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SUTS picks, day by day.


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Tomorrow for Vivien Leigh day...

 

Even though I dislike Marlon Brando, I recommend A Streetcar Named Desire.  I thought Brando's performance was excellent even though I hated his character (which I suppose is why I think he did such a great job).  However, this film belongs to Vivien Leigh and is one of her best.

 

I still have The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone recorded on the DVR from last time it was on.  I'm not sure if I'll like the film or not, but I always find the Tennessee Williams' plays turned films interesting.

 

I don't think I've seen a Vivien Leigh film except 'Streetcar.' I haven't even seen Gone With the Wind (I know! I know! I'm waiting for a gloriously awful rainy Oregon day to dedicate four hours to watching this film. 

 

I'm planning on recording:

 

Waterloo Bridge

Dark Journey

The Making of Gone With the Wind

21 Days

 

speedracer, please let me endorse St. Martin's Lane, and Storm in a Teacup, if you have room on your DVR.  Neither movie is a masterwork, but they have charm and appeal and are entertaining to watch.

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speedracer, please let me endorse St. Martin's Lane, and Storm in a Teacup, if you have room on your DVR.  Neither movie is a masterwork, but they have charm and appeal and are entertaining to watch.

Are those both of the films with Rex Harrison?

 

I didn't realize that: 1) Rex Harrison made so many films in the 1930s and 2) That he made quite a few with Vivien Leigh.

 

I have lots of room on my DVR.  It's 66% full and we have 411 recordings in which at least half are movies.  I'll set these two up as well.  Thanks!

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speedracer5--Cary Grant is a revelation in "Gunga Din" (1939).  He's marvelously funny as a loyal friend  but greedy fool  who whinnies in 4 different keys--one for surprise, panic, terror, & greed.  He overshadows Douglas Fairbanks Jr.  I hope you're pleasantly surprised. :)

Thanks Film Lover.  I thought this film sounded interesting, because it sounded like a different type of role for Cary Grant. 

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You might consider a triple-bill by following those two with Islands In the Stream (1977) which stars George C. Scott and David Hemmings as Eddy in what is probably his best ever screen performance.

It too is based on the Hemingway story but done quite differently again.

Thanks for the recommendation Bogie!  I'll have to find that film.  I'm going to assume that the duet between Dolly Parton and Kenny Rogers also called "Islands in the Stream" is sadly not the title track to this film?

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For all his stature as an actor, John Wayne doesn't have so large a presence in the TCM lineup.  There's a certain set of movies we're treated to that show up with reliability--of course, they're the best of his filmography.  There's a good sampling from his career tomorrow, except for his early poverty row stuff.  All of the movies slated have been shown before, including two of his Rio--  movies.  Two I'm not familiar with:  Big Jim McClain (1952), and Tall in the Saddle (1944).  Could there be a Rio Oro among them?

 

Take your pick from the rest.  Mine is She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949).  Watch Brannigan (1974), if you want to see Judy Geeson.

 

Themes in John Wayne films:

 

Use of the word 'Rio' in the title.

Use of the word 'Big' in the title.

Character names that begin with 'Mc.'

Military man with estranged wife, and rarely seen son.

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Both versions of WATERLOO BRIDGE are highly recommended and are interesting to compare.

 

I mean the 1940 MGM version with Vivien Leigh and the 1931(?) version with Mae Clarke- who is also a SUTS honoree this year and whose day is coming up. Surely they are showing the James Whale-helmed version she did for Universal?

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-Gunga Din, I recorded this more for Cary Grant, but I have a feeling he's miscast.

you've never seen it, I gather? It is excelelnt, he is excellent, everyone and everything in it is excellent. If you haven't seen it yet, you are in for a treat.

 

 

I made sure to record The Breaking Point since it was so highly recommended.  I'm thinking of doing a double feature and watching To Have and Have Not and then follow it up with The Breaking Point so that I can compare. 

There is no comparison, and not just on the level that plot, dialogue and characterwise they have no similarities at all, but also in quality. THE BREAKING POINT is one of the best films of the 1950's; TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT features two all-time great performances, but outside of that it is "meh"-sville. KEY LARGO has a lot of similarites to THE BREAKING POINT though.

