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Pet Peeve


cmovieviewer
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I know I am completely spoiled by TCM, but for foreign films that have been released in multiple languages, I wish there was some way for TCM to denote in the schedule which version of the film they are planning to show.  Today for example, it looks like Journey to Italy was shown again with Italian dubbing and English subtitles, while Europa '51 was shown with English audio instead of Italian (shouldn't this version be referred to as Europe '51 ?).  In the past there was similar confusion over the silent vs. sound version of Hitchcock's Blackmail (the infamous showing where Ben introduced the rare silent version, only to be followed by another airing of the sound version).

 

I guess the web schedule is likely to be mostly automated these days, but it sure would be nice if such details could be captured somewhere.

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I know I am completely spoiled by TCM, but for foreign films that have been released in multiple languages, I wish there was some way for TCM to denote in the schedule which version of the film they are planning to show.  Today for example, it looks like Journey to Italy was shown again with Italian dubbing and English subtitles, while Europa '51 was shown with English audio instead of Italian (shouldn't this version be referred to as Europe '51 ?).  In the past there was similar confusion over the silent vs. sound version of Hitchcock's Blackmail (the infamous showing where Ben introduced the rare silent version, only to be followed by another airing of the sound version).

 

I guess the web schedule is likely to be mostly automated these days, but it sure would be nice if such details could be captured somewhere.

 

Very good point.  I remember being fired up to see a particular Brigitte Bardot movie, only to discover that it was dubbed into English.  I tried to watch it for about ten minutes and then shut it off in disgust.  When there is more than one version of a film out there, it shouldn't be that hard for TCM simply to indicate which one it is.

 

Of course the worst instance of this didn't involve a foreign film, but Charlie Chaplin's The Gold Rush.  It's now been shown several times in the original silent version, but prior to about a year and a half ago, we'd routinely see that excruciating "enhanced" 1942 version being passed off as the original, without any sort of a warning.  They should round up every copy of that 1942 atrocity and show them to prisoners in Guantanamo in order to get them to talk.  If that wouldn't work, nothing will.

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I have the same complaint about the Now Playing Guide.  They have all kind of symbols and notes, to include when it is a silent movie.  Why not indicate when it is a foreign language?

Right now, I assume if all actors are French, German, Japanese, Italian, etc., it is in a foreign language with subtitles.

It is often hard to read the subtitles and watch the movie at the same time because they are speaking so fast.

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I'm a bit on the fence for this one.

 

I don't mind sometimes, if a foreign film is dubbed.  For me, it all depends on the voices.  Sometimes, in spite of good intentions, some dub jobs wind up sounding as  funny as Woddy Allen's "What's Up, Tiger Lily?".

 

Then again, Not ever having taken the Evelyn Wood course, READING the movie sometimes makes SEEING all of it difficult.  Depending on the amount of dialogue the film has to begin with, that subtitleing it takes a lot of attention away from what's being shown on the screen.

 

But, yeah.  It really shouldn't be hard for TCM to indicate, either in IT'S guide, or even when it's broadcast is announced, just WHICH version they're going to show.  But sometimes, I've noticed other things going on(and wrong) at TCM to the point I believe they've shown TOO MANY Marx Brothers movies, and it's rubbed off!

 

 

 

Sepiatone

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I have the same complaint about the Now Playing Guide.  They have all kind of symbols and notes, to include when it is a silent movie.  Why not indicate when it is a foreign language?

Right now, I assume if all actors are French, German, Japanese, Italian, etc., it is in a foreign language with subtitles.

It is often hard to read the subtitles and watch the movie at the same time because they are speaking so fast.

 

While I only want to watch foreign language films WITH subtitles, I think your request is more than reasonable.

 

I'd also like for the Now Playing guide to have a list of all the month's premieres at the front of the magazine.  It would make choosing each month's movies to watch a lot easier.

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I don't mind sometimes, if a foreign film is dubbed.  

The only two dubbing jobs which I actually prefer to the originals are Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, where the oft-chanted line "She's got the belly" sounds so much better in English; and the apparently lost dubbed version of The Black Pit of Dr. M. a marvel of Mexican horror to which the English dubbing adds quite a lot: "Yes it's me. I came back in Elmer's body!"

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The only two dubbing jobs which I actually prefer to the originals are Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow, where the oft-chanted line "She's got the belly" sounds so much better in English; and the apparently lost dubbed version of The Black Pit of Dr. M. a marvel of Mexican horror to which the English dubbing adds quite a lot: "Yes it's me. I came back in Elmer's body!"

I watched the English-dubbed version of The Black Pit of Dr. M when I was a kiddie space cadet on WPIX Channel 11's Chiller Theatre.

where were all today's cinema preservers back then?

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