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SHADOW OF A DOUBT (1943)


PrinceSaliano
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UNIVERSAL DISTRIBUTOR, 1943:

 

  1. Moonlight in Vermont (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  2. 'Gung Ho!': The Story of Carlson's Makin Island Raiders (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  3. Meatless Tuesday (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  4. Calling Dr. Death (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  5. Swingtime Johnny (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  6. She's for Me (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  7. His Butler's Sister (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  8. Choo Choo Swing (1943) ... Distributor
  9. Never a Dull Moment (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  10. Adventure for Two (1943) ... Distributor (1945) (USA) (theatrical)
  11. The Mad Ghoul (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  12. Son of Dracula (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  13. New Orleans Blues (1943) ... Distributor
  14. Flesh and Fantasy (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  15. You're a Lucky Fellow, Mr. Smith (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  16. Crazy House (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  17. Hi'ya, Sailor (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  18. Corvette K-225 (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  19. Boogie Woogie Man Will Get You If You Don't Watch Out (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  20. Always a Bridesmaid (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  21. Sherlock Holmes Faces Death (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  22. Top Man (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  23. Arizona Trail (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  24. Larceny with Music (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  25. The Strange Death of Adolf Hitler (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  26. Adventures of the Flying Cadets (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  27. Andy Panda's Victory Garden (1943) ... Distributor
  28. Fired Wife (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  29. So's Your Uncle (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  30. Pass the Biscuits Mirandy! (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  31. Phantom of the Opera (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  32. Frontier Badmen (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  33. The Lone Star Trail (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  34. The Man in Grey (1943) ... Distributor (1945) (USA) (theatrical)
  35. South Sea Rhythms (1943) ... Distributor
  36. We've Never Been Licked (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  37. Ration Bored (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  38. Honeymoon Lodge (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  39. Hers to Hold (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  40. Gals, Incorporated (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  41. Don't Be a Sucker (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  42. Frontier Law (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  43. Canine Commandos (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  44. Confusion in India (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  45. Get Going (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical) (as Universal Pictures Corporation)
  46. The Armless Dentist (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  47. Two Tickets to London (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  48. All by Myself (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  49. Captive Wild Woman (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  50. Hit the Ice (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  51. Mirror of Sub-Marine Life (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  52. Mister Big (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  53. What We Are Fighting For (1943) ... Distributor
  54. Cowboy in Manhattan (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  55. The Dizzy Acrobat (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  56. Raiders of San Joaquin (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  57. Follow the Band (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  58. Good Morning, Judge (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  59. Swing Your Partner (1943/II) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  60. White Savage (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  61. Sherlock Holmes in Washington (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  62. Rhythm of the Islands (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  63. Cheyenne Roundup (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  64. Don Winslow of the Coast Guard (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  65. Dancing on the Stars (1943) ... Distributor
  66. Russian Revels (1943) ... Distributor
  67. Keep 'Em Slugging (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  68. The Egg Cracker Suite (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  69. He's My Guy (1943) ... Distributor (1945) (USA) (theatrical)
  70. It Ain't Hay (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  71. Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  72. Hungry India (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  73. Hi, Buddy (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  74. Hi'ya, Chum (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  75. The Amazing Mrs. Holliday (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  76. The Screwball (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical), Distributor (1949) (USA) (theatrical) (re-release)
  77. Hit Tune Jamboree (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical), Distributor
  78. Tenting Tonight on the Old Camp Ground (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  79. Mother of Presidents (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  80. Variety Views, #116 (1943) ... Distributor
  81. It Comes Up Love (1943) ... Distributor
  82. Winter Sports Jamboree (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  83. Shadow of a Doubt (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical) (as A Universal Picture)
  84. The Adventures of Smilin' Jack (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
  85. Cow-Cow Boogie (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical), Distributor (1949) (USA) (theatrical) (re-release)
  86. How's About It (1943) ... Distributor (1943) (USA) (theatrical)
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Hi film and prince,

 

I just listed all the Universal-distributed films of 1943. Some are shorts and cartoons.

