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The Man Who Came To Dinner


JoeMastro
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Let me preface my comment by saying that I absolutely love classic movies and TCM.  My father got me interested in them when I was growing up (in the 50's).  Many fond memories of watching "The Early Show", "The Late Show", "Million Dollar Movie"...and for the last 21 years "Turner Classic Movies".  But there are some movies that when I watch as an adult, I see things that I didn't grasp as a youngster. 

 

Monty Woolley falls and breaks/fractures his hip so is forced to stay at someone's home until he is well thereby wreaking havoc on everyone...the premise of the movie.  As I watched this last night, I remember thinking " why didn't they call an ambulance and take him to a hospital?"  I mean was healthcare so different in 1942 that no one even thought or suggested it?  I love this movie and have seen it before, but it never dawned on me until yesterday that the whole premise of having an injured person be treated with home care instead of a hospital stay seemed just a bit absurd.  Well, as I said, maybe not so far fetched for 1942.

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Let me preface my comment by saying that I absolutely love classic movies and TCM.  My father got me interested in them when I was growing up (in the 50's).  Many fond memories of watching "The Early Show", "The Late Show", "Million Dollar Movie"...and for the last 21 years "Turner Classic Movies".  But there are some movies that when I watch as an adult, I see things that I didn't grasp as a youngster. 

 

Monty Woolley falls and breaks/fractures his hip so is forced to stay at someone's home until he is well thereby wreaking havoc on everyone...the premise of the movie.  As I watched this last night, I remember thinking " why didn't they call an ambulance and take him to a hospital?"  I mean was healthcare so different in 1942 that no one even thought or suggested it?  I love this movie and have seen it before, but it never dawned on me until yesterday that the whole premise of having an injured person be treated with home care instead of a hospital stay seemed just a bit absurd.  Well, as I said, maybe not so far fetched for 1942.

Whiteside had no health insurance.

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Some might try to rationalize it by saying, "Maybe there WAS no hospital nearby."  or, "That's just the way they DID things back then."  You've seen it many times in other movies and on some TV shows.  For instance....

 

How many times when YOU were a kid, did your Mom ever have a doctor come to your house just to tell her you have a cold?

 

But, I think in Monty's case, it was just a device for the story.  Perhaps rationalized by some that the people who own the house felt responsible for his injury( he DID fall at THEIR place, after all) and that having him recuperate at their house(and at their inconveinience) was fair compensation. 

 

In real life, I sincerely doubt such a situation would have transpired.  But, we're duscussing MOVIES here, so "real life" is not really a consideration.  :)

 

 

Sepiatone

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If they had taken Monty to a hospital we would have missed out on a great story !!

 

I mean; 'How Can You Be In Two Places At Once When Your Not Anywhere At All?'

 

Should I Stay Or Should I Go?

 

or more to the point....

 

"Did you ever have the feeling that you wanted to go, and then you had the feeling that you wanted to stay ?!?"

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Some might try to rationalize it by saying, "Maybe there WAS no hospital nearby."  or, "That's just the way they DID things back then."  You've seen it many times in other movies and on some TV shows.  For instance....

 

How many times when YOU were a kid, did your Mom ever have a doctor come to your house just to tell her you have a cold?

 

But, I think in Monty's case, it was just a device for the story.  Perhaps rationalized by some that the people who own the house felt responsible for his injury( he DID fall at THEIR place, after all) and that having him recuperate at their house(and at their inconveinience) was fair compensation. 

 

In real life, I sincerely doubt such a situation would have transpired.  But, we're duscussing MOVIES here, so "real life" is not really a consideration.  :)

 

 

Sepiatone

"A device for the story" -- exactly. Also known as "willing suspension of disbelief."

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If they had taken Monty to a hospital we would have missed out on a great story !!

 

I mean; 'How Can You Be In Two Places At Once When Your Not Anywhere At All?'

 

Should I Stay Or Should I Go?

 

or more to the point....

 

"Did you ever have the feeling that you wanted to go, and then you had the feeling that you wanted to stay ?!?"

Hah!

 

Sounds like you're "Just In Time To Be Too Late". 

 

BTW---loved the Firesign referrence  :D

 

 

Sepiatone

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I'm sure Sheridan would've refused to go to any hick hospital and demanded instead to stay at the comfy home of his wealthy host and hostess (after all, it was "all thei fault" for having icy steps)...it's also possible the doctor said he shouldn't be moved and was taken quite literally.

 

let's also not forget the ulterior motives of the lady of the house (Billie Burke) jumping at the social perks of allowing Sheridan Whiteside to recover at HER home and the Doctor having a captive audience for his novel.

 

In-Home health care apparently used to be a much bigger thing apparently. It REALLY p****s me off to see Jimmy Stewart's photographer-with-a-broken-leg in REAR WINDOW having his insurance company PROVIDE HIM WITH AN ALL-DAY PRIVATE NURSE WHO MASSAGES HIM AND COOKS AND CLEANS.

 

Was he a former member of Congress or something?

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I'm sure Sheridan would've refused to go to any hick hospital and demanded instead to stay at the comfy home of his wealthy host and hostess (after all, it was "all thei fault" for having icy steps)...it's also possible the doctor said he shouldn't be moved and was taken quite literally.

 

let's also not forget the ulterior motives of the lady of the house (Billie Burke) jumping at the social perks of allowing Sheridan Whiteside to recover at HER home and the Doctor having a captive audience for his novel.

 

In-Home health care apparently used to be a much bigger thing apparently. It REALLY p****s me off to see Jimmy Stewart's photographer-with-a-broken-leg in REAR WINDOW having his insurance company PROVIDE HIM WITH AN ALL-DAY PRIVATE NURSE WHO MASSAGES HIM AND COOKS AND CLEANS.

 

Was he a former member of Congress or something?

 

Jimmy Stewart had FDRCare. ;)

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Sheridan staying at the Stanleys doesn't seem too far fetched to me because of his character. Meaning, to me, Sherry seems vindictive enough that even if they recommended he go to a hospital he might choose to stay in that place just to make the Stanleys "suffer as much as he did". Even though he hates is, he's willing to make that sacrifice to teach them a lesson!!!

(LornaHansonForbes kinda said this, just expounding)

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