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Dr. Rich Edwards

July 31 Film Discussion for #NoirSummer for all 13 Films

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Desperate

 

I had to see Desperate after that great clip in the Daily Dose, and I wasn’t disappointed. It’s a great film noir—and it doesn’t have a femme fatale! The opening credits were a bit of a surprise with the almost cartoonish shadows cast on a sidewalk and the wall. But the opening music is anything but cartoonish.

 

Steve Brodie is a great actor. The sounds he makes during the beating he receives at Walt’s are just as terrifying a second time (the first time for me being the clip from the Daily Dose). In a way, the beating is even more frightening because the beginning of the movie shows Steve at home, happy with his wife. Walt’s threat to hurt Anne is also more terrifying because the viewer is now invested in Steve’s and Anne’s story. The makeup is effective, too: Steve really looks bloody and swollen.

 

When Walt Radak finally catches up to Steve, he and his accomplice hide out in Steve’s apartment, surprise him, and hold him hostage. He wants to kill Steve at midnight, the same time that his brother Al will be executed. While Walt and his accomplice wait to kill Steve, the tension mounts: with the ticking clock, then the echoing sound it takes; with the close-ups, then the choker close-ups. And then the tension breaks with the knock at the door from a neighbor.

 

Walt doesn’t want any more interruptions from any more neighbors, so he and his accomplice take Steve outside, but the police are waiting. Detective Lieutenant Ferrari is injured slightly in the ensuing mélée, and Walt retreats into the apartment building. Steve takes Ferrari’s gun and follows Walt. The shot of the staircase, the dark lighting, the shadows where Steve and Walt hide to avoid being shot: All are great details.

 

The shots of different neighbors peeking into the hallway to see what’s going on add some comic relief. After Walt’s body falls all the flights down between the banisters, all of the neighbors in the apartment building come out into the hallway (don’t shoot anyone in an apartment building if you don’t want any witnesses!). I especially liked the police officer who tells them that they should go back into their apartments because there’s nothing to see—except Walt’s dead body on the first floor, that is!

 

Desperate is a very satisfying movie. It’s filled with tension, and it has one of the most evil crime bosses in all of film noir (Raymond Burr as Walt Radak), but justice and even a little bit of humor still prevail.

 

It's been a joy reading your posts all summer long. Reading this one is an excellent example as to why. You bring forth an imagery of the film with detailed descriptions of those last moments. On other posts, you wrote of your interpretations of certain scenes and/or you shared certain facts which came from either personal knowledge or outside sources which were very helpful in better understanding the films you were writing on.

 

I don't think I'm alone considering the many who exchange thoughts and ideas with you. We learn lots through those exchanges.  

 

Thank you. Thank you all.

Friends in noir

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It's been a joy reading your posts all summer long. Reading this one is an excellent example as to why. You bring forth an imagery of the film with detailed descriptions of those last moments. On other posts, you wrote of your interpretations of certain scenes and/or you shared certain facts which came from either personal knowledge or outside sources which were very helpful in better understanding the films you were writing on.

 

I don't think I'm alone considering the many who exchange thoughts and ideas with you. We learn lots through those exchanges.  

 

Thank you. Thank you all.

Friends in noir

 

A heartfelt thanks!

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OKAY, SO WHO ELSE IS MISSING THE SUMMER OF DARKNESS COURSE? 

 

I feel lost.  I was really into watching the Daily Doses and then discussing them here. 

 

I wish there was something on-going to constantly be part of.

 

It was a great course and I learned quite a lot.

 

By the way, "The Damned Don't Cry"...excellent noir in my opinion!

 

I'm missing the class and the Daily Doses of Darkness and the posts . . . . You are not alone on that point.

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I'm missing the class and the Daily Doses of Darkness and the posts . . . . You are not alone on that point.

 

I'm with you.   I'd be a crying but the dammed don't cry.    ;)

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Party Girl

 

Although the course is over, I'm still working my way through all the films I have on DVR and Party Girl is my 81st movie of the Summer of Darkness schedule and I have to say...