 

The major companies are listed on every main IMDB movie-title page, and it is fun to look up all the films that the major studios made. There were many thousands of them. Oh how I wish they could dig all of those films out of the vaults and rent them all to TCM. The airing of each and every one, just one time each, could go on for many years.

 

Ahhh, daydreaming again.

 

:)

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There's not a shadow of a doubt that this is one of the most misleading thread titles I've ever seen here.

Come on, Prince Saliano, couldn't you do better than that? Clearly your thread is not about the Hitchcock film at all, but about your desire for TCM to show more Universal titles. Fair enough, but why not make it clear in the thread title that that's what it's about?

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There's not a shadow of a doubt that this is one of the most misleading thread titles I've ever seen here.

Come on, Prince Saliano, couldn't you do better than that? Clearly your thread is not about the Hitchcock film at all, but about your desire for TCM to show more Universal titles. Fair enough, but why not make it clear in the thread title that that's what it's about?

Your suggestion will be given due consideration.

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I can see why Hitchcock said that SHADOW OF A DOUBT 1943 was his favorite film. The roles of Uncle Charlie and his niece could not have been cast better. Teresa goes through all the right emotions of loving, fearing, and hating her uncle. Joseph Cotton had the ability to go from a loving relative, putting on a good appearance, to become a secretive, hateful, and criminal man. He was so good in parts like this. I an thinking of Niagara 1953 with Marilyn Monroe. Hume Cronyn was no slouch himself. In four years he went from the meek and mildmannered neighbor Herb, to the sadistic Captain than Warden Munsey in BRUTE FORCE 1947. I have often wondered why in the 1930`s and 1940`s the parents always seemed old enough to be the childrens grandparents. I guess the actors and actresses of that era did not want to look older having children. An exception is Joan Crawford in MILDRED PIERCE, and Barbara Stanwyck in MY REPUTATION 1946.

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A wonderful film with wonderful characters and performances.  Patricia Collinge makes one of her rare film appearances as the mother - such a delicate, fragile characterization.  This film includes one of my all-time favorite lines, "I'm afraid I'll have to ahsk you for that film - I don't like to be photographed."

 

Dimitri Tiomkin's score is also first-rate and his wild, devilish pizzicato as Young Charlie reads the newspaper article about the Merry Widow murderer is one of the earliest music cues that made a strong impression on me as a kid watching the film on WOR-TV.

 

 

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TCM showed this Universal pic the other night. Universal released a lot of films in 1943...how about showing ALL BY MYSELF; CRAZY HOUSE; FIRED WIFE; FRONTIER BADMEN; THE MAD GHOUL; TWO TICKETS TO LONDON; WE'VE NEVER BEEN LICKED; YOU'RE A LUCKY FELLOW, MR. SMITH...

 

Crazy House. I haven't seen that picture in thirty some odd years. Being in the customer service biz, every once in a while I belt out, "Three cheers for the customer! The customer is always right..."

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I can see why Hitchcock said that SHADOW OF A DOUBT 1943 was his favorite film. The roles of Uncle Charlie and his niece could not have been cast better. Teresa goes through all the right emotions of loving, fearing, and hating her uncle. Joseph Cotton had the ability to go from a loving relative, putting on a good appearance, to become a secretive, hateful, and criminal man. He was so good in parts like this. I an thinking of Niagara 1953 with Marilyn Monroe. Hume Cronyn was no slouch himself. In four years he went from the meek and mildmannered neighbor Herb, to the sadistic Captain than Warden Munsey in BRUTE FORCE 1947. I have often wondered why in the 1930`s and 1940`s the parents always seemed old enough to be the childrens grandparents. I guess the actors and actresses of that era did not want to look older having children. An exception is Joan Crawford in MILDRED PIERCE, and Barbara Stanwyck in MY REPUTATION 1946.