 

I also recorded Hud which I understand may have experienced some technical difficulties.  I'll have to check out how my satellite feed looked and see if it ruins the overall viewing experience.

I saw no technical difficulties and I watched the airing.

 

 

I still have The Roman Spring of Mrs. Stone recorded on the DVR from last time it was on.  I'm not sure if I'll like the film or not, but I always find the Tennessee Williams' plays turned films interesting.

It is. Depressing, and ambiguously ended, but it is interesting. A (typically) wonderful performance by Vivien Leigh that I wish had found room on the Best Actress list that year (1961)- but that was a terrific year for leading performances by women,
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For all his stature as an actor, John Wayne doesn't have so large a presence in the TCM lineup. There's a certain set of movies we're treated to that show up with reliability--of course, they're the best of his filmography. There's a good sampling from his career tomorrow, except for his early poverty row stuff. All of the movies slated have been shown before, including two of his Rio-- movies. Two I'm not familiar with: Big Jim McClain (1952), and Tall in the Saddle (1944). Could there be a Rio Oro among them?

 

Take your pick from the rest. Mine is She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949). Watch Brannigan (1974), if you want to see Judy Geeson.

 

Themes in John Wayne films:

 

Use of the word 'Rio' in the title.

Use of the word 'Big' in the title.

Character names that begin with 'Mc.'

Military man with estranged wife, and rarely seen son.

I feel like Wayne gets plenty of play on TCM. He's been Star of the Month at least twice and SUTS honoree a couple of times. I know a lot of his films from the 30's don't get shown as much, but his films from the 40's and 50's are shown regularly, especially The Searchers. The 60's& 70's films aren't on as much but they're still part of the regular schedule.

 

He's been Star of the Month three times 9/98 5/07 and 4/14

 

He was part of Summer under the Stars six times 2004, 2005, 2006,2009, 2012 and 2015.

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Themes in John Wayne films:

 

Use of the word 'Rio' in the title.

Use of the word 'Big' in the title.

Character names that begin with 'Mc.'

Military man with estranged wife, and rarely seen son.

 

 

I wish that TCM was airing RIO GRANDE during John Wayne's day.

I saw part of the movioe when it aired when Maureen O'Hara was Star of the Month, but I haven't seen it since then

It was interesting seeing Claude Jarman Jr (best known as the kid from THE YEARLING) in an adult role.

Boy, did his voice change.

 

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Oh boy!  Oh boy!  Oh boy!  Oh boy!  Now, this is a day I've really been looking forward to.  Mae Clark is one of my very very favorite actresses.  I always make a point of seeing movies she's in.  It looks like there is a good selection of her movies from all through her career.  When Mae Clark is the subject of discussion, one topic inevitably comes up, the famous scene in The Public Enemy--yes, that scene.  Just as inevitably, it's commented on how her career was hamstrung by it.  Miss Clark, I have heard, said she herself was grateful for it, because long after her name was forgotten, people remembered the scene.  It led to a lot of work for her.  Of course, you could say she was just being a good sport.  I take her at her word, for to be honest, she wasn't a great actress.  She wasn't even a very good one, either.  Still, she managed to have an extensive career, and be in a number of the most important movies ever made.  Aside from Enemy, there was Frankenstein (1931), The Front Page (1931), and  the original (and only) version of Waterloo Bridge (1931).  Her best role was the last.  It might be ungenerous on my part, but I think her performance in it was due in a good part to James Whale.

 

It's hard to choose from the lineup, but one rarely on is one of her few starring roles in Parole Girl (1933), which has the added benefit of having a brilliant comic performance by another of my favorite actresses, Marie Prevost.

 

Turn Back the Clock (1933), is new to me.  With Lee Tracy!

 

Fast Workers (1933), also with John Gilbert, and Robert Armstrong.

 

And I'll also include This Side of Heaven (1934), with Lionel Barrymore, and Fay Bainter.

 

And do catch, or record, The Front Page, alas, the last movie in the lineup, and in the middle of the night for many.  I prefer it to His Girl Friday (1940), but by just a little.  It's the movie that gives the lie to the claim that sound anchored the camera and resulted in static shots.  It was the directors that got static.