 

I have obviously learned absolutely nothing, as I cannot see one single thing about this movie that tells me it should be considered a Noir!!

 

I mean, it was an okay film but it was more a creaky old gangster movie than anything else with a couple of slots put in for Cyd Cahrise's "dancing", which brings me on to another point: there was nothing at all 1930s about that music or dancing, or costumes and it made me wonder why they even bothered. Why not just make it set in the 50s? After all, the only thing that really said this was the 30s were Powell's pencil 'tache, some old cars and a few iffy gangster suits!! As to "Noir", who knows? 

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Party Girl

 

Although the course is over, I'm still working my way through all the films I have on DVR and Party Girl is my 81st movie of the Summer of Darkness schedule and I have to say...

 

I have obviously learned absolutely nothing, as I cannot see one single thing about this movie that tells me it should be considered a Noir!!

 

I mean, it was an okay film but it was more a creaky old gangster movie than anything else with a couple of slots put in for Cyd Cahrise's "dancing", which brings me on to another point: there was nothing at all 1930s about that music or dancing, or costumes and it made me wonder why they even bothered. Why not just make it set in the 50s? After all, the only thing that really said this was the 30s were Powell's pencil 'tache, some old cars and a few iffy gangster suits!! As to "Noir", who knows? 

 

Well the book Film Noir (Silver \ Ward), offer many reasons why they view this film as a noir.   A lot of this has to do with comparing the director Nicholas Ray's other noirs with this very late entry in the noir cycle.    The central noir theme relates to noir sexuality; "it can either destroy them or allow them to transcend the bounties of society"';  in this case freeing themselves from the mob.  

 

Also there is the role of the DA, played by Kent Smith;  He is just as ambitious as Rico and even uses dirty methods to expose the mob with the goal of being governor.    The noir theme here being the cynicism related to the underworld as compared to the 'upperworld'.  

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Party Girl

 

Although the course is over, I'm still working my way through all the films I have on DVR and Party Girl is my 81st movie of the Summer of Darkness schedule and I have to say...

 

I have obviously learned absolutely nothing, as I cannot see one single thing about this movie that tells me it should be considered a Noir!!

 

I mean, it was an okay film but it was more a creaky old gangster movie than anything else with a couple of slots put in for Cyd Cahrise's "dancing", which brings me on to another point: there was nothing at all 1930s about that music or dancing, or costumes and it made me wonder why they even bothered. Why not just make it set in the 50s? After all, the only thing that really said this was the 30s were Powell's pencil 'tache, some old cars and a few iffy gangster suits!! As to "Noir", who knows? 

 

Party girl was definitely a terrible movie, but with respect to the dancing, you may be unaware of its history. Dancing was very much a part of American culture and even more so during the 1920s and 30s.  The 20s saw the move away from the more refined foxtrot to the craziness of the charleston. The 30s saw the rise of the big band jazz orchestras, chorus girls, and swing dancing. The radio played live music (not the pre-recorded music we hear on radios today). So while these bands were performing, large crowds came out to swing dance the following styles: lindy hop, balboa, collegiate shag, etc. Supper clubs had bands and dancers. It was very much a part of the 30s.

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Well the book Film Noir (Silver \ Ward), offer many reasons why they view this film as a noir.   A lot of this has to do with comparing the director Nicholas Ray's other noirs with this very late entry in the noir cycle.    The central noir theme relates to noir sexuality; "it can either destroy them or allow them to transcend the bounties of society"';  in this case freeing themselves from the mob.  

 

Also there is the role of the DA, played by Kent Smith;  He is just as ambitious as Rico and even uses dirty methods to expose the mob with the goal of being governor.    The noir theme here being the cynicism related to the underworld as compared to the 'upperworld'.  

Then I have to align myself firmly along with the narrower definition of the term "Noir" camp. I just don't see the themes here being really any different to earlier gangster movies such as Scarface. To me it was simply a film 20 years past it's time and harkened much more back to those older films than anything else we really saw in the line-up. 