 

Yup. My fave Hitchcock too.

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I can see why Hitchcock said that SHADOW OF A DOUBT 1943 was his favorite film. The roles of Uncle Charlie and his niece could not have been cast better. Teresa goes through all the right emotions of loving, fearing, and hating her uncle. Joseph Cotton had the ability to go from a loving relative, putting on a good appearance, to become a secretive, hateful, and criminal man. He was so good in parts like this. I an thinking of Niagara 1953 with Marilyn Monroe. Hume Cronyn was no slouch himself. In four years he went from the meek and mildmannered neighbor Herb, to the sadistic Captain than Warden Munsey in BRUTE FORCE 1947. I have often wondered why in the 1930`s and 1940`s the parents always seemed old enough to be the childrens grandparents. I guess the actors and actresses of that era did not want to look older having children. An exception is Joan Crawford in MILDRED PIERCE, and Barbara Stanwyck in MY REPUTATION 1946.

In those days many 40 year olds LOOKED like they were 60. That's why many parents looked  like today's grandparents.

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I can see why Hitchcock said that SHADOW OF A DOUBT 1943 was his favorite film. The roles of Uncle Charlie and his niece could not have been cast better. Teresa goes through all the right emotions of loving, fearing, and hating her uncle. Joseph Cotton had the ability to go from a loving relative, putting on a good appearance, to become a secretive, hateful, and criminal man. He was so good in parts like this. I an thinking of Niagara 1953 with Marilyn Monroe.

 

I've never seen the love for Shadow Of A Doubt, which IMO is among Hitchcock's very few bad films. Uncle Charlie gave off so many creepy and paranoid vibes throughout the whole movie that I find it impossible to believe that any real life family could have been taken him at face value for as long as they did, in spite of any past relationships with him.

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I've never seen the love for Shadow Of A Doubt, which IMO is among Hitchcock's very few bad films. Uncle Charlie gave off so many creepy and paranoid vibes throughout the whole movie that I find it impossible to believe that any real life family could have been taken him at face value for as long as they did, in spite of any past relationships with him.

Agreed, but I still think it's a pretty good film-----certainly not one of Hitchcock's best.

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 Patricia Collinge makes one of her rare film appearances as the mother - such a delicate, fragile characterization. 

 

Yes!

 

Really enjoyed the double feature last night of Collinge's films, first THE LITTLE FOXES, wherein she gives one of the finest supporting turns of the whole decade (just masterful work), and then SHADOW OF A DOUBT (which for the record, is a film I'd put in my Top Ten of all Time if ever I were forced.)

 

She says SO MUCH without saying a word in both films...God, I wish she had made more movies, just a fantastic actress.

 

ps- you just know her fragile mother in SHADOW OF A DOUBT probably won't live long after getting the news about Uncle Charlie.

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I've never seen the love for Shadow Of A Doubt, which IMO is among Hitchcock's very few bad films. Uncle Charlie gave off so many creepy and paranoid vibes throughout the whole movie that I find it impossible to believe that any real life family could have been taken him at face value for as long as they did, in spite of any past relationships with him.

 

But they don't.

The father clearly doesn't buy the act, even more after Uncle Charlie visits him at the bank and makes such an **** of himself. And neither do the children- Anne (the bespectacled girl child) immediately doesn't trust him, the little boy later almost flat-out refuses to sit by him at dinner, and only obliges after his mother gives him a nasty look. And even the mother has the vaguest frame of a suspicion- there's a wonderful tight shot of Paticia Collinge as she drives off to attend the party once little little Charlie has been rescued from the garage (and earlier avoids falling through the rigged stairs), she mouths the words to herself about how strange it all has been "first the steps, now this..." She knows.

 

It's, again, a film where a lot happens beneath the surface- wonderfully directed and acted, and not in a showy way.

 

I think if it does have any flaws, it's in the scene where the detectives use the extended rouse to get in to the house.

