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Singin' In The Rain/Good Morning


lydecker
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Does anyone know how many takes it took to accomplish "Good Morning" in Singin' In The Rain?

I know Gene Kelly was not exactly thrilled about having to use Debbie Reynolds in the film but she

does very credible dancing in "Good Morning"   --  even though Donald O'Connor and Gene Kelly do dance around her a good bit.  Still, she is utterly charming (and I am not even much of a DR fan)  and I can't imagine this film without her. 

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I don't know the exact number of takes for the entire routine, though supposedly it was like 40 or something takes for the end part where they flip the couch over and fall into it.  I think the shoot took place during a 12-15 hour day or something.  Debbie Reynolds supposedly had to be carried to her dressing room after they were done because her feet hurt so bad. 

 

It's a fantastic number and despite how Kelly may have felt about Reynolds (I've read contrasting accounts about how he felt when Reynolds was cast), I think she did a great job and was perfect for the role.  The role of Kathy needed a young ingenue.  It wouldn't have made sense to have a 30 something experienced actress portraying the young starlet.  It's a real testament to Reynolds' talent that she was able to learn as much as she did and be able to keep up with professional dancers like Gene Kelly and Donald O'Connor. 

 

If I were a young actress, new to the scene, I think I'd be petrified if I found out that I was going to have to dance alongside two talented dancers like Kelly and O'Connor. 

 

My husband finds her completely adorable in this film and I think that it's one of the main reasons he'll watch "Singin' in the Rain" with me over and over.  I agree with him.  She's adorable and utterly charming in this film.  I really love her "All I Do is Dream of You" number that she does at the beginning of the film.

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I love the story (apocryphal or not) about Fred Astaire coming upon a crying Debbie Reynold in a rehearsal hall when she was trying to learn the routines for Singin' In The Rain. Though sympathetic, he told her that becoming a good dancer took a lot of work. This was one of those times when the powers that be were absolutely right -  DR might have been a contract player but she was perfect for the part. On another note, I've never read anything about how Donald O'Connor responded to working with Gene Kelly.  Rumor hath that Kelly, while talented, had an incredible ego, making him difficult to work with.  Wonder how Donald O'Connor felt about working with him???

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I love the story (apocryphal or not) about Fred Astaire coming upon a crying Debbie Reynold in a rehearsal hall when she was trying to learn the routines for Singin' In The Rain. Though sympathetic, he told her that becoming a good dancer took a lot of work. This was one of those times when the powers that be were absolutely right -  DR might have been a contract player but she was perfect for the part. On another note, I've never read anything about how Donald O'Connor responded to working with Gene Kelly.  Rumor hath that Kelly, while talented, had an incredible ego, making him difficult to work with.  Wonder how Donald O'Connor felt about working with him???

I also love the story about Astaire.  I don't know if it's true or not, but it makes a fun story.  If Gene Kelly is being a grump, who could possibly be a better backup teacher than Astaire? I really like Fred Astaire.  From every movie I've seen him in and interviews I've seen him in, he seems like he was a very sweet humble guy.  While I don't think Fred Astaire is ugly, I've never found him attractive.  Gene Kelly though, I always thought was kind of hot even though he typically played hammy characters (which I've found many people online who found his hamminess a turn off), it doesn't bother me.  He has a great smile which I find endearing.

 

From all accounts I've read, Gene Kelly was a taskmaster and wanted everything done just right.  He would force people to do things over and over.  He was a perfectionist.  Apparently, after they completed the "Good Mornin" number, Gene, while satisfied with Debbie's dancing, wasn't satisfied with her taps.  He re-recorded her taps and his own taps in the sound booth.  I could see how his perfectionism could make him hard to work with, but I've also read that he was just as hard on himself as he was on everybody else.  If your name is going to be on something, I can see why you'd want it to be good.  Fred Astaire was a perfectionist too, but he was more a perfectionist with himself and the props.  Astaire didn't have as much an ego (if any?).

 

Debbie Reynolds, in all interviews I've seen her in where she discusses her experience making Singin' With the Rain, despite how hard Kelly was on her during filming, she never says anything but nice things about him.  She says that while he was tough, she learned a lot from him and was grateful. 

 

As for O'Connor, the only thing that I've read was that while he found Gene Kelly very tough on the set, he appreciated his brilliance and patience with those trying to learn what Kelly wanted them to do. 

