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SUTS picks, day by day.


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Hey, it's starting!  I know, I hear a collective yawn.  But surely, there's got to be something worth looking forward to each day.  Saturday, August 1, I've read people excited by The Egyptian.  I watched some of it, but. . . .

 

I'm going to focus on what I'm looking forward to, not be negative about what I don't care for (there's plenty of opportunity for that elsewhere)

 

. . . . Along with Miss Tierney's usuals, we have Whirlpool, which interests me due to what I've read by others.

 

And there's always The Ghost and Mrs. Muir.

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I will not be part of the collective yawn.  I'll be the lone person in the corner clapping because I always look forward to SUTS.  There are so many movies that I want to see and haven't, that I never run out of stuff that I want to watch and/or DVR.

 

My picks for Gene Tierney day:

 

Laura

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

Heaven Can Wait

 

I'm personally recording:

Whirlpool

The Razor's Edge

Advise & Consent

Never Let Me Go

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I will not be part of the collective yawn.  I'll be the lone person in the corner clapping because I always look forward to SUTS.  There are so many movies that I want to see and haven't, that I never run out of stuff that I want to watch and/or DVR.

 

My picks for Gene Tierney day:

 

Laura

The Ghost and Mrs. Muir

Heaven Can Wait

 

I'm personally recording:

Whirlpool

The Razor's Edge

Advise & Consent

Never Let Me Go

Haven't seen Advise & Consent for ages. Very engaging political soap, with fascinating actors/characters, and a rare gay blackmail subtext for Hollywood at that time. Charles Laughton is totally over the top -- and very enjoyable to watch. 

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Haven't seen Advise & Consent for ages. Very engaging political soap, with fascinating actors/characters, and a rare gay blackmail subtext for Hollywood at that time. Charles Laughton is totally over the top -- and very enjoyable to watch. 

I thought the synopsis sounded interesting.  I'm glad that you enjoyed it.  Hopefully I will too.

 

Unlike Summer of Darkness, I'm not going to record everything in SUTS.  I'm trying to be more selective.  Lol.  I have a feeling that I'm going to overload the DVR unless I get watchin'.  Lol.  My husband and I have 381 recordings, 219 of which are mine and we're already 59% on the DVR.  Yikes.  I'll be all up in film noir probably until 2016.  Lol.

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SUTS would be hugely improved if TCM instituted a policy of no repeats for at least 5 or 6 years.  The only exception would be where they had enough films from a particular major star to be able to present an entirely different 24 hour selection than the previous one. 

 

Just to take the most blatant example of why such a policy would be beneficial, look at the selection for Katharine Hepburn on August 7.  If there's a single movie there that hasn't been shown multiple times a year ever since I can remember, I'd like to know what it is.  Nothing against Hepburn per se, but when are we going to get George Sanders or Raymond Burr?

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Unlike Summer of Darkness, I'm not going to record everything in SUTS.  I'm trying to be more selective.  Lol.  I have a feeling that I'm going to overload the DVR unless I get watchin'.  Lol.  My husband and I have 381 recordings, 219 of which are mine and we're already 59% on the DVR.  Yikes.  I'll be all up in film noir probably until 2016.  Lol.

You inspired me to count -- I have 78 films on my DVR/cable box, representing 91% of capacity. Some of them I want to keep; others are just there until I watch them. Several are in HD, which takes up a lot more space. I didn't pay attention a while back and went over the maximum. A few films were arbitrarily deleted (e.g. The Dead, one of my favorite films), so I am more careful now.

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SUTS would be hugely improved if TCM instituted a policy of no repeats for at least 5 or 6 years.  The only exception would be where they had enough films from a particular major star to be able to present an entirely different 24 hour selection than the previous one. 

 

Just to take the most blatant example of why such a policy would be beneficial, look at the selection for Katharine Hepburn on August 7.  If there's a single movie there that hasn't been shown multiple times a year ever since I can remember, I'd like to know what it is.  Nothing against Hepburn per se, but when are we going to get George Sanders or Raymond Burr?

I don't like SUTS at all because it focues on one "celebrity" ALL DAY AND NIGHT.  I probably watch less TCM during August than any other month - a lot less.