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slaytonf--"Fast Workers" !1933)-- Must be worth seeing, because it's Pre-Code.  Is also one of John Gilberts' few talkies, & is directed by Tod Browning, who directed "Freaks" (1932). BTW--film is only 66 minutes long--ignore Maltin's rating.  

 

All times E.S.T.

 

8:00 a.m.--"Mohawk"--(1956)--hasn't been shown since 2010,  Clarke has 8th billing.

 

8:00 p.m.--"Waterloo Bridge"--(1931)--Clarke's best performance.

 

9:30 p.m. "Frankenstein"--(1931)

 

10:45--"Fast Workers"--(1933)

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Good advice, Filmlover as ignoring anything written by Maltin is always a wise decision. I've seen this film with Gilbert before which I watched mostly to hear his much discussed voice. As I recall the criticisms of its timbre seem very unwarranted.

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Slayton, I saw that you stated that Mae Clark was one of your favorites.  I have never heard of her before learning that she was selected as a SUTS honoree.  So this will be a new experience for me. 

 

I know that I have Public Enemy.  I think it's part of the TCM Greatest Gangsters Collection: James Cagney that I own, so I won't be recording that.  I haven't seen it yet, so I'll definitely have to make time to watch it soon.

 

Looking over the schedule, I think I'm going to record:

 

Turn Back the Clock, a Mae Clark/Lee Tracy precode, with apparently an appearance by the Three Stooges.  The Three Stooges aren't my favorite 1930s slapstick team, but they have their moments.

 

Penthouse.  A pre-code with one of my favorites-- Myrna Loy!  Loy playing a call-girl no less.  This sounds interesting. 

 

Parole Girl.  These pre-code women's prison movies are amusing.  A woman's prison looks like a walk in the park in the 1930s.

 

The Man With Two Faces.  I like Edward G. Robinson and Mary Astor.

 

Waterloo Bridge.  I unfortunately forgot to record the Vivien Leigh version after I said I was going to on this thread and it was on wayyy too early for me to be able to do it before work.  This version (the "good" version as I understand it based on opinions on the message board) is a pre-code (about prostitutes no less) and is a very early Bette Davis film.  Count me in!

 

Frankenstein.  I've never seen this film.  I'd like to see what made Boris Karloff so famous.

 

Lady Killer.  A James Cagney film I haven't seen.  (I've been trying to catch more Cagney films).

 

Wow.  This day is going to do nothing to clear off space on my DVR.  At least a lot of the pre code films are short.

 

 

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Well, speedie (if you don't mind the liberty), you have a full plate.  As far as I can see, there are people that prefer the 1931, and there are those that prefer the 1940 version of Waterloo Bridge.  And there are those that like both.  I like the earlier version.  James Whale's direction is wonderful, as always, from the first crane shot in to the theater stage, to the final vertical over the bridge.  The performances are naturalistic and unaffected, as if we were watching conversation.  It's a quality you see in some pre code-enforcement movies, but vanishes when the Powers clamped down, and doesn't reappear until way on the other end of the production code era.  It may have been too delicate to survive the draconian measures.  Kent Douglass, as has been mentioned, is notable.  He was exceptional for his conversational tone.

 

The Viven Leigh version of Waterloo Bridge shows up on TCM regularly, so don't despair.

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What role did Mae Clarke have in Big Hand for the Little Lady? (shown this morning) I dont remember her in that. Must've been a small part. Took me awhile to figure out who's day it was today (using my cable TCM schedule)..........

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I remember when 'A Big Hand for the Little Lady' played in our theater back in 1966. None of us knew anything about it.

 

What a delightful, surprising movie for that era. I remember the audiences really enjoying it.

 

Jason Robards is absolutely brilliant!

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Did Mae Clarke have a large role in [PENTHOUSE]? 

 

Not really. She's in for about 8-10 minutes, looking good in a sequin-wrap dress. Then she's MURDERED.

Myrna Loy isn't in it much either, she doesn't show up until at least half an hour in; I have a suspicion it was released after she hit it big in THE THIN MAN and they moved her billing up.

It was a very unfocused movie and the plot confused the hell out of me.

The male lead was not interesting or likeable or particularly charismatic.

Maltin gave it three and a half stars, make what you will of that.

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