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SUTS picks, day by day.


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I remember when 'A Big Hand for the Little Lady' played in our theater back in 1966. None of us knew anything about it.

 

What a delightful, surprising movie for that era. I remember the audiences really enjoying it.

 

Jason Robards is absolutely brilliant!

 

Yes. I didnt see it until on tv many years later. An overlooked gem...........

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Not really. She's in for about 8-10 minutes, looking good in a sequin-wrap dress. Then she's MURDERED.

Myrna Loy isn't in it much either, she doesn't show up until at least half an hour in; I have a suspicion it was released after she hit it big in THE THIN MAN and they moved her billing up.

It was a very unfocused movie and the plot confused the hell out of me.

The male lead was not interesting or likeable or particularly charismatic.

Maltin gave it three and a half stars, make what you will of that.

Why did you have to spoil the plot? I know you didn't care for the movie but Holden may have wanted to watch it.

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It's really not a spoiler that Mae Clarke is murdered in PENTHOUSE; it happens very early on and is one of like, five conflicting plots going on at once. Trust me, knowing that going in will do nothing towards spoiling any aspect of PENTHOUSE.

 

I stand by it to the point where I'm not even going to go back and edit it out.

 

...now if i had revealed how WATERLOO BRIDGE ends, that would be a **** move.

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It's really not a spoiler that Mae Clarke is murdered in PENTHOUSE; it happens very early on and is one of like, five conflicting plots going on at once. Trust me, knowing that going in will do nothing towards spoiling any aspect of PENTHOUSE.

 

I stand by it to the point where I'm not even going to go back and edit it out.

 

...now if i had revealed how WATERLOO BRIDGE ends, that would be a **** move.

 

You can tell yourself whatever you like, but when Holden asked how big a part Mae had in the movie, he wasn't asking to be told what happens to her.

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Not really. She's in for about 8-10 minutes, looking good in a sequin-wrap dress. Then she's MURDERED.

Myrna Loy isn't in it much either, she doesn't show up until at least half an hour in; I have a suspicion it was released after she hit it big in THE THIN MAN and they moved her billing up.

It was a very unfocused movie and the plot confused the hell out of me.

The male lead was not interesting or likeable or particularly charismatic.

Maltin gave it three and a half stars, make what you will of that.

 

I love Penthouse, but it's one of those movies where you have to really like the actors no matter what in order to like the film.  And I really like Warner Baxter, Myrna Loy, and particularly Nat Pendleton.   Mae Clarke is almost an afterthought; she gets much better roles in other movies, even if in her most famous role she gets upstaged by a grapefruit.

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It would have been difficult, it seems, for TCM to air all of Alan Arkin's better known movies.  So they made a decisión solomón and cut away a number of them to make room for new material.

 

Full Moon High (1981), yet another in the lineage of teenage American werewolf movies.  This one has the advantage of having Ed McMahon in it. (Say, was there ever a teenage girl who was an American werewolf?)

 

Cooperstown (1993), which, if I am not mistaken, is the first actual TV movie ever aired on TCM (can Isn't it Shocking be far behind?).  The fact that Turner Pictures was involved in the production is entirely coincidental.  Keep your eye out for Hope Lange, if yer interested in her.

 

Simon (1980).  A man is brainwashed into thinking he's an alien.  What people won't do to get Madeline Kahn into a movie.  Also with Fred Gwynne and Louise Lasser--alas, only her voice.

 

Popi (1969).  A Russian Jew playing a Puerto Rican, playing a Cuban.  Now that's acting.  There are some real latínos in it, too. like Rita Moreno.

 

The In-Laws (1979), in which Mr. Arkin plays straight man to the remarkable, inimitable, Peter Falk playing a borderline psychopath prospective brother-in-law, who leads the shy, reserved schlub into all manner of zany, madcap, adventures, violating all his proprieties, at the same time making his life richer, in many senses of the word.

 

The rest you know about.

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I love Penthouse, but it's one of those movies where you have to really like the actors no matter what in order to like the film.  And I really like Warner Baxter, Myrna Loy, and particularly Nat Pendleton.   Mae Clarke is almost an afterthought; she gets much better roles in other movies, even if in her most famous role she gets upstaged by a grapefruit.

She didn't get much respect in Parole Girl either. Again, eating a grapefruit (bet they were cheap back then) but this time slapped upside the head by Ralph Bellamy. Ralph Bellamy!

 

I guess there was no feminism in 1933.

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What role did Mae Clarke have in Big Hand for the Little Lady? (shown this morning) I dont remember her in that. Must've been a small part. Took me awhile to figure out who's day it was today (using my cable TCM schedule)..........

 

She appears toward the end of the movie as a customer withdrawing money from the bank as the Little Lady and the poker players enter it when she goes there to get a loan secured by her cards.

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She appears toward the end of the movie as a customer withdrawing money from the bank as the Little Lady and the poker players enter it when she goes there to get a loan secured by her cards.