But, your plan would be an improvement.  Maybe next year do nothing but "B" actors?

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My feeling about "repeats" for SUTS is this: we are hard core film fans and watch TCM regularly. These films are familiar to us and somewhat a bore.

 

For someone only marginally interested in classic film, tuning in & seeing Katherine Hepburn might be a joy. They may catch a good movie previously unknown to them that may spark a larger interest in classic film.

 

The biggest thing to remember is it's not all about YOU, there are millions of others watching TV.

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My feeling about "repeats" for SUTS is this: we are hard core film fans and watch TCM regularly. These films are familiar to us and somewhat a bore.

 

For someone only marginally interested in classic film, tuning in & seeing Katherine Hepburn might be a joy. They may catch a good movie previously unknown to them that may spark a larger interest in classic film.

 

The biggest thing to remember is it's not all about YOU, there are millions of others watching TV.

 

I'm not unaware of that consideration, but it's not as if those same Hepburn movies aren't repeatedly shown during the other 11 months, often in prime time and frequently in "The Essentials".  Why would you suppose that a marginally interested viewer would only be interested in seeing films that are also available throughout the year. and which they may well have already seen?

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Tomorrow is Olivia de Havilland day...

 

These are my picks:

 

Princess O'Rourke

The Adventures of Robin Hood

Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte

 

I would pick The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex, but only because it has two of my faves: Errol (of course) and Bette Davis.  I am not sure why this film was selected as a showcase for de Havilland.  It is really Errol and Bette's film.  While de Havilland's character does have a pivotal part in the plot, her part could have been played by a lesser star.  Her best scene, imo, is when she tries to convince Errol that Bette doesn't really love him.  de Havilland ends up telling Errol that she loves him and that he should be with her. 

 

If they wanted to pick another Flynn/de Havilland pairing, I would have selected Dodge City, Captain Blood, or They Died With Their Boots On instead. 

 

I'm personally recording:

 

It's Love I'm After

The Male Animal

In This Our Life

Light in the Piazza

 

Looking in the TCM guide, it looks like Dodge City was originally scheduled to air between 'Elizabeth and Essex' and The Adventures of Robin Hood.  It looks like it's been replaced by In This Our Life.  As much as I love Dodge City, I've seen it a million times and own it, so I'm happy to see that there are now two (well three if you include 'Elizabeth and Essex') de Havilland/Bette Davis collaborations scheduled. 

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Tomorrow is Olivia de Havilland day...

 

These are my picks:

 

Princess O'Rourke

The Adventures of Robin Hood

Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte

 

I would pick The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex, but only because it has two of my faves: Errol (of course) and Bette Davis.  I am not sure why this film was selected as a showcase for de Havilland.  It is really Errol and Bette's film.  While de Havilland's character does have a pivotal part in the plot, her part could have been played by a lesser star.  Her best scene, imo, is when she tries to convince Errol that Bette doesn't really love him.  de Havilland ends up telling Errol that she loves him and that he should be with her. 

 

If they wanted to pick another Flynn/de Havilland pairing, I would have selected Dodge City, Captain Blood, or They Died With Their Boots On instead. 

 

I'm personally recording:

 

It's Love I'm After

The Male Animal

In This Our Life

Light in the Piazza

 

Looking in the TCM guide, it looks like Dodge City was originally scheduled to air between 'Elizabeth and Essex' and The Adventures of Robin Hood.  It looks like it's been replaced by In This Our Life.  As much as I love Dodge City, I've seen it a million times and own it, so I'm happy to see that there are now two (well three if you include 'Elizabeth and Essex') de Havilland/Bette Davis collaborations scheduled. 

 

I highly recommend The Great Garrick.   It is a fine movie; romantic,  funny (with some scenes bordering on screwball), and well acted.   It is directed by James Whale,  known for Universal horror films,  and his stamp is on the film.

 

An unknown gem IMO.   Olivia doesn't have a big part but she never looked more beautiful on film (of course that doesn't interest you, ha ha),  but Brian Aherne is good.    He meet his future wife,  Olivia sister Joan while making this film.

