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Movie Soundtracks


CaveGirl
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Having seen the recent TCM listing for the great Terence Malick film "Badlands", made me remember how fab its soundtrack was. Any film using music from Carl Orff and themes from Erik Satie like "Trois Pieces en Forme de Poire" is okay by me. Such dense musicality added to the story based on the Charles Starkweather and Caril Fugate murder spree, which was on point even with a bit of artistic license utilized by Malick. Starkweather, an avowed James Dean imitator and general miscreant was executed not long after being captured but Fugate was incarcerated for quite a few years before being released back into the public. Many believed she was the innocent victim of Charley and had been kidnapped, but a prison shrink said her behaviour as a model prisoner,might belie this faith in her innocence as it indicated the sheeplike mentality which inculcated her adoration and support to Starkweather as he choose his victims, including her own mother. Just which one was the ringleader and which the follower owes much to the folie a deux syndrome theory but let's not go there.

 

Another film with an amazing soundtrack is "A Clockwork Orange". It ranks with the finest on vinyl in my opinion, but what others are your faves?

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I have always enjoyed listening for soundtracks to memorable films.  Even 3 or 4 minutes of musical footage can be inherent to increasing the appeal of a film.  One case in point is  "The Mystery of Marie Roget",  a fine 40's film noir which was recently

restored on DVD.  In a waltz scene toward the beginning of the film there is a lovely musical sequence I have heard in other films.  But a strange thing occurred when I viewed the restored version a day or so ago. 

 

This version is missing most of the 3 or 4 minutes of the music.  To see if I was right, I put on my old DVD copy (transferred to DVD several years ago from VHS) and played the film.  The music is there in the background for 2 or 3 minutes while the dancers whirl around the ballroom.  When Marie steps outside, the lovely music continues for a moment or so.  But it  is mostly missing in the restored print! Wonder how that happened.  I have a friend who listens for music in films especially and thinks the film restoration people only work with what they are given!  I just wondered.  The restored copy is lovely like a Criterion, however.  THIS lovely music can also be heard for a few moments in the stylish 40's horror film, Son of Dracula.  I used to re-wind the VHS tape to find it again and again.  

 

A Clockwork Orange did have a great soundtrack.  Haven't seen it a long time.   .....  Sometimes a lovely song is memorable to a film.  The Loretta Young film '51  "Half Angel" features beautiful footage - of the lovely actress gowned in a gorgeous green sequined dress and singing beautifully, a song called "Castles in the Sand" to the enthralled Joseph Cotten. The words are poignant and touching. 

 

THe Barretts of Wimpole Street '34 features a beautiful song that Elizabeth Barrett Browning had composed and sung to her family (when her father was not around).  We see the lovely and talented Norma Shearer seated at the piano singing "Wilt Thou Have My Heart?"  Charles Laughton was outstanding in this film as the tyrannical (widower) Mr. Barrett who would not allow his children to see members of the opposite sex or to marry!  When their father is out ot town the many brothers and sisters entertain themselves by singing songs and playing charades. 

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Film scores are my favorite music.  My love for them began when I saw the film NORTH BY NORTHWEST, during its original theatrical release, then BEN-HUR, a few months later.  As if those scores reached out from the screen and grabbed me!  I've been obsessed with film scores, ever since.  I am not such a fan of films that use classical music or pop tunes for their scores.  In fact, I particularly hate films that are padded with pop tunes, in place of an original, orchestral score.    NBNW remains in my top 10 all-time favorite scores.  My favorite film score is Pino Donaggio's score to Brian De Palma's DRESSED TO KILL.

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In all honesty, I never really paid much attention to a film's musical soundtrack unless the movie WAS a musical, or there was something outstanding about who was in it(like "A Hard Day's Night" and "Help!" for instance).

 

It wasn't until my mid seventies toking days that me and some friends would turn on the late show(old horror films worked great) and sit in the next room and pay more attention to the music score than the dialogue.  THEN is when I paid them more mind.

 

A few of my favorites:

 

THAT THING YOU DO( not sure of all the people involved, but many tunes done in perfect mid '60's vibe!)

 

OCEAN'S ELEVEN(2001)  David Holmes' classy and snappy jazz score was FAR too overlooked.  Best film score of that year!

 

ARLINGTON AVENUE--one of John Williams' best

 

IMMORTAL BELOVED--Can't really diss BEETHOVEN  which is also why I'll go with your choice of :

 

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE--fine synthesized treatment of Beethoven et al , and back when WENDY CARLOS was still WALTER!

 

O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU?--lot of great stuff in there. 

 

PORTRAIT OF JENNIE--if you like Debussy, you'll love this score! 