 

 

LOL. I see. Probably a day's work. I'll have to watch for her the next time I watch it. I checked imdb and she's listed 16th in the acting credits......

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LOL. I see. Probably a day's work. I'll have to watch for her the next time I watch it. I checked imdb and she's listed 16th in the acting credits......

 

Yes.  Likely one of those roles she got as she said as a result of people remembering that scene.

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I love Penthouse, but it's one of those movies where you have to really like the actors no matter what in order to like the film.  And I really like Warner Baxter, Myrna Loy, and particularly Nat Pendleton.   Mae Clarke is almost an afterthought; she gets much better roles in other movies, even if in her most famous role she gets upstaged by a grapefruit.

 

I liked the actors, save Baxter who didn't come off as anything special to me, but it was like the film didn't want to spend too much time with any of them (aside from Baxter- who ironically, was the least interesting character.)

 

It was a film with a decided case of Attention Deficit Disorder- honestly reminding me a little bit of THE SIMPSONS, which made a running gag out of the fact that the first 6-8 minutes of the show usually had nothing to do with what the main plot of the episode is going to become:

 

So it's about this reporter....no wait, it's about this gangster...no wait, it's about the gangster's lawyer... now it's about the gangster's lawyer's troubled marriage....wait, no, now it's about the boyfriend of the wife of the gangster's lawyer...now it's about the girlfriend of the the boyfriend of the estranged wife of the lawyer who represents the gangster...oops, now it's about her murder...Now here's Myrna Loy half an hour into this thing and I don't even know why she's here....

 

An hour in and I was practically screaming at the television:

"KEE-RIPES! JUST PICK SOMETHING TO BE ABOUT, MOVIE, AND THEN BE ABOUT IT!"

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I liked the actors, save Baxter who didn't come off as anything special to me, but it was like the film didn't want to spend too much time with any of them (aside from Baxter- who ironically, was the least interesting character.)

 

It was a film with a decided case of Attention Deficit Disorder- honestly reminding me a little bit of THE SIMPSONS, which made a running gag out of the fact that the first 6-8 minutes of the show usually had nothing to do with what the main plot of the episode is going to become:

 

So it's about this reporter....no wait, it's about this gangster...no wait, it's about the gangster's lawyer... now it's about the gangster's lawyer's troubled marriage....wait, no, now it's about the boyfriend of the wife of the gangster's lawyer...now it's about the girlfriend of the the boyfriend of the estranged wife of the lawyer who represents the gangster...oops, now it's about her murder...Now here's Myrna Loy half an hour into this thing and I don't even know why she's here....

 

An hour in and I was practically screaming at the television:

"KEE-RIPES! JUST PICK SOMETHING TO BE ABOUT, MOVIE, AND THEN BE ABOUT IT!"

I watched Penthouse even though I had seen it before.  Thought it was a very good movie and had no problem understanding what it was about.  Not at all confusing. It was about exactly what the Now Showing Guide said it was about.

On the other hand, also watched The Fall Guy and that one really wandered around some.  Basically though, it was boring, but I did watch all of it.

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Cooperstown (1993), which, if I am not mistaken, is the first actual TV movie ever aired on TCM (can Isn't it Shocking be far behind?).  The fact that Turner Pictures was involved in the production is entirely coincidental.  Keep your eye out for Hope Lange, if yer interested in her.

 

 

 

TCM aired COLD SASSY TREE during Faye Dunaway's day during last year's Summer Under The Stars.

I think it was also Turner (TNT?) production.   

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TCM aired COLD SASSY TREE during Faye Dunaway's day during last year's Summer Under The Stars.

I think it was also Turner (TNT?) production.   

 

Thanks for the info.  IMDB says it was indeed TNT that produced it, and lists it as a a TV movie.

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Tomorrow looks like it is Marlene Dietrich day...

 

I think the only Dietrich movie I have seen is Touch of Evil and she's only in it for a few minutes, but it was a powerful few minutes. 

 

I already have a few Dietrich films on my DVR when they aired the last time:

 

The Garden of Allah

Witness For The Prosecution

Stage Freight

 

I might have The Blue Angel already, but I cannot remember.

 

What I do want to record for sure is A Foreign Affair because I like Billy Wilder and Jean Arthur.  Also, I don't think of Marlene Dietrich in a comedy, so that will be interesting.

 

I also want to see Judgement at Nuremberg

 

I also want to see Kismet

 

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TCM aired COLD SASSY TREE during Faye Dunaway's day during last year's Summer Under The Stars.

I think it was also Turner (TNT?) production.   

 

If TCM is starting to show us made-for-cable movies, that's a very good sign. Lots of excellent ones to see.

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If TCM is starting to show us made-for-cable movies, that's a very good sign. Lots of excellent ones to see.

 

It would be great if they aired ANGELS IN AMERICA.

 

After I saw that the for the first time I remember thinking I wish I hadn't seen it because it was so good I'd like see it all new again.

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Tomorrow looks like it is Marlene Dietrich day...