 

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I've never seen the love for Shadow Of A Doubt, which IMO is among Hitchcock's very few bad films. Uncle Charlie gave off so many creepy and paranoid vibes throughout the whole movie that I find it impossible to believe that any real life family could have been taken him at face value for as long as they did, in spite of any past relationships with him.

It seems to me that we've had this same conversation before, Andy, with you making the same point about the "obviousness" of Uncle Charlie's creepiness undermining the credibility of a film asking the viewer to believe that his family doesn't pick up on it. Fine, it doesn't work for you.

 

But it does work for me, and I find it believable. It works because it's completely credible that a family who "loves" good ol' Uncle Charlie will be largely blind to any idiocycracies (like not wanting his photograph taken) and, sure as heck, wouldn't think he was, or could be, a psychopathic serial killer.

 

Hitchcock lets the viewer know from his very first shot of Uncle Charlie that there is something "off" about him. That deadpan expression and monotone voice, plus a little thing like hiding and running from the police. Only to see him then arrive in his family's home town and adopt a personality of warmth and charm when he is greeted by his sister's family. It's like a click going off in his mind, with "affable personality" now in "On" mode.

 

This is one of Hitchcock's very best films, in my opinion, with strong performances from the entire cast, and, for my money, the performance of his career from Joseph Cotten, who is, alternately, charming and chilling in the same film., There's that memorable Hitchcock closeup of the actor's profile as he sits at the family table talking (now in that deadly monotone voice once again) about the uselessness of elderly women. Teresa Wright suddenly interjects, "But they're human!" Cotten turns towards the camera, now in closeup of his full face. "Are they?" he asks her with hooded eyes and a deadpan expression.

 

imagesWR303Z0Q_zps2cbzwwwr.jpg

 

Uncle Charlie's external fascade of charm and affability have been wiped away in a moment in which the director and actor lets us see the real man. Only Teresa Wright at this moment is strongly suspicious. The rest of the family find it an "odd" moment that they quickly dismiss, particularly the Uncle's sister who loves him with a devotion as though belief in him was a crucial part of her very existence. A great moment in a great film, the director at his most quietly effective here, in my opinion.

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As an old time amateur photographer, I can unequivocately state that one not wanting their picture taken is probably the WIDEST shared "idiosyncracy".  Nothing about that struck me strange(plus since we, the audience, already KNEW why!)

 

I always liked this movie.  Even the remake in the '50's; STEP DOWN TO TERROR with Charles Drake.

 

 

Sepiatone

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I've always considered Shadow of a Doubt as just a good movie; not one of Hitchcock's best. I always felt the plot was weak (especially with the detective subplot); the film's strength is more in its characters. I always felt this was a good character study of a psychopath, how other characters respond to him, and their awareness of his façade. 

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I've always considered Shadow of a Doubt as just a good movie; not one of Hitchcock's best. I always felt the plot was weak (especially with the detective subplot); the film's strength is more in its characters. I always felt this was a good character study of a psychopath, how other characters respond to him, and their awareness of his façade. 

Teresa Wright was great in her early years. Oscar agreed with many early nominations. Somehow it all fizzled out for her.

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I've never seen the love for Shadow Of A Doubt, which IMO is among Hitchcock's very few bad films. Uncle Charlie gave off so many creepy and paranoid vibes throughout the whole movie that I find it impossible to believe that any real life family could have been taken him at face value for as long as they did, in spite of any past relationships with him.

 

That was the old days, back before large numbers of serial killers lived in this country.

 

Every family had an odd Uncle Charlie back then, but that didn't mean he killed people. It just meant he was odd ol' Uncle Charlie. :)

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That was the old days, back before large numbers of serial killers lived in this country.

 

Every family had an odd Uncle Charlie back then, but that didn't mean he killed people. It just meant he was odd ol' Uncle Charlie. :)

Every family? Maybe some families. Not my family, where everyone was completely normal.

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