 

Even if Kelly was a bit of a tyrant on set, it definitely paid off.

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The Good Morning sequence is absolutely delightful. What I always marvel at when watching a number like that, so perfectly executed and joyful, is how effortless the players make it look. Of course we all know how much time and hard work goes into such a number ( and obviously not just Good Morning,)  but the final outcome is so lovely, all that effort pays off, and we the audience only see the great dancing and singing - all that work has created a little piece of musical heaven.

 

Bonus : what makes this scene even more of a treat is you know that another fantastic song and dance number is coming up immediately afterwards, the centrepiece of the film, Gene Kelly's deservedly famous performance of Singin' in the Rain.

 

Both musical sequences achieve the kind of transcendence some films achieve every now and then, where nothing matters, during the 10 minutes or so you're watching it, but the felicitious union of music and dance. All that long hard work and what we see is the joyful result.

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...Bonus : what makes this scene even more of a treat is you know that another fantastic song and dance number is coming up immediately afterwards, the centrepiece of the film, Gene deservedly famous performance of Singin' in the Rain.

 

Absolutely delightful, both musical sequences achieve the kind of transcendence some films achieve every now and then, where nothing matters, during the 10 minutes or so you're watching it, but the felicitious union of music and dance. All that long hard work and what we see is the joyful result.

 

I'll go ya one better here, MissW. I think EVERY musical scene in this film is a treat, even including the one that doesn't feature Kelly, O'Connor or Reynolds...the purposely campy send-up of a Busby Berkeley production, "Beautiful Girl" number.

 

(...yep, as those two Movie Camp guys said tonight in their wraparound, this movie is perfect)

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I love almost all the numbers in this film, except for the montage of early talkie musical songs... that is the part of the film where I usually go to the bathroom or get a snack.  I understand why it's in the film, it's just not my favorite part.

 

My favorite number is "The Broadway Melody." I love the beginning with Gene Kelly in his yellow vest trying to impress the agents with his "Gotta dance!" I love when he dances with Cyd Charisse who is wearing that fantastic green flapper dress.  I absolutely love the jazz music that is played and how sexy that routine is.  The best part of that routine is when Cyd removes Gene's glasses and then when Gene lifts her with one arm! I also love the second half of the routine where Cyd has the white dress on with the huge veil.  Fantastic.  

 

Another favorite number is probably Donald O'Connor's "Make 'Em Laugh" dance.  I don't know how anyone could watch that performance and not feel instantly happier.  What a fun moment in film.

 

I also love the "Moses Supposes" number with Gene and Donald.  Such a great routine and so fun.  When I see this number and the "Make 'Em Laugh" song, it always reinforces to me how much talent is lacking in Hollywood these days.  I cannot imagine any cast of actors today who would be able to carry off these performances with even a tenth of the skill and charm that is evident in this film.

 

Another favorite is when Gene is recounting his journey to Hollywood, and he and Donald perform the "Fit as a Fiddle" number.  I love their suits and the amount of strength they'd have to have in their legs to be able to perform that number is just amazing. 

 

I could just go on and on with my favorite numbers.  I love all of them.  My least favorite aside from the montage scene I talked about is probably the "You Were Meant For Me" number, and that's only because there's no dancing in it.  It is an important song to have in the plot to establish the relationship between Debbie and Gene, so I'm definitely glad it is in the film.

 

 

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Yes, it's one great movie, all right.

We gotta mention the very talented and funny Jean Hagen, whose unforgettable characterization of Lina Lamont adds so much to the film, you can't imagine Singin' in the Rain without her. Lina's selfishness is key to the story.

 

One of my very favourite lines of hers', uttered in that hilariously screechy voice,

"Ya think I'm DUMB or somethin' ? ! "

 

Every now and then , when the occasion seems to require it, I say that, screechy voice and all.

 

(Of course in real life Jean had a lovely voice.)

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Yes, it's one great movie, all right.

We gotta mention the very talented and funny Jean Hagen, whose unforgettable characterization of Lina Lamont adds so much to the film, you can't imagine Singin' in the Rain without her. Lina's selfishness is key to the story.

 

One of my very favourite lines of hers', uttered in that hilariously screechy voice,

"Ya think I'm DUMB or somethin' ? ! "

 

Every now and then , when the occasion seems to require it, I say that, screechy voice and all.