 

I think the only Dietrich movie I have seen is Touch of Evil and she's only in it for a few minutes, but it was a powerful few minutes. 

 

I already have a few Dietrich films on my DVR when they aired the last time:

 

The Garden of Allah

Witness For The Prosecution

Stage Freight

 

I might have The Blue Angel already, but I cannot remember.

 

What I do want to record for sure is A Foreign Affair because I like Billy Wilder and Jean Arthur.  Also, I don't think of Marlene Dietrich in a comedy, so that will be interesting.

 

I also want to see Judgement at Nuremberg

 

I also want to see Kismet

 

Dietrich is one of my favorites, so I can easily agree with your choices and hope you enjoy them.  At the risk of overkill, I would also recommend Knight Without Honour.  Not sure if you have an opinion on Robert Donat (probably best known for Goodbye Mr. Chips), but he and Dietrich are both excellent in this.

 

I hesitate to recommend things because no matter what there are those who will disagree, but for this one I can't help myself.  A few years ago I happened to start watching the beginning of KWH, and it carried me away for the the remainder of the film.

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For the great Marlene Dietrich, we have the same condition as with other well-represented stars.  There are no new movies in the schedule.  Still, there is always something to look forward to, and her day is no exception:

 

Although her cameo appearance is a slender justification to include it, Around the World in Eighty Days (1956) is a diverting picaresque pic that's good to while away an odd three hours you might have laying about with nothing to fill them--if only for spotting the movie stars and character actors (and they are myriad) that populate the screen.  But there's more than that, David Niven shoulders the considerable burden of carrying this movie quite effortlessly--just in the manner, in fact, of Phileas Fogg, his character.  He and Cantinflas have an engaging chemistry.  And if Shirley MacClaine, an unconvincing Indian princess, representing the third leg of a triad, functions somewhat as a fifth wheel, it's not a great handicap to the movie, as she is still a doll.

 

The Blue Angel (1930).  A classic in the classic sense of the word (whatever that is).  The movie that started Miss Dietrich on her well deserved career of film stardom.  Emil Jannings, a towering figure in cinema, in many ways, like his character in the movie, is putty in her hands as an actor, and cut down to size.

 

Shanghai Express (1932).  About the pinnacle of b/w cinematography, demonstrating it's ability to produce subtle, mesmerizing images color can't match.  Miss Dietrich is as gorgeous and sexy here as anywhere else, evincing frequent collaborator Josef von Sternberg's, and Lee Garmes ability. She plays a courtesan of the far East, unaccountably in love with what must be the biggest drip of an English officer ever to appear on screen.  The two re-encounter each other on a train, still experiencing the residual effects of a previous affair, embittered by its miserable end--and still in love.  This against the backdrop of revolutionary China, contending warlords, and some of the best train photography in film.  And to cap it off, Anna May Wong, Marlene's asian counterpart, and confederate, in one of her best roles.

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It would be great if they aired ANGLES IN AMERICA.

 

After I saw that the for the first time I remember thinking I wish I hadn't seen it because it was so good I'd like see it all new again.

 

I dunno, Holden. I've heard some parts of that movie can be rather "obtuse"!!!

 

(...sorry, couldn't resist) ;)

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I dunno, Holden. I've heard some parts of that movie can be rather "obtuse"!!!

 

(...sorry, couldn't resist) ;)

 

Dargo, I completely deserved that one.

No apology necessary from you.

 

I've corrected my original post.

 

It was very late when I posted that.

 

(Alternate explanation: ANGLES IN AMERICA is the musical version starring Adele Dazeem.)

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To all unaware, it's worth it to DVR MANPOWER (1941), which is on at 2:00 am Sunday morning. It's a film made at the low point in the careers of Dietrich and Edward G. Robinson, and the high point in the career of George Raft.

 

mpwr.jpg

 

It's one of those baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaad movies that you watch with your chin on the ground for the whole thing, but really worth taking in for its place as one weirdass, misguided, daffy movie; quite clearly written and directed by someone who had serious issues with women.

 

ps- I posted this also in the YESTERDAY TODAY AND TOMORROW thread, but I saw some people were talking about what Marlene films to DVR today.

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Dietrich is one of my favorites, so I can easily agree with your choices and hope you enjoy them.  At the risk of overkill, I would also recommend Knight Without Honour.  Not sure if you have an opinion on Robert Donat (probably best known for Goodbye Mr. Chips), but he and Dietrich are both excellent in this.

 

I hesitate to recommend things because no matter what there are those who will disagree, but for this one I can't help myself.  A few years ago I happened to start watching the beginning of KWH, and it carried me away for the the remainder of the film.

Fascinating. I guess American moviegoers in 1948 were REALLY ready to move on.

 

'Isn't It Romantic' and many double entendres played out against a backdrop of a bombed, burnt out Berlin in A Foreign Affair. What war. What loss of life. What concentration camps.

 

Wow. What an insulting movie.

 

I never did like Dietrich, but I am disappointed in Arthur.

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