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slaytonf

Haywire over Hayward.

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Stage right and stage left from the actor's perspective.

 

Camera right and camera left are from the camera's perspective (so it would be the reverse direction for the movie actors). 

 

 

Thank you! Always wondered about that.

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While.Susan wasn't frumpy, James Mason most certainly was. But I don't think frumpiness was a criteria, just a long-married couple, with a new babe inspiring the 16 year itch.

 

I always thought that more expert.comedy players would've made the difference. Say, Cary Grant and Colbert, although she was no longer doing films. Or maybe Deborah Kerr (now she Could play frumpy), or Linda Darnell, who was a little young (around 36), but who was looking a little frumpy and could play comedy. Or even Doris Day, but she was now in her v irgin phase, and probably would not have wanted to play the mother of two teenagers.

 

 

What happened to the teenagers? I missed that part.

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What happened to the teenagers? I missed that part.

There's just a line or two of dialogue......a boy and a girl, ages 14 and 15, both away at boarding school. Susan tells Julie soon afrer she arrives, and I think there are.framed.photos in the living room.

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Hmmm.

 

I just found the whole thing static and stagey and I can't recall a single laugh or line of funny dialogue. The film presents us with this strange, comedic scenario, but then doesn't do or say or build anything on it that is funny in any way.

 

Newmar was terrific though, it's a shame her film career never took off. She was so convincingly Swedish and didn't even look like herself, if not for her height, I wouldn't have even guessed it was her.

 

I guess I was in a really forgiving mood last night.    NO,  what really did it was Newmar;  when she wasn't on screen I quickly started to lose interest but keep with it waiting for her return and I was rewarded.   Either by that pants suit outfit,  the sunbathing scene,  or that sheer gown (yea,  what she called an appropriate dress for a lecture!).     Unlike that lame husband I'm 100% willing to admit I'm guilty as charged.

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Hibi, on 25 Sept. 2015 -  10:27 A.M said "something was lost in translation..."

 

That's one way of putting it.  The play was no great shakes to begin with, but was a Lot bawdier on Broadway--& The Code eliminated most of the good stuff.

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There's just a line or two of dialogue......a boy and a girl, ages 14 and 15, both away at boarding school. Susan tells Julie soon afrer she arrives, and I think there are.framed.photos in the living room.

 

 

OH, ok. Thanks. I missed part of the middle as I was watching picture in picture when it was on......I didnt recall seeing any kids.

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Hibi, on 25 Sept. 2015 -  10:27 A.M said "something was lost in translation..."

 

That's one way of putting it.  The play was no great shakes to begin with, but was a Lot bawdier on Broadway--& The Code eliminated most of the good stuff.

 

 

Yeah, I was wondering if it was sanitized for the screen. Seemed really tame even for its time.........

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What.did people think about the other films on the last night of the Susan Hayward SOTM, besides THE MARRIAGE-GO-ROUND and VALLEY OF THE DOLLS?

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What.did people think about the other films on the last night of the Susan Hayward SOTM, besides THE MARRIAGE-GO-ROUND and VALLEY OF THE DOLLS?

Just got back. Ben soured me on THE MARRIAGE-GO-ROUND before it started, and, ten minutes into the film, I decided that the public and critics were right. Click.

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OK:

 

Back Street-- (1961)--Susan wears gorgeous clothes, jewels, furs--script lets her down, but she's good anyway.

 

Stolen Hours--(1963)--Not as good as Bette Davis' Dark Victory (1939), which it's the remake of.

 

The Honey Pot--(1967)--Overlong comedy, Susan is good--light comic touch, but strained looking ( her husband died during filming).

 

These films were on the next morning:

 

Where Love Has Gone--(1964)--Bette Davis, Susan, Joey Heatherton, horrible dialogue & a Dreadful portrait of Bette. The portrait gets it.  Camp classic.

 

I Thank A Fool--(1962)--put me to sleep--Dean Martin woke me up early in--

 

Ada (1961)--Susan is good, & situation is no longer as preposterous (call girl weds politician) as it was--Susan is very good, even if script defies/d plausibility.

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What.did people think about the other films on the last night of the Susan Hayward SOTM, besides THE MARRIAGE-GO-ROUND and VALLEY OF THE DOLLS?

 

Back Street had the usual impossibly saccharine ending  that Hollywood films of that era were forced to be saddled with, but beyond that and the lavish production values, what stood out for me after thinking about it was this: 

 

Susan Hayward, age 43, made a perfectly credible romantic partner for John Gavin, age 30.  So credible that it didn't even cross my mind until I remembered seeing Hayward in movies from the late 30's.

 

I'm sure that there were other movies like that, but I can't think of any where the older woman and younger man were believably romantic in traditional Hollywood terms.  I'm not thinking of the two movies with Mae West and Cary Grant, which was about as unlikely a match in real life as Harold and Maude.