 

 

Sepiatone

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Film scores are my favorite music.  My love for them began when I saw the film NORTH BY NORTHWEST, during its original theatrical release, then BEN-HUR, a few months later.  As if those scores reached out from the screen and grabbed me!  I've been obsessed with film scores, ever since.  I am not such a fan of films that use classical music or pop tunes for their scores.  In fact, I particularly hate films that are padded with pop tunes, in place of an original, orchestral score.    NBNW remains in my top 10 all-time favorite scores.  My favorite film score is Pino Donaggio's score to Brian De Palma's DRESSED TO KILL.

would you have any good cuts of ave caesar from quo vadis? :lol:

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In all honesty, I never really paid much attention to a film's musical soundtrack unless the movie WAS a musical, or there was something outstanding about who was in it(like "A Hard Day's Night" and "Help!" for instance).

 

It wasn't until my mid seventies toking days that me and some friends would turn on the late show(old horror films worked great) and sit in the next room and pay more attention to the music score than the dialogue.  THEN is when I paid them more mind.

 

A few of my favorites:

 

THAT THING YOU DO( not sure of all the people involved, but many tunes done in perfect mid '60's vibe!)

 

OCEAN'S ELEVEN(2001)  David Holmes' classy and snappy jazz score was FAR too overlooked.  Best film score of that year!

 

ARLINGTON AVENUE--one of John Williams' best

 

IMMORTAL BELOVED--Can't really diss BEETHOVEN  which is also why I'll go with your choice of :

 

A CLOCKWORK ORANGE--fine synthesized treatment of Beethoven et al , and back when WENDY CARLOS was still WALTER!

 

O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU?--lot of great stuff in there. 

 

PORTRAIT OF JENNIE--if you like Debussy, you'll love this score! 

 

 

Sepiatone

I think Williams best score is jaws. got 'em an oscar in '75. so many great scores to his credit like the towering inferno. :)

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I think Williams best score is jaws. got 'em an oscar in '75. so many great scores to his credit like the towering inferno. :)

'EM?  I thought we were talking about only ONE person here!  ;)

 

And anyway, a score winning an Oscar isn't indicative of any quality as a GRAMMY is to popular music.

 

And, His score for THE COWBOYS was pretty good, too.

 

 

 

Sepiatone

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That score exists, but in poor quality.  There is this recording that you can convert to an mp3

 

 

Rozsa released an vinyl LP back in the late 1970s of some new music he conductef from his ben-hur and quo vadis scores.

the cut of ave caesar from that album is what I have been looking for so not any ol' rendition of ave caesar will due for me.

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If you are referring to Miklos Rozsa Conducts His Epic Film Scores, that is also available on Youtube, where you can convert to MP3

thank you so much,  johnm001, been looking for that particular rendition for a long time. I think it is the most pulse-pounding relentless version of ave caesar anyone's ever gonna find.

:)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGiP2OFSNa0

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But in the sense of a "soundtrack album" for a movie the term refers to songs used in the movie.

Yes, you are absolutely right.  I thought about that afterward.

That comes from the old lp sections that were labeled 'Movie Soundtracks.'  And in the vinyl days the movie soundtrack album usually referred to the score of the film.  I still have a few kicking around.

So, I guess the answer is that a movie soundtrack is all of those things.   The complete soundtrack: dialogue, music and sound effects; or the movie's score; or the movie's songs.

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There is a difference between a movie score and a movie soundtrack.

 

A soundtrack usually refers to songs (usually pop songs) that are heard during a movie (often in the background).

Actually, the original term "soundtrack" meant the music and/or songs from a movie or even TV shows eventually.  This was in the days of LP vinyl as someone mentioned.  May have been a misnomer, but that's what they were called.  Still have lots of LP 'soundtracks," as well as CD's.

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Actually, the original term "soundtrack" meant the music and/or songs from a movie or even TV shows eventually.  This was in the days of LP vinyl as someone mentioned.  May have been a misnomer, but that's what they were called.  Still have lots of LP 'soundtracks," as well as CD's.

In the professional film sound business itself, the 'soundtrack' was a three track recording: music, dialogue and effects.

People used the same term for slightly different things.

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Actually, the original term "soundtrack" meant the music and/or songs from a movie or even TV shows eventually.  This was in the days of LP vinyl as someone mentioned.  May have been a misnomer, but that's what they were called.  Still have lots of LP 'soundtracks," as well as CD's.

 

Yes, over the years it appears the use of the term "movie soundtrack" by the record labels changed to refer to an album of songs from the movie.

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Yes, over the years it appears the use of the term "movie soundtrack" by the record labels changed to refer to an album of songs from the movie.

They still use the term "Original Soundtrack Recording" to mean the film's score, not just songs.  Most films don't have songs, they have orchestral scores.  Although, most aren't what they once were, that's for sure.

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