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I highly recommend The Great Garrick.   It is a fine movie; romantic,  funny (with some scenes bordering on screwball), and well acted.   It is directed by James Whale,  known for Universal horror films,  and his stamp is on the film.

 

An unknown gem IMO.   Olivia doesn't have a big part but she never looked more beautiful on film (of course that doesn't interest you, ha ha),  but Brian Aherne is good.    He meet his future wife,  Olivia sister Joan while making this film.

Thanks for the recommendation James! I'll set this one up too.  I read the synopsis and wasn't sure if it'd be something I'd like, but I guess I don't have anything to lose.  Worst thing that could happen is that I delete it off the DVR.

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Swithin--don't record "Advise and Consent" (1962) strictly for Gene Tierney--her role as a Washington D.C. hostess is about 10 minutes long in a two hour and twenty some minute film.  AAC was made as a the first of a three film settlement of her contract with Twentieth Century Fox after her multiple mental breakdowns in the mid 1950's.  Her appearance in "Toys in the Attic (1963) was also part of that settlement.   I won't comment on it because I haven't seen it.  Her final film was "The Pleasure Seekers (1964).  Her 1978 autobiography "Self-Portrait" offers much insight into this troubled womans' life.  JMO.

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speedracer5, you beat me to Miss de Havilland, but here's the post I planned, anyway:

 

Here's a fine thing.  We're only half-done with Miss Tierney, and already I'm on to Olivia de Havilland.  Keeping with the things I'm looking forward to, there are two movies that are new to me:  It's Love I'm After, and Government Girl, so I'll be looking out for them. 

 

There's a large number of movies we've seen a lot, but personally, I don't mind seeing them again:

 

The Great Garrick, as jamesjazzguitar said is a lot of fun, as I remember.

 

In This Our Life has a very wicked Bette Davis, opposite a milquetoasty Miss de Havilland, if I remember correctly.  Directed by John Huston.

 

The Adventures of Robin Hood.  Even after all this time, it's still enjoyable to watch, and I never get tired of the Technicolor feast.  Each time I watch it, I still can't believe some of the shimmering turquoises, garnets, golds, and sapphires in the movie--all gems, and all the most vibrant of any movie.

 

Hush. . . .Hush, Sweet Charlotte.  Now who doesn't go in for some good ol' Southern decadence?

 

Light in the Piazza should be a miserable failure, despite Miss de Havilland's considerable acting.  But somehow, Yvette Mimieux pulls off a roll in which she could easily have appeared painfully ridiculous, and creates a simple, unaffected girl/woman, who elicits your affection.  She's so appealing, you don't even mind George Hamilton (dang, and I said I wasn't going to be negative!)

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Haven't seen Advise & Consent for ages. Very engaging political soap, with fascinating actors/characters, and a rare gay blackmail subtext for Hollywood at that time. Charles Laughton is totally over the top -- and very enjoyable to watch. 

I love Advise & Consent.  Fabulous performance by Charles Laughton and it's fun to watch old pros like Walter Pidgeon, Franchot Tone,  Lew Ayres and Paul Ford.  Don Murray does great job, too.  The only person who seems to be sleepwalking through the film is Henry Fonda.  And, of course, great to see the beauteous Gene Tierney at any time.

 

Lydecker

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The Great Garrick, as jamesjazzguitar said is a lot of fun, as I remember.

 

 

Hush. . . .Hush, Sweet Charlotte.  Now who doesn't go in for some good ol' Southern decadence?

 

The Great Garrick is a hoot with a great cast -- I particularly like Luis Alberni and Melville Cooper.

 

As far as Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte goes, for all it grand guignol/Southern gothic qualities, I find it a curiously moving film.

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Why would you suppose that a marginally interested viewer would only be interested in seeing films that are also available throughout the year. and which they may well have already seen?

 

I believe that the significant factor is that: "Summer Under the Stars" receives much more publicity than does the normal scheduling of movies or tributes. August is a fallow season for art and entertainment news and so reviewers and bloggers pounce on: "SUTS" as a freebie column.

 

It is by this that many 'marginally interested viewers' hear of TCM for the first time. I believe the presence of: "old standards" for each star will make such people more open to tuning to the channel than if all of the movies were obscure examples of that star's roles.