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Party girl was definitely a terrible movie, but with respect to the dancing, you may be unaware of its history. Dancing was very much a part of American culture and even more so during the 1920s and 30s.  The 20s saw the move away from the more refined foxtrot to the craziness of the charleston. The 30s saw the rise of the big band jazz orchestras, chorus girls, and swing dancing. The radio played live music (not the pre-recorded music we hear on radios today). So while these bands were performing, large crowds came out to swing dance the following styles: lindy hop, balboa, collegiate shag, etc. Supper clubs had bands and dancers. It was very much a part of the 30s.

No, I do understand the importance of music and dance in those days, I just don't think that - in this particular film - that the scenes portrayed reflected it's supposed 1930s setting...to me it felt more akin to some of those 1960's westerns where the female characters have obviously 60's hairdos and make-up! 

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I'm missing the class and the Daily Doses of Darkness and the posts . . . . You are not alone on that point.

I am missing the film noirs too. Since they ended I have looked on You Tube and watched two little known noirs. A LIFE AT STAKE 1954 with Angela Lansbury and Keith Andes. Angela was bad again, and there is something about Keith Andes that is nice looking. His eyes are interesting rather far apart. TRY AND GET IT 1950 starred Frank Lovejoy and Lloyd Bridges. The movie was depressing because Frank started out with good intentions until he met Lloyd. The ending was rather traumatic. I feel that I didn`t waste my time watching these noirs, and I will keep on the lookout for anymore that I can watch.Tonight I will watch FLAMINGO ROAD and THE DAMNED DON`T CRY.

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I'm missing the class and the Daily Doses of Darkness and the posts . . . . You are not alone on that point.

 

This is a topic that keeps popping up on the message boards, and I want you to know that I am still following these discussions, even though the course has concluded. 

 

I have definitely passed along the messages to TCM that there remains a lot of interest on the Daily Doses. It's great to hear how much the community here valued the Daily Doses. The best part for me was reading all those marvelous posts each day that the community produced around each new Daily Dose.

 

I don't know yet what is going to happen next around a TCM course like #NoirSummer in the future, as I am still wrapping up this course and working hard to get all those Certificates out on 8/17/15.

 

But please keep posting your feedback and/or what you liked about the course because all those posts can be shared with TCM and helps show the interest that is out there for more courses like #NoirSummer. 

 

Thanks everyone!

 

Yours in noir, 

Prof. Rich Edwards

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The Wrong Man: Documentary Realism and Formalism

 

The opening by Alfred Hitchcock, where he tells the viewers that the story they are about to see is true, sets up the realistic tone of The Wrong Man. Documentary realism is a big part of this film, of course. Manny’s treatment by the police during the store visits, the realistic shots of New York City at night, the accusers acting in charge when Manny visits their stores with the detectives: all of it seemed to be told in real time.

 

The film starts to use some formalistic techniques to give viewers a sense of Manny’s confusion. For example, a few short scenes showing Rose trying to find Manny are intercut with the scenes of him going into the stores, being fingerprinted and booked, having everything in his pockets catalogued. She’s worried because he’s late. The cutting back and forth between Manny’s story and Rose’s worry adds to the tension, even though the scenes with Rose are short compared to Manny’s. The music throughout the film emphasizes the despair and discord caused by the false accusation made against Manny.

 

Rose starts to lose hope and can’t help Manny through the trial. His mother reminds him to pray, and he does. Manny’s face is shown in close-up, and the guilty man walks into the frame from a point in the distance (he starts walking in a long shot). He moves into Manny’s close-up and their faces overlap. The sequence not only shows how Manny is cleared, it also shows how easy it is to mistake one man for the other. I thought this point in the film was one of the clearest indictments of the legal system.

 

The text explaining what happens to Rose and the shot of a family walking down a street, presumably in Florida, seemed like they were tacked on in an effort to wrap up the story. It seemed only to add the sense of oppression I felt throughout the film. The sense of oppression and existential dread made me think of The Stranger, by Albert Camus.

