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One thing leads to another!


CaveGirl
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One thing leads to another oftimes!

In the film dvd, "I Am Cuba" of Mikhail Kalatozov, I believe it was Martin Scorsese who incorrectly named the singer in the nightclub sequence to be possibly one of  The Platters. I was doing an investigation online today trying to find a recording of Duo Los Diablos who are supposedly the real performers in this stunningly mesmerizing vocal cover version in the movie.

 

New information has surfaced since I first bought the dvd, stating that they actually called themselves Los Diablos Melodicos, and the lead singer was named Ignacio Castro with cousin, Felix Castro as backup and that this is their only recorded on film performance, of the song "Loco Amor". This edification lead me to looking up the original English version, which is "Crazy Love" written and performed by Paul Anka.
 

Hard to believe that this very Cuban sounding version, came from a very American pop origin, which then lead me to looking up versions online, in which other songs interpreted as "Mad Love" came up, which then lead me to thinking about the Karl Freund film with Peter Lorre and that cockatoo or bird sequence, which reminded me also of the similar scene in "Citizen Kane" with the bald-headed Charles Foster looking a lot like the mad doctor in the netherworldly pastiche of "The Hands of Orlac". 
Being that both scenes are so dreamlike, and things in infra-red film like "I Am Cuba" are also, I wondered if any other films were ever shot in infra-red film, but only came up with something called "The Enclave" by Richard Mosse and that got me thinking about films with the best dreamlike sequences and for my money, it would possibly be the dream section of "Los Olvidados" by Bunuel, which is amazing and quite frightening also. 

 

Which leads me to ask and get to my real point...what do you think is the most effective dream sequence in a film, or your personal favorite?

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Looks like your perambulations would make one of the better ones.

 

The best dream sequences in film would have to be the ones in Bunuel's Belle de Jour.  Not only do they capture the spontaneity and idiosyncrasy of dreams, but they are seamlessly integrated with the rest of the movie, and are the force which drives the movie forward.

 

Next up would be sequences from Fellini's movies, like 8 1/2, and Juliet of the Spirits.  But they are not so much dreams as expositions of the psyche of the characters.  

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Slayton, you slay me!

 

"Belle du Jour" has that bell ringing all the time, making one try to figure out what is real and what is the dream.

And "Juliet of the Spirits" definitely has a dreamy take to it, being with all that color after the more common b&w Fellini films.
 

I own "81/2" but haven't watched in eons, so must rewatch. Thanks for your sage comments!

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Two of the most memorable are from 1945:

 

"Spellbound"--the Hitchcock film where Salvador Dali planned out the dream sequence.

 

"Yolanda and the Thief--Vincente Minnelli's craziest, most baroque musical.  Dream sequence takes place 1/3 of the way through--but is Worth waiting for. :)

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OOOH...OOOH! I've got one. I've got one...

 

Is what little Jimmy Hunt here sees and lives through...

3003068496_60e86ef30d_z.jpg?zz=1

 

...such as his parents and others being dragged under the earth just over this little knoll...

invadersfrommarspath.jpg

 

...and having Martians insert little behavior changing capsules in the back of their necks...

invaders_02.jpg

 

...all just a bad nightmare OR did it really happen?

 

(...in the '53 sci-fi/horror classic INVADERS FROM MARS, the ending seems to suggest that all that came before WAS just a nightmare for poor little Jimmy, but then the VERY ending suggests that what he had just dreamed was indeed about to all come true)

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Alain Resnais' Providence (1977) featuring a brilliant performance by John Gielgud as a constipated writer who uses his own relatives as characters in his imagined novel.  Where does reality and imagination leave off?

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My favorite dream sequences are in Peter Ibbetson (1935), where they form the core of the movie. Peter Ibbetson has been called "A triumph of surrealist thought" by Andre Breton. A magical, multi-layered film, directed by Henry Hathaway.

 

Peter_Ibbetson-45.jpg

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