 

I feel the best programming for such new viewers would be: a movie which is familiar to all followed by a movie which is familiar to casual fans of that star followed by a movie which is a rare treat of which only the most dedicated fans have heard. Such viewers are like fish which must be lured and given a nibble before you set the hook and make them a viewer for life.

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Am looking forward to "It's Love I'm After" (1937), which, if I remember, opens memorably & doesn't lose momentum.

 

Have heard wildly differing opinions on "In This Our Life", so am looking forward to seeing it.

 

"Adventures of Robin Hood" (1938) is a **** near perfect film.

 

"Hush...Hush, Sweet Charlotte" (1965) I'm ready to see for the 9th time--Grand Guignol in the Deep South. :)

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Hey, it's starting!  I know, I hear a collective yawn.  But surely, there's got to be something worth looking forward to each day.  Saturday, August 1, I've read people excited by The Egyptian.  I watched some of it, but. . . .

 

I'm going to focus on what I'm looking forward to, not be negative about what I don't care for (there's plenty of opportunity for that elsewhere)

 

. . . . Along with Miss Tierney's usuals, we have Whirlpool, which interests me due to what I've read by others.

 

And there's always The Ghost and Mrs. Muir.

 

I caught part of WHIRLPOOL, but now wish I had recorded it. 

I did record THE EGYPTIAN based on recommendations on this board.

I'm thankful I read those recommendations rather than relying on the dismissive Maltin review.

I also recorded PLYMOUTH ADVENTURE.

I'd never heard of this movie but it intrigued me.

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Today for me it was:

It's love I'm After with Leslie Howard, Betty Davis and Olivia de Havilland (1937).

I'm not sure if I already have it so I don't want to take a chance and not record it because I want everything by Leslie that he made. I can't help but believe that Hitler had him killed because they feared him more than Spitfire planes.

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Today for me it was:

It's love I'm After with Leslie Howard, Betty Davis and Olivia de Havilland (1937).

I'm not sure if I already have it so I don't want to take a chance and not record it because I want everything by Leslie that he made. I can't help but believe that Hitler had him killed because they feared him more than Spitfire planes.

 

And what a great movie it is.  The jokes come so fast, one after the next, that I thought I was watching a Preston Sturges movie. :)

 

Joyce (Bette Davis), becomes more and more wired and angry at Basil (Leslie Howard).  Basil (in desperation, trying to calm her down) says, "Joyce, remember your glands!"  Later on in the same situation he says, "Remember your acids!"

 

And the great Eric Blore as Digges, trying to extricate Basil from a potential romantic entanglement with Marcia (Olivia DeHavilland), jumping up and down and doing all the bird calls in his repertoire to distract him... until Davis comes up behind him....  Hilarious.

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I always loved that movie, my favorite part is when Leslie gets his butler to bang on the door, Bette's putting furniture on the door to keep him out, calling him all kinds of names, and he goes through the window, sitting there looking at her

 

 

Today for me it was:

It's love I'm After with Leslie Howard, Betty Davis and Olivia de Havilland (1937).

I'm not sure if I already have it so I don't want to take a chance and not record it because I want everything by Leslie that he made. I can't help but believe that Hitler had him killed because they feared him more than Spitfire planes.

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to those who saw Whirlpool ('49)....

Why didn't Ferrer just have Tierney  destroy the recordings in the 1st place?? :wacko:

 

hqdefault.jpg

 

Because Fox would have had him permanently blacklisted for destroying private property.  That would have violated Article 666 of the Breen Code.

 

Or if you prefer more psychological motivations, why didn't Nixon destroy the tapes?

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I always loved that movie, my favorite part is when Leslie gets his butler to bang on the door, Bette's putting furniture on the door to keep him out, calling him all kinds of names, and he goes through the window, sitting there looking at him

 

It's Love I'm After is one of my favorite comedies of the 30s.   I love that scene you mention, but there are so many good ones. e.g. the bird calling scene on New Years Day.    This film isn't as well known as other 30s comedies but it is first rate.  Of course with 3 top notch actors as well as many solid character actors (e.g. Spring Byington, Bonita Gransville),  the film has a lot to offer.

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