 

One more thought: I read online that one of the real-life prisoners calls out to Henry Fonda when he’s being led to his prison cell because his character Manny can’t make bail: “What did they get you for, Henry?” I could hear it faintly on the DVD that I watched. Now that’s realism!

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Brute Force

 

Well, I've been bemoaning the selection of many of the so-called Noirs on the Summer of Darkness schedule but with this film, I got one with a vengeance!

 

A brutal and nasty little film with nary a sympathetic character to be found, tough and uncompromising with no-one coming out of it well. It was interesting to see the almost complete lack of differentiation here between the "good" prison staff and the "bad" inmates. The weaselly warden, doing anything to keep his job, the brutal fascist guard captain and his compliant staff: all of them to a large degree shown as only nominally free, almost as much prisoners of the system as the inmates, as if the brutal were deliberately set to rule the brutal. 

 

Although we were supposed to be sympathetic to the prisoners as people who had complex lives outside of their lives inside (witness the use of the flashbacks linked by their love for women symbolized by the girl's picture on the wall), Joe Collins, played by Burt Lancaster, was a strange exception in a way. We see him in a flashback being tender and declaring his love to a girl in a wheelchair but apart from that moment he remains a bit of a mystery: we don't find out what he's inside for, or why everyone seems to hold him to a very high degree of regard - on both sides of the fence - but it's noticeable that, in his own way, he's every bit as brutal as Captain Munsey, after all, the two informers who cross him both meet very sticky ends, even if on neither instance does he actually carry out the killing. 

 

I'm sure that the audience of the day would have been shocked by what they saw on the screen, and it may have been a game-changer for a lot of people in terms of how they start to regard figures of authority, but I also wonder if anyone would have come out of the theater having really enjoyed the movie too? I'm not sure I did. 

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One more thought: I read online that one of the real-life prisoners calls out to Henry Ford when he’s being led to his prison cell because his character Manny can’t make bail: “What did they get you for, Henry?” I could hear it faintly on the DVD that I watched. Now that’s realism!

 

 

You mean Henry Fonda. Yes, I heard it too...very clearly. I had to rewind it just to see the reaction out of everyone else. True realism at its best.

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Then I have to align myself firmly along with the narrower definition of the term "Noir" camp. I just don't see the themes here being really any different to earlier gangster movies such as Scarface. To me it was simply a film 20 years past it's time and harkened much more back to those older films than anything else we really saw in the line-up. 

 

Based on our various conversations I do tend to have a broader definition as it relates to placing a film into the noir camp (style) especially as it relates to character development (on the visual side I tend towards the narrow).     I view Party Girl as borderline but clearly the authors of the book Film Noir didn't.   They spent more pages on this movie than other films that are viewed as classic noir type films.    Maybe the author had a thing for Cyd Charisse!     

 

Did you see The Dammed Don't Cry?    Now that is a what noir is all about.   A dark and cynical type film.   While I'm not a big overall fan of the actors that worked with Joan Crawford in this film,  they really played their type to the 'T' in this film.   That is casting to type at its best.    Joan really pulls off 'movie star' in this film;  i.e. she rose way above her looks, acting ability and age in this movie.

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Based on our various conversations I do tend to have a broader definition as it relates to placing a film into the noir camp (style) especially as it relates to character development (on the visual side I tend towards the narrow).     I view Party Girl as borderline but clearly the authors of the book Film Noir didn't.   They spent more pages on this movie than other films that are viewed as classic noir type films.    Maybe the author had a thing for Cyd Charisse!     

 

Did you see The Dammed Don't Cry?    Now that is a what noir is all about.   A dark and cynical type film.   While I'm not a big overall fan of the actors that worked with Joan Crawford in this film,  they really played their type to the 'T' in this film.   That is casting to type at its best.    Joan really pulls off 'movie star' in this film;  i.e. she rose way above her looks, acting ability and age in this movie.

Really? I'm going to have to get that book as I really need to know how they class Party Girl as Noir! (Perhaps too, it might shed some light on the awful "A Woman's Secret", which I had the misfortune of watching today.) All I can say is that they can't be too sure themselves if they feel the need to spend so much time on it! 