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Back Street had the usual impossibly saccharine ending  that Hollywood films of that era were forced to be saddled with, but beyond that and the lavish production values, what stood out for me after thinking about it was this: 

 

Susan Hayward, age 43, made a perfectly credible romantic partner for John Gavin, age 30.  So credible that it didn't even cross my mind until I remembered seeing Hayward in movies from the late 30's.

 

I'm sure that there were other movies like that, but I can't think of any where the older woman and younger man were believably romantic in traditional Hollywood terms.  I'm not thinking of the two movies with Mae West and Cary Grant, which was about as unlikely a match in real life as Harold and Maude.

Anyone that looked like Hayward would be a perfectly credible romantic partner for a male of ANY age.

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Andy M108 wrote:  I'm sure that there were other movies like that, but I can't think of any where the older woman and younger man were believably romantic in traditional Hollywood terms.  I'm not thinking of the two movies with Mae West and Cary Grant, which was about as unlikely a match in real life as Harold and Maude.

 

Rock Hudson and Jane Wyman.  In Magnificent Obsession it was not at all noticeable; in All That Heaven Allows it's at the heart of the story. Then there's Greta Garbo and Robert Taylor in Camille or Marlene Dietrich and Arthur Kennedy/Mel Ferrer in Rancho Notorious.  I'm certain there are more.     

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Anyone that looked like Hayward would be a perfectly credible romantic partner for a male of ANY age.

Walter-Brennan1_zpsgfmksaw1.jpg

 

"Now that's the kind of talk I like!"

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Andy M108 wrote:  I'm sure that there were other movies like that, but I can't think of any where the older woman and younger man were believably romantic in traditional Hollywood terms.  I'm not thinking of the two movies with Mae West and Cary Grant, which was about as unlikely a match in real life as Harold and Maude.

 

Rock Hudson and Jane Wyman.  In Magnificent Obsession it was not at all noticeable; in All That Heaven Allows it's at the heart of the story. Then there's Greta Garbo and Robert Taylor in Camille or Marlene Dietrich and Arthur Kennedy/Mel Ferrer in Rancho Notorious.  I'm certain there are more.     

 

Never seen any of those, but no question that pairings like those in the years they were made would have been quite believable.

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Back Street had the usual impossibly saccharine ending  that Hollywood films of that era were forced to be saddled with, but beyond that and the lavish production values, what stood out for me after thinking about it was this: 

 

Susan Hayward, age 43, made a perfectly credible romantic partner for John Gavin, age 30.  So credible that it didn't even cross my mind until I remembered seeing Hayward in movies from the late 30's.

 

I'm sure that there were other movies like that, but I can't think of any where the older woman and younger man were believably romantic in traditional Hollywood terms.  I'm not thinking of the two movies with Mae West and Cary Grant, which was about as unlikely a match in real life as Harold and Maude.

In the film.BACK STREET, it doesn't seem.that Susan Hayward is an older woman compared.to John Gavin. They both seemed about the same age, definitely not.their actual ages. And I think it was believable in this respect, since she didn't look noticeably older than he did.

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In the film.BACK STREET, it doesn't seem.that Susan Hayward is an older woman compared.to John Gavin. They both seemed about the same age, definitely not.their actual ages. And I think it was believable in this respect, since she didn't look noticeably older than he did.

 

I agree, and part of it was that Gavin acted so completely middle aged and proper that he could have met Hayward halfway at somewhere around 35.

 

One other tidbit about Back Street that I just loved, even if it might fly over anyone else's head:

 

In a fleeting scene early in the movie, there's a closeup of a Manhattan traffic signal with only red and green lights---no yellow.  I left New York in 1951 and had come back to visit in 1960 and 1961, and that was how I remembered the lights there then.  When I got to Washington, the yellow lights seemed strange and kind of pointless to a six year old who'd never seen them before, but I soon learned that they were the norm, and Manhattan was the exception.   For those of you who didn't know the Manhattan of the 50's, instead of the yellow light, the green turned red for a few seconds before the opposing red turned green, leaving red signals in all directions while the intersection cleared.

 

It must have made for a lot of rear end collisions!

 

And then by coincidence, that 1961 movie was followed by Valley of the Dolls, shot in 1967.  But in that movie the Manhattan scenes showed yellow lights!

 

So if anyone goes on a trivia quiz show, and the question is "Within a five year range, when did Manhattan add yellow lights to its traffic signals?", now you know the answer. B)

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Not to seem idiotic, but who is the other woman in the photo?

Clue: ever see Vertigo?

 

Nope, wrong guess, it's not Jimmy Stewart.

 

Try again.

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It really doesn't look like Kim, to me.

If you were bold enough to watch the You Tube clip, you might change your mind.

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If you were bold enough to watch the You Tube clip, you might change your mind.

 

Who's the emcee? 

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