty of the murder? - running over the train rails shown through bird-view shots with a lot of smoke, making the image more difficult to understand. Well, even if we don't know if he's guilty, where's smoke, there's fire.
I don't know much about the Salvation Army, but someone pointed out somewhere in this message board an idea that made a lot of sense for me: that, being the Salvation Army a charitable organization that aids those in need, the shot transition in the begining of the film, from the Salvation Army's street setup to Ryan's character helping around a woman's house, while this band's music is still audible as he does the housework, puts in place a contrast that plays with stereotypes. Even if he is what is called a "handyman", prepared to do the kind of physical housework a woman can't easily do, there's something too feminin in his careful and perfectionist way to handle things. Besides, I think it's rather interesting that, instead of being among the other men, he's in the place where women should be.
The film's being set in 1918 but having been made in 1952 is also relevant, if we consider that both times were post-war, and consequently we can transpose some of the negative feelings that are typical noir themes of the 1950's (social malaise, masculinity crisis, fear of foreign and fear of another war, disillusionment and persecution) to the 1918's setting. 
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The Salvation Army sets the time frame as near Christmas even though it's sunny.  The calendar on the window sill also sets the time as December.

 

A '50s noir element would be "an ordinary guy being thrust into a horrible situation through no fault of his own.  Once again we have a train rolling on its track to an inevitable end.

 

There are some psychological influences.  Robert Ryan is excessively freaked out.  Is he WWI veteran?  Is he a parolee? What caused him to run instead of calling the cops?  Distrust of the system that permeated the 1950's noir.

 

One thing that freaked me out, as I was trying to see if Mrs. Warren(?) was murdered or it was just an accident, she blinked.  (She's no Janet Leigh)

 

Also on a side note, the curtain pull that moved when he blew on the screen... we had those same pulls on our curtains when I was a kid.  Major flashback!

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The same kind of disillusionment and persecution was going on. Robert Ryan's character dumps out the blackened water of the bucket, only to fill it with his hasty escape as he finds Mrs. Warren dead. Perhaps murdered. By him. 

 

Wow! There's a thought that didn't occur to me.  That would definitely put a different spin on things.

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"Beware, My Lovely" does not start out as a typical film noir.  We are told it is 1918 and the Christmas season.  The Salvation Army Band and the sign reading "From the Kindness of your Heart" and "Christmas Cheer" does not generate tension. 

 

A man is seen cleaning a screen.  He could be the home owner.  There is a shot of a calendar on the inside of the screen which reinforces the date, December 1918.  Once the character enters the house he start to call for Mrs. Warren.  We know he has been hired to do work by the money that is left for him and that his name is Howard.  As Howard continues to call for Mrs. Warren tension starts to build when she does not answer.  Then he opens the closet door , the music starts and he slowly backs out of the door with a look of horror on his face.  He then runs out of the house and we are slowly shown what he has seen.  Now we feel the tension.

 

Once again, train tracks are used.  This time as he tries to make his escape.  There is a maze of them crisscrossing each other.  Perhaps representing choices to be made or the inside of his mind.  As he speeds away in the boxcar an image of a train speeding onward runs through his head.  We are in the land of film noir.

 

It has been several years since I have seen this film.  Like "Lady in the Lake", using Christmas as the time the film is set makes it different..  I don't want to do a spoiler alert but there is one scene, or should I say shot, that to me is quite memorable.

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-- Describe the noir elements, in terms of style and substance, in this opening sequence.

 

This one is not a favorite of mine, I'll probably never watch it again. But Noir elements are overhead shots in rail yard, the transitions from box car to driving wheels to approaching steam locomotive.

 

-- What do you make of the film opening with the Salvation Army band playing and the prominent Salvation Army sign in that first shot?

 

Product placement, lol.

 

-- Even though it is set in 1918, how does this scene reveal some of the typical noir themes of the 1950s?

 

Dead body, man running from possible consequences.

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Yes, the opening is a bit "noir overdone." The noir films I like have a more natural, less deliberately structured movement to them. Noir films may have been getting more production money by this time, but they compromised in the process. However, you can see noir elements in the on location shooting and the angles created by the railway yard. But, the shadows are gone, the 1950s "cleanliness" is featured. Most importantly, in earlier noir a whole background story could be given in the opening. You knew, essentially, what was going on and could pick up from there. This film the viewer is left wondering, "Okay, there's a murder, but what is going on with the guy?" I think earlier noir, the more raw noir, would not have created that tension in the storytelling. The director tries to calm us a bit by showing the superimposition of the train running through Ryan's head, but that is forced symbolism in a way earlier noir would not have had to do.