 

I missed The Damned Don't Cry, sadly. Was it on TCM? Shame, I feel I've seen too many happy endings recently, I need some Noir despair! 

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You mean Henry Fonda. Yes, I heard it too...very clearly. I had to rewind it just to see the reaction out of everyone else. True realism at its best.

 

I did mean Henry Fonda!!! Thanks. I had to go back and fix it: to give Fonda his due!

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The Wrong Man

 

What a strange film...I've never seen this movie before and it somehow just doesn't seem like a Hitchcock. It was more like a prototype episode of Law and Order than something from the director of so many wonderful movies.

 

To me, it seemed curiously one-speed throughout, almost as if the gear was stuck on "sad": Henry Fonda seemed sad, his career was sad, his wife was sad, the crime was slight - and sad - and even the ending was sad (despite the card telling us that two years later all was peachy!). 

 

As a documentary style recreation of actual events, it was interesting to watch the legal process progress unsatisfactorily through it's paces and we can all be thankful that things have changed since the 1950s to protect our rights, but I cannot say I actually enjoyed the movie much. I suppose the message of the movie was that we are all just one short step away from being dumped on by fickle fate, but the fact that it was only a happy accident that Fonda got cleared in the end after the mistrial certainly didn't serve to give anyone much confidence in the Justice System! 

 

I agree that The Wrong Man is incredibly sad. In fact, I used the word oppressive in my post. But it's so well crafted, and if Hitchcock meant to show how sad and oppressive it feels to be falsely accused, I would have to say that he achieved his purpose. And I am still thinking about the film, and that says a lot. I don't think I could say that I enjoyed The Wrong Man, not while I was watching it. I could appreciate the technique and the plot. It's much easier to say that I liked it in retrospect, after some time had passed. It really was quite powerful, and I have a new-found respect for Henry Fonda. When his young son comes in to chat with his father, my heart ached for the two of them.

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I agree that The Wrong Man is incredibly sad. In fact, I used the word oppressive in my post. But it's so well crafted, and if Hitchcock meant to show how sad and oppressive it feels to be falsely accused, I would have to say that he achieved his purpose. And I am still thinking about the film, and that says a lot. I don't think I could say that I enjoyed The Wrong Man, not while I was watching it. I could appreciate the technique and the plot. It's much easier to say that I liked it in retrospect, after some time had passed. It really was quite powerful, and I have a new-found respect for Henry Fonda. When his young son comes in to chat with his father, my heart ached for the two of them.

 

I also shed a few tears when I saw the father/son interaction. The Wrong Man reminds me so much of this Italian post-war, neo-realist film Ladri di Biciclette. Though the plots differ, it still has the same sad mood throughout the film. The focus is on the working class community. There is also the subject of injustice, desperation, and the bond between father and son. Each father is in search of something; Manny searching for evidence of his innocence and Antonio looking for his stolen bicycle which he needed to earn his living. 

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I also shed a few tears when I saw the father/son interaction. The Wrong Man reminds me so much of this Italian post-war, neo-realist film Ladri di Biciclette. Though the plots differ, it still has the same sad mood throughout the film. The focus is on the working class community. There is also the subject of injustice, desperation, and the bond between father and son. Each father is in search of something; Manny searching for evidence of his innocence and Antonio looking for his stolen bicycle which he needed to earn his living. 

 

I should have given a shout-out to the child actor, too. The scene starts with him outside the bedroom door, and he carries his share of the scene admirably. Still thinking about The Wrong Man. I'm afraid I'll have to give it a day or two before I am ready to see Brute Force.

 

Is Ladri di Biciclette translated as The Bicylcle Thief in English? I really can't remember if I have seen it, so I should add it to my general (not film noir) movies-I-have-to-see list!

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Is Ladri di Biciclette translated as The Bicylcle Thief in English? I really can't remember if I have seen it, so I should add it to my general (not film noir) movies-I-have-to-see list!

