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Ok, another technically ignorant question


NipkowDisc
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what does a smileboxed film look like on one of them new curved screen 4k UHD TVs? :)

Smilebox isn't a real format. It's just a digital approximation of what an original 3-strip Cinerama film would look like to somebody sitting in a theater and watching it on a deeply curved screen. I wouldn't think watching it on TV with curved screen wouldn't make much difference.

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I have no idea what smileboxed film or a 4k or a UHD are.

  • SD (standard definition)/DVD =  720 pixels across, 480 pixels high, expressed as 480i, 480p.
  • HD (High Definition) = maximum of 1920 pixels across, or "2K" in commercial market, usually expressed as 1080i or 1080p (vertical resolution) in consumer market
  • UHD (ultra-high-definition) = 4096 pixels across, usually expressed as "4K" in both commercial and consumer markets.

 Both theater versions of 2K and 4K are slightly wider, and thus are known as "Cinema 4K" and "Cinema 2K"

 

330px-Digital_video_resolutions_%28VCD_t

 

2K and 4K are the current theater standards, while 4K and 8K are currently being used for editing. 

 

Without looking it up, there may or may not be 8K theaters at this point, but all that added expense on a standard screen wouldn't be very perceptable beyond the first few rows of seats, if at all.

 

Clear as mud...

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  • SD (standard definition)/DVD =  720 pixels across, 480 pixels high, expressed as 480i, 480p.
  • HD (High Definition) = maximum of 1920 pixels across, or "2K" in commercial market, usually expressed as 1080i or 1080p (vertical resolution) in consumer market
  • UHD (ultra-high-definition) = 4096 pixels across, usually expressed as "4K" in both commercial and consumer markets.

 Both theater versions of 2K and 4K are slightly wider, and thus are known as "Cinema 4K" and "Cinema 2K"

 

330px-Digital_video_resolutions_%28VCD_t

 

2K and 4K are the current theater standards, while 4K and 8K are currently being used for editing. 

 

Without looking it up, there may or may not be 8K theaters at this point, but all that added expense on a standard screen wouldn't be very perceptable beyond the first few rows of seats, if at all.

 

Clear as mud...

 

 

Thanks MovieCollectorOH.  Am I right in saying that the pixels in SD, HD, and UHD are all packed into the same standard area (one square inch?)?  And that is why the picture quality gets better as the pixel count goes up, you have a finer, smaller-grained picture?

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Thanks MovieCollectorOH.  Am I right in saying that the pixels in SD, HD, and UHD are all packed into the same standard area (one square inch?)?  And that is why the picture quality gets better as the pixel count goes up, you have a finer, smaller-grained picture?

 

In real life it isn't really measured per square inch, but pixel count versus total area of screen.  Shrink the screen and you have more pixels per square inch.  Enlarge the screen and you have a lower pixel count per square inch.  So pixels per square inch isn't really a known quantity that we can rely on across the board.

 

If you make the pixels the SAME distance apart from each other for each resolution, and then look at the area that each resolution takes up, then you get that colored diagram.

 

So let's say you take the DVD resolution, and expand it so it takes up the same area as you see the HD or 2K taking up.  Just make them the same size.  Then the pixel count per square inch for DVD resolution really drops, and the picture looks blurry - compared to the HD picture at the same size. 

 

As far as HDTVs go, generally the larger the screen, the higher the quality.  IE some of the smaller HD screens generally don't have higher 1080i resolution, they only go up to 720p - which is also considered "HD".  The larger HD screens not only offer maximum HD resolution, but generally use higher quality components too.  So they are often better all around.

 

TV stations broadcast in either 1080i or 720p.  The 720p offers better motion (useful for sports), but less detail, and the 1080i offers better detail (TCM HD uses this).  It is a compromise.  They both use the same amount of bandwidth.

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As far as HDTVs go, generally the larger the screen, the higher the quality.  IE some of the smaller HD screens generally don't have higher 1080i resolution, they only go up to 720p - which is also considered "HD".  The larger HD screens not only offer maximum HD resolution, but generally use higher quality components too.  So they are often better all around.

 

 

Here is something I noticed recently, and maybe you or someone else can explain this. While watching a movie on a large screen HDTV (like 42 inches or higher), the film appeared as if it were "live," like I was watching a soap opera, for instance. What is going on?

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Here is something I noticed recently, and maybe you or someone else can explain this. While watching a movie on a large screen HDTV (like 42 inches or higher), the film appeared as if it were "live," like I was watching a soap opera, for instance. What is going on?

 

Some people call that "soap opera effect".  A quick look online says that this is due to motion interpolation, as the TV operates at 120 frames per second, and the video is only 29.99 frames per second.  I'm not sure why there is a need to have 120 FPS, but it is there.  The highest HD video framerate is 60 FPS - 720p and 1080p (the latter only on Blu-Ray, streaming video, and video games).

I have read that the effect is also a feature that can be shut off.

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Here is something I noticed recently, and maybe you or someone else can explain this. While watching a movie on a large screen HDTV (like 42 inches or higher), the film appeared as if it were "live," like I was watching a soap opera, for instance. What is going on?

The TV is set to the factory setting, which has everything turned up way too high.  That is appropriate if the TV is used as a display model in a store like Best Buy, because it is battling other television sets, lights, etc.; and, needs to be noticed from across the store.  Once you get it home, you should adjust the set for your space, which, generally, doesn't match an appliance store.  So, it means the brightness and contrast are too high, giving everything a live TV monitor look.

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The TV is set to the factory setting, which has everything turned up way too high.  That is appropriate if the TV is used as a display model in a store like Best Buy, because it is battling other television sets, lights, etc.; and, needs to be noticed from across the store.  Once you get it home, you should adjust the set for your space, which, generally, doesn't match an appliance store.  So, it means the brightness and contrast are too high, giving everything a live TV monitor look.

 

The TVs in the store always look too orange and too blue to me.  One thing I have always done with new TVs and new monitors, for myself and for others, is to turn down the "color" or "picture" setting all the way, so that it is completely in B&W. 

 

I then adjust the brightness, then the contrast, and make sure that is pleasant to look at.  Especially since I will be watching so many B&W movies.

 

Then I slowly bring up the color again, but stop shortly after I can start to see color.  I don't like it to be too prominent.  Less color is more.

 

How much so?  Take a look at this picture which is apparently bursting with color.  The frames after it break down the B&W/Luminance (Y), and the opposite ends of the Chroma spectrum (Cb, Cr) of a color picture. 

 

YUVexample.png

 

Much of the detail is in B&W, so if you crank the color up too high you actually wash out detail.  Just something to think about.

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