 

The same goes for the Salvation Army opening. As a viewer you are left wondering, "What's up?" You have no idea what this opening has to do with the plot.

 

I would not have guessed this film was set in 1918. To me, it immediately screamed early 1950s suburbia.

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A man who could be an ex-con doing chords while he is under parole or maybe while he is running away from justice. His reaction, his surprise, could be real... or maybe the response of a psychopath who doesn't remember he is the culprit.  

 

The salvation army elements incorporated at the very beginning preannounces a sense of doom to the following scene and the need of "someone" to be saved.

 

Whether he is guilty of this murder or not, because of his actions in the past, it seems that he isn't able to face police again.

 

I saw and perceived many elements that were going to be picked up by Mr.Hitchcock years later in "Psycho".

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There is absolutely nothing in this clip (other than the year showing up on the screen) to indicate this scene is taking place in 1918.  If one did not know otherwise, all the action could be taking place in the early 1950s, or most any other time.  What we see does not give us any indication of a "period" look.  Robert Ryan's character could be seen as an "everyman" and the setting could be viewed as an "anytime".  

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The band members are all facing different directions, with their backs to each other.  Bands usually face the same way, showing uniformity and cohesion.  This may be an attempt to show noir confusion.  The bar on the trombone slides in and out, the upper and lower bars framing the face of the man with the cymbals, who seems almost robotic in his playing.   


 


The Salvation Army sign has 2 phrases on it.  "Keep the pot boiling" - foreshadows that there is trouble brewing, and it will continue throughout the film.  "From the kindness of your heart" - After watching the clip a second time, it could refer to the kindness of Mrs. Warren in hiring Howard, the kindness of Howard in his treatment of Mrs. Warren.  Or is it something more - the kindness that Howard has never known in his life.  Or is it a foreshadowing of the kindness and good intentions of people for Mrs. Warren that may end up chasing down and haunting Howard.


 


From the clip, it's hard to see that the scene is from 1918.  There is nothing that differentiates from the 1950s except the dress of the Salvation Army woman.  And the length of it could be ascribed to her beliefs.  Without the large "1918" on the screen and the calendar we're shown, this could easily be the 1950s.  And Ryan's tie - definitely '50s. 


 


I was impressed by Howard's thoroughness in doing his work.  He notices the spot on the screen and works to get it off.  He brings in the mop and bucket, first leaving them by the door, then returning to clean them out.  He notices the hammer lying on the cupboard and puts it in a drawer.  This is a man who likes order and completion.


 


 


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That blackwater was a telling sign of things to come, as he opens the door and you see his facial reaction, you know that he is not expecting what he finds and runs of course, making noir as he goes.

 

The daytime paranoia is especially moving and trains that flashback makes you want more.

 

I cannot watch Robert Ryan without thinking postwar, maybe due to his other movies............

 

The outside scene of him running for the train gives that fifties feel as well, not sure why.

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I agree with the post on this board concerning the observations of film noir style and the parallel between World War 1 and World War 2 veterans.

 

The only thing I have to add is in the final shot. As Ryan sticks his head out of the boxcar we get no sense of movement in either his hair or his clothes. The only movement we feel is the train and the train wheels literally running through his head. It reminded me of old song by Soul Asylum called Runaway Train. There's a line that goes: " Seems like I should be getting somewhere. Somehow I'm neither here nor there." Ryan seems to be in the same predicament. I get the sense by the tension on his face that he will never escape the things he's running from. I don't believe there's any direct connection between the Soul Asylum song and this movie but that's just what my overactive imagination saw.

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This short scene is laughable in so many ways, to point them out may be a matter of stating the obvious.

I suppose the opening shot of the Salvation Army is a way of telling us that it must be December in California and that there are people in need in this otherwise bucolic town. Even though it has already been established that it is December 1918, we see a calendar to reinforce the fact. We also see a “to do” list to help establish that he is a handyman (the length of the list mysteriously grows by the time he gets inside). He then, after supposedly cleaning the screens, lackadaisically scrapes bird droppings off the screen with his finger. Apparently he was cleaning the screens with a mop and a bucket of chocolate syrup because the other items on the list were “rake the yard,” “clean the windows,” and “rubbish.” It looks like he had a towel as well but never actually used it, so he puts it away.

It seems the lady of the house (probably a war widow) left a note that says “$5 dollars” next to a $5 bill for Howard, just in case she would end up dead in the closet before she had a chance to pay him. He pockets the $5 (I’m guessing he will buy the other half of his tie with it) and dumps the chocolate syrup in the sink.