 

It's actually plural form (I understand and speak some Italian) Bicycle Thieves. I'm not sure what the English title is. It could be the singular form.

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It's actually plural form (I understand and speak some Italian) Bicycle Thieves. I'm not sure what the English title is. It could be the singular form.

 

Wikipedia says they are one and the same. It's on my list.

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It is singular, 'The Bicycle Thief'. It's a good film but a rather dreary portrayal of life of that time and place. The NY Times has original reviews of many films from the date published - here's the one from 1949. If you haven't seen it, you might want to wait to read the review as it does explain parts of the plot.

 

SPOILER ALERT

http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9F0CE1DE133CE53ABC4B52DFB4678382659EDE

 

 

Each Daily Dose of Darkness was so much fun. Long term I think I might prefer it weekly (although that wouldn't work with the D's!).

 

I'd already seen many of the movies shown during the Summer of Darkness but enjoyed seeing them again with a different perspective, noticing aspects of the films I wouldn't have known about before. I'd enjoy a class like this again.

 

Raymond Burr is one of my favorites, he's so good at being a total slimeball, and can be downright intense in his portrayal of characters in some of the films too.

 

 

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It is singular, 'The Bicycle Thief'. It's a good film but a rather dreary portrayal of life of that time and place. The NY Times has original reviews of many films from the date published - here's the one from 1949. If you haven't seen it, you might want to wait to read the review as it does explain parts of the plot.

 

SPOILER ALERT

http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9F0CE1DE133CE53ABC4B52DFB4678382659EDE

 

 

Each Daily Dose of Darkness was so much fun. Long term I think I might prefer it weekly (although that wouldn't work with the D's!).

 

I'd already seen many of the movies shown during the Summer of Darkness but enjoyed seeing them again with a different perspective, noticing aspects of the films I wouldn't have known about before. I'd enjoy a class like this again.

 

Raymond Burr is one of my favorites, he's so good at being a total slimeball, and can be downright intense in his portrayal of characters in some of the films too.

Thanks for recognizing Raymond Burr`s evil and brutal characters in many film noirs. He still remains my favorite, and I am grateful that he was given the opportunity to showcase his ability to play a good character in PERRY MASON the tv series for nine seasons.

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It is singular, 'The Bicycle Thief'. It's a good film but a rather dreary portrayal of life of that time and place. The NY Times has original reviews of many films from the date published - here's the one from 1949. If you haven't seen it, you might want to wait to read the review as it does explain parts of the plot.

 

SPOILER ALERT

http://www.nytimes.com/movie/review?res=9F0CE1DE133CE53ABC4B52DFB4678382659EDE

 

 

Each Daily Dose of Darkness was so much fun. Long term I think I might prefer it weekly (although that wouldn't work with the D's!).

 

I'd already seen many of the movies shown during the Summer of Darkness but enjoyed seeing them again with a different perspective, noticing aspects of the films I wouldn't have known about before. I'd enjoy a class like this again.

 

Raymond Burr is one of my favorites, he's so good at being a total slimeball, and can be downright intense in his portrayal of characters in some of the films too.

 

De Sica's The Bicycle Thief is a wonderfully poignant film shot in Italian Postwar Neorealism.   I mean, following the global calamity of WWII and it's towering events De Sica distills the world, life and happiness.down to a father, his son, and a bike!  

 

The Neorealists of Italian Postwar cinema --- De Sica, Rossellini, Visconti, Fellini, etc. ---  were masters of this artful reduction; from the ruins of WWII, using the rubble of war-torn cities as their canvas, they turned film and the stories they told inside-out; big, often shattered locations became the tone-setting backdrops to 'little', i.e. highly personalized stories of both hope and despair.  

 

The style was quickly embraced by films noir in the U.S., as director's here perhaps saw chilling similarities between the bombed-and-burned-out ruins of Europe's cities and the squalor, decay and blight of our own urban landscapes as perfect playgrounds for the alienation, uneasiness, greed and corruption so prevalent in Postwar noir.       

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