 

(Of course in real life Jean had a lovely voice.)

Agreed. Her voice is what makes it and is perfectly in line with what happened to some talkie actors who were elegant and charming on screen but had a horrible voice.

 

I love her diction classes. "...an' I can't stan' it!"

 

I also love: "I have more money than Calvin Coolidge. Put together!"

 

Apparently they originally wanted Judy Holliday, but with her Oscar win and success with "Born Yesterday," it was thought she was too big a star to accept the part--paving the way for Jean Hagen.

 

My one complaint about this film is the lack of consistency with Debbie Reynolds' singing voice. She sings most of the songs with her real voice. Then when she's dubbing Jean Hagen, she's lip syncing to Hagen's actual voice, then at the end, during the reprise of "You Were Meant For Me," she had a completely different voice.

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Yes, it's one great movie, all right.

We gotta mention the very talented and funny Jean Hagen, whose unforgettable characterization of Lina Lamont adds so much to the film, you can't imagine Singin' in the Rain without her. Lina's selfishness is key to the story.

 

One of my very favourite lines of hers', uttered in that hilariously screechy voice,

"Ya think I'm DUMB or somethin' ? ! "

 

Every now and then , when the occasion seems to require it, I say that, screechy voice and all.

 

(Of course in real life Jean had a lovely voice.)

 

THIS "linguist''s (wink, wink) favorite line of Hagen's and one which I myself will say when the occasion requires it is..."I cain't stands 'im!"

 

And yes MissW, I say it out loud in that very same high-pitched nasally way she says it.

 

(...yep, kind'a like how I always lower my voice and add 'H"s after all the "S"s whenever I do my SEAN CONNERY IMPRESSION!!!!)

 

LOL

 

;)

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The Good Morning sequence is absolutely delightful. What I always marvel at when watching a number like that, so perfectly executed and joyful, is how effortless the players make it look. Of course we all know how much time and hard work goes into such a number ( and obviously not just Good Morning,)  but the final outcome is so lovely, all that effort pays off, and we the audience only see the great dancing and singing - all that work has created a little piece of musical heaven.

 

Bonus : what makes this scene even more of a treat is you know that another fantastic song and dance number is coming up immediately afterwards, the centrepiece of the film, Gene Kelly's deservedly famous performance of Singin' in the Rain.

 

Both musical sequences achieve the kind of transcendence some films achieve every now and then, where nothing matters, during the 10 minutes or so you're watching it, but the felicitious union of music and dance. All that long hard work and what we see is the joyful result.

I think that  the "Good Morning" sequence is absolute crapola. It would fit right in with a lot of Rodgers & Hammerstein stuff.........Boy, that felt good.

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I think that  the "Good Morning" sequence is absolute crapola. It would fit right in with a lot of Rodgers & Hammerstein stuff.........Boy, that felt good.

 

Funny - i absolutely love "Good Morming" - and love that it could fit right in with the great Rodgers and Hammerstein stuff. And, yes, that DID feel good!

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Funny - i absolutely love "Good Morming" - and love that it could fit right in with the great Rodgers and Hammerstein stuff. And, yes, that DID feel good!

I myself am not big on saying "Good Morning" to people, so I guess it follows. I, do, though, like the Rascals' "Beautiful Morning". One of their best.

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Speedracer has hit on something that I've always wondered.  Why did they dub another voice for Debbie Reynolds in some songs, and then have her do her own singing in others?  That just does not make any sense at all.  Debbie has a very nice singing voice.  I guess we'll never know.

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Apparently they originally wanted Judy Holliday, but with her Oscar win and success with "Born Yesterday," it was thought she was too big a star to accept the part--paving the way for Jean Hagen.

 

My one complaint about this film is the lack of consistency with Debbie Reynolds' singing voice. She sings most of the songs with her real voice. Then when she's dubbing Jean Hagen, she's lip syncing to Hagen's actual voice, then at the end, during the reprise of "You Were Meant For Me," she had a completely different voice.

Only in Hollywood would they think that filmgoers wouldn't notice that Kathy Selden's speaking voice suddenly morphs into something totally different (way more sophisticated and a completely different accent) when she is dubbing Lina's dialogue.  Personally, I'm thrilled they couldn't get Judy Holliday (not a fan.) I think they got the far better actress in Jean Hagen who created a character that is a classic.

