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Ordinant

What Actress in Flicker of a Film Intro?

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Hello All,

 

In the introduction sequence for Ben Mankiewicz, the one that begins with the words "The Flicker of a Film is Like a Heartbeat", who is the actress whose face appears first, with the word "Flicker" underneath?

 

If you recognize her, can you also provide an IMDB link to the movie from which that still was taken, or to the studio head shot if that is the source?

 

Thanks!

__________________________

 

In the spirit of saving a thousand words, here is a screen shot of the actress I'm asking about. Any ideas?

 

bES4Xpw.png

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Well, I find a lot of women actors of the period similar to each other but thought it could be Lombard. That looks like C Grant's cleft chin above. There's some leather & brasswork there. They appeared together in The Eagle and the Hawk 1933, and Lombards hair was cut that way in that picture.

 

I looked for lobbies and stills from the film and did not find that pose, but I say prove me wrong.

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Well, I find a lot of women actors of the period similar to each other but thought it could be Lombard. That looks like C Grant's cleft chin above. There's some leather & brasswork there. They appeared together in The Eagle and the Hawk 1933, and Lombards hair was cut that way in that picture.

 

I looked for lobbies and stills from the film and did not find that pose, but I say prove me wrong.

 

Looks like Virginia Huston and Robert Mitchum from Out of the Past. 

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Check the buckle on Mitchum's jacket in this shot from "Out Of The Past" with Virginia Huston.

 

Out-of-the-Past-1.jpg

 

 

It's the same in the "Flicker" photo..  

 

bES4Xpw.png

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Wow, you guys are amazing. I, too, thought at first glance that this was Carole Lombard (the greatest American comedienne of all time), but it only took a second glance to see that it was an idealized Carole at best. 

 

Thanks to all, but especially MilesArcher for providing the definitive proof in the matching still.

 

I'm going to go set my Tivo to find me all the Virginia Huston movies it can come up with.

 

Thanks again!  

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You're welcome, Ordinant.  Once James had identified the movie, it was easy to find the photo.

 

By the way, Virginia Huston played Jane in one of Lex Barker's Tarzan movies.  It was "Tarzan's Peril".

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Wow, you guys are amazing. I, too, thought at first glance that this was Carole Lombard (the greatest American comedienne of all time), but it only took a second glance to see that it was an idealized Carole at best. 

 

Thanks to all, but especially MilesArcher for providing the definitive proof in the matching still.

 

I'm going to go set my Tivo to find me all the Virginia Huston movies it can come up with.

 

Thanks again!  

 

I'm glad we could help.

 

With regards to Carole Lombard,  I used to feel she was the greatest American comedienne of film but now I place Jean Arthur just a little ahead of her.    But hey, I admit I'm splitting hairs.   Of course sadly Carole's career was cut short so we can only speculate what she would have done in the 40s with the change in American comedies that took place than.

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Looks like Virginia Huston and Robert Mitchum from Out of the Past. 

 

Ya got it!

 

Thanks to you & others for correct answer & proof.

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I'm glad we could help.

 

With regards to Carole Lombard,  I used to feel she was the greatest American comedienne of film but now I place Jean Arthur just a little ahead of her.    But hey, I admit I'm splitting hairs.   Of course sadly Carole's career was cut short so we can only speculate what she would have done in the 40s with the change in American comedies that took place than.

 

I can argue with no man who wants to crown Jean Arthur before Carole Lombard. I love her, too. 

 

As evidence for my position, I offer only two points:

  • Carole jumping up and down on her bed in delight yelling "Godfrey loves me! Godfrey loves me!"
  • The entirety of To Be or Not To Be.

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I can argue with no man who wants to crown Jean Arthur before Carole Lombard. I love her, too. 

 

As evidence for my position, I offer only two points:

  • Carole jumping up and down on her bed in delight yelling "Godfrey loves me! Godfrey loves me!"
  • The entirety of To Be or Not To Be.

 

 

Well that is some solid evidence.    I would offer up Jean Arthur in Talk of the Town saying 'excuse me' after hitting Colman over the head and the entirety of The Devil and Miss Jones.

 

As for To Be or Not To Be;  this film shows that Lombard still had that magical comic tough after making a few dramas.  The sparkle was still clearly there.

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Well that is some solid evidence.    I would offer up Jean Arthur in Talk of the Town saying 'excuse me' after hitting Colman over the head and the entirety of The Devil and Miss Jones.

 

As for To Be or Not To Be;  this film shows that Lombard still had that magical comic tough after making a few dramas.  The sparkle was still clearly there.

 

Well-rejoindered. You made me go watch Talk of the Town, of which I had a fortunately saved copy. One slight correction: she says "Excuse me", adorably, just after throwing a bowl full of water onto the face of the prone, passed-out Cary Grant. 

 

In further defense of Carole Lombard, you force me to bring out the heavy cannon held in reserve:

  • Every scene with Carole and John Barrymore in Twentieth Century.

Anticipating your response, you might mention The More the Merrier.

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Well-rejoindered. You made me go watch Talk of the Town, of which I had a fortunately saved copy. One slight correction: she says "Excuse me", adorably, just after throwing a bowl full of water onto the face of the prone, passed-out Cary Grant. 

 

In further defense of Carole Lombard, you force me to bring out the heavy cannon held in reserve:

  • Every scene with Carole and John Barrymore in Twentieth Century.

Anticipating your response, you might mention The More the Merrier.

 

Thanks for the correction.  I felt I might have been off on that one but just the way she say excuse me just gets me every time.

 

As for cannon fire for Lombard;  you haven't even mentioned the films she made with Fred MacMurray.  Hands Across the Table being the best of the 4 but all having their moments.     Hey,  I'm sinking my own ship here! 

 

Like I said these two were just fantastic and starred in many of my favorite 30s film.    Arthur in Easy Living, If You Could Only Cook,  History is Made at Night and of course the well known Capra films,  Mr. Deeds and Mr. Smith.

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Thanks for the correction.  I felt I might have been off on that one but just the way she say excuse me just gets me every time.

 

As for cannon fire for Lombard;  you haven't even mentioned the films she made with Fred MacMurray.  Hands Across the Table being the best of the 4 but all having their moments.     Hey,  I'm sinking my own ship here! 

 

Like I said these two were just fantastic and starred in many of my favorite 30s film.    Arthur in Easy Living, If You Could Only Cook,  History is Made at Night and of course the well known Capra films,  Mr. Deeds and Mr. Smith.

 

It appears we are in violent agreement about Carole Lombard and Jean Arthur. May there always be a TCM to showcase them.

 

I'm heading off to find some of those Lombard-MacMurray films.

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