Suddenly dramatic trumpets. Is the Salvation Army now hiding in the closet? No, the lady of the house is on the floor. Dead? Not likely considering that she’s blinking. Does he help her? No. He runs from the house – or judging from the shadows of the lighting equipment outside - should I say sound stage?

So the guy then runs down the street in a panic. I’m guessing that he’s concerned about leaving the water running knowing that California will one day have a terrible drought because of his actions.

He then runs to a futuristic 1950’s train yard and has railroad delusions that Sigmund Freud would probably say are sexual in nature.

In short, any pretense of art is completely gone. This is definitely a make it fast / make it cheap movie.

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It is nice to see an opening to a film I have not seen yet. The film throughs a lot at you in just a few minutes. The noir themes and elements are; a crime - the dead body, man on the run, the opening is a bit light but uses the long over head shot of the train yeard along with the quick cuts to Ryan and the wheels. As far as the Salvation Army playing, my quess is a set up that everythiung is good and ok in the world, then you ge tthe dead body and the race in on.

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One thing that freaked me out, as I was trying to see if Mrs. Warren(?) was murdered or it was just an accident, she blinked.  (She's no Janet Leigh)

 

 

I saw that, too.  Had to replay it to make sure.  Since it was left in the final film, I assume it means that the woman is not dead yet.  So Howard could actually have gone for help - but didn't.  Makes his running even worse.

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This opening doesn’t make sense.  It is beautifully shot:  the black and white is so crisp; the reflection of Robert Ryan in the mirror; the great scenes of the railroad tracks and the train.  But what is going on?  Ok, it’s 1918 and maybe there wasn’t a telephone in the house, although it seems to be a relatively affluent house in a “nice” neighborhood; but why did Robert Ryan run away so horrified?  If he killed the woman, he wouldn’t have had the reaction he did.  If he didn’t kill the woman, pick up the phone, or go outside to the Salvation Army for help, or if you are a local handyman, you should know where the local police station is.  Why did he run away?

 

 

One last thing.  The title of the movie, "Beware, My Lovely," is awful and in itself a parody of film noir. 

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-- Describe the noir elements, in terms of style and substance, in this opening sequence.

 

We learn immediately that the movie will unfold in a peaceful small town neighborhood embarrassing goodness and hope -- far from the darkness of the noir universe. As the music dies down, Howard begins to scratch away a dark blot on the window. He seems puzzled and mildly disgusted. He dumps black mop water which looks like blood. He calls to Mrs. Warren who does not answer. When he opens the closet to stow the mop, we know that he has discovered why she failed to answer.

 

Howard is so frightened by what he sees that he runs away immediately without even turning off the running water. In the noir world, fear is all encompassing. What is in Howard's past that creates such immediate panic? In his haste, did he leave finger prints on the hammer that he put away before he left? He does not even take time to remove the obvious traces of his presence -- his name written on a list and on the note with the $5. Who set this scene? Is it coincidence or did someone know that Howard would be there to innocently fall into a trap? Perhaps Mrs. Warren expected to be out, but can we really believe that such a coincidence would happen in the noir world?

 

In any case, Howard is afraid. He runs toward the rail yard, crossing the tracks and leaps into a boxcar. Where is he headed? What began as a cheerful morning full of hope and salvation and caring has quickly been shadowed by fear.

 

-- What do you make of the film opening with the Salvation Army band playing and the prominent Salvation Army sign in that first shot?

 

Goodness and tranquility is about to be shattered. Perhaps Mrs. Warren has hired Howard in an act of charity. Perhaps he has a past that she was aware of.

 

-- Even though it is set in 1918, how does this scene reveal some of the typical noir themes of the 1950s?

 

Action begins quickly. There is a psychologically intriguing element to Howard's panicked flight which we can expect the movie to explore more fully. The train tracks and train are common noir elements. The speeding locomotive the Howard envisions tells us something about his dark memories or fears.

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Some of the noir elements I saw were the high angle shots of Ryan running through the train yard crossing over the tracks, the superimposed shots of the train wheels and the train headlight over Robert Ryan's face giving the feeling that he can't escape from somthing.  Putting the hammer away seemed meaningful to me, since nothing on the to do list needed a hammer to do it.  Why was it there?  Did he use it to kill the woman in the closet?  Is that why the sign from the Salvation Army is prominent?  "Keep the Pot Boiling" is this murder what is boiling?  Is it going to continue to boil when he arrives at his new destination?

 

I think this scene reveals noir themes from the 50's with this troubled man on the run from something.  Is he a murderer?  Psychotic? Well I guess we'll find out on Friday.

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