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I was surprised not too long ago when I finally found out that the movie is younger than I am!

 

When I was much younger and they'd show clips from it(usually Kelly dancing in that Hollywood "rainfall"), and probably because at THAT time, it was on my family's B&W Philco, I thought the movie was WAY older than me!

 

But, it's an OK movie for me.  I'll not chime in on the "Good Morning" sequence, as I usually, like a lot of others, live for the "Make 'Em Laugh" sequence.  O'Connor was just fantastic!

 

 

Sepiatone

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This seems to be turning into a feelgood thread, which is not all bad. Incidentally, good afternoon to you.

 

Sorry DGF, but I THINK you're now obliged to send a royalty check to JakeHolman.

 

(...sorry, I don't have his address, but I DO believe he resides somewhere in The Heartland!!!)

 

LOL

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The Good Morning sequence is absolutely delightful. What I always marvel at when watching a number like that, so perfectly executed and joyful, is how effortless the players make it look. Of course we all know how much time and hard work goes into such a number ( and obviously not just Good Morning,)  but the final outcome is so lovely, all that effort pays off, and we the audience only see the great dancing and singing - all that work has created a little piece of musical heaven.

 

Bonus : what makes this scene even more of a treat is you know that another fantastic song and dance number is coming up immediately afterwards, the centrepiece of the film, Gene Kelly's deservedly famous performance of Singin' in the Rain.

 

Both musical sequences achieve the kind of transcendence some films achieve every now and then, where nothing matters, during the 10 minutes or so you're watching it, but the felicitious union of music and dance. All that long hard work and what we see is the joyful result.

I DO agree that the "Singin' in the Rain" sequence is great. The rest of the sequences, IMHO, are far inferior to those in many other musical films. THE BANDWAGON, released the next year, has IMHO, MANY sequences that equal or surpass the "Singin' in the Rain" sequence.

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.....But, it's an OK movie for me.  I'll not chime in on the "Good Morning" sequence, as I usually, like a lot of others, live for the "Make 'Em Laugh" sequence.  O'Connor was just fantastic!

 

I hope I didn't somehow give the impression that "Good Morning" is my favourite number in the film. I do like it, but I love every song and dance sequence in the entire move, a few maybe even more than "G.M."   

 

speedracer sort of itemized most of the numbers in SITR, and as she said, they're all great. Including, of course, "Make 'Em Laugh".

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I DO agree that the "Singin' in the Rain" sequence is great. The rest of the sequences, IMHO, are far inferior to those in many other musical films. THE BANDWAGON, released the next year, has IMHO, MANY sequences that equal or surpass the "Singin' in the Rain" sequence.

 

Ah HA! So THAT explains why I hear you're so meticulous about always keeping a..ahem..shine on your shoes, EH?!

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I hope I didn't somehow give the impression that "Good Morning" is my favourite number in the film. I do like it, but I love every song and dance sequence in the entire move, a few maybe even more than "G.M."   

 

speedracer sort of itemized most of the numbers in SITR, and as she said, they're all great. Including, of course, "Make 'Em Laugh".

My top 5 musical films of the '50s (not in order)

 

THE BANDWAGON

GIGI

FUNNY FACE

IT'S ALWAYS FAIR WEATHER

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS

 

SINGIN' IN THE RAIN is next. It would be higher, were it not for the musical sequences.

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I DO agree that the "Singin' in the Rain" sequence is great. The rest of the sequences, IMHO, are far inferior to those in many other musical films. THE BANDWAGON, released the next year, has IMHO, MANY sequences that equal or surpass the "Singin' in the Rain" sequence.

 

I enjoy The Bandwagon too. However, as I've said many many times on theads about musicals, a musical is only as good as its music

And the music- the songs - in SITR are clearly better - stronger, catchier, more memorable - than the songs in The Bandwagon.

 

The best song in the latter film is Dancing in the Dark.

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I enjoy The Bandwagon too. However, as I've said many many times on theads about musicals, a musical is only as good as its music

And the music- the songs - in SITR are clearly better - stronger, catchier, more memorable - than the songs in The Bandwagon.

 

The best song in the latter film is Dancing in the Dark.

The "That's Entertainment" song is sheer brilliance. So is "I'll Go My Way, by Myself".

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