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slaytonf

Haywire over Hayward.

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....one thing I don't get: why did they hire Eddie Albert to play pretty much the exact same role in I'LL CRY TOMORROW that he does in SMASH-UP! ? It would seem like the producers of that movie would want to differentiate it from SMASH-UP! at least a little....

 

 

Type casting?

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Hepburn---too skinny........Taylor--got too fat        Dietrich-fell a bit short on both counts

 

Well, everyone cant be perfect like you (LOL) Dietrich short on both counts??? Cant think of anyone who aged better........

 

 

Barbara_Stanwyck_Big_Valley_1968.jpg

                 Barbara Stanwyck at 62

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Barbara_Stanwyck_Big_Valley_1968.jpg

                      Barbara Stanwyck at 62

 

She looks old enough to be my mother.

 

 

No offense, but on a percentage basis your mother would be lucky to look like that at 42, let alone 62.

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The only star who arguably combined beauty and acting ability to the degree that Hayward did was Ingrid Bergman.

Except Ingrid is nice and tall while Susan is, well, rather short (like Alan Ladd) :D

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Last night I watched AND NOW TOMORROW 1944 on You Tube. Yesterday was Alan Ladd`s birthday, Loretta young is one of my favorite actresses, and Susan is SOTM. Everything was fine except the last five minutes of the film were missing. Why post something if the whole film is incomplete. I have the video so I can replay the ending. Besides enjoying Susan being the sneaky, greedy and unfaithful Hester in ADAM HAD FOUR SONS 1941, CANYON PASSAGE 1946 was most enjoyable.The beautiful Technicolor of the Oregon frontier was expertly directed by Jacques Tourneur. A successful businessman Dana Andrews is friends with Brian Donlevy the keeper of the miners gold. Dana is a strong man, and he knows exactly what he wants. Brian is weak, and he plays poker with or without his own money. Susan gets caught in the middle. She is engaged to Brian, but on a trip with Dana she falls in love with him. Dana is engaged to another girl, but in the end she tells him that they do not share the same outlook for life. Brian`s stupidity is his downfall, and Andy Devine, Ward Bond, Lloyd Bridges, and Hoagy Carmichael head up the strong supporting cast.

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I am happy that you got your wish. It is about time that TCM honors a star who has never been chosen before. Susan is a wonderful choice. A beautiful lady who worked her way up in supporting until producer Walter Wanger gave Susan her break thru role in SMASH UP STORY OF A WOMAN 1947. She acted her heart out in this role earning her first Academy Award nomination. Three years before Susan costarred in a movie I really enjoy. Susan plays the younger sister of Loretta Young in AND NOW TOMORROW 1944. Loretta is deaf, but she can read lips. She has seen many doctors, but nobody has been able to help her. Loretta is engaged to Barry Sullivan, but Susan wants him for herself. Cecil Kellaway the local doctor has a young out of town doctor come to the city to help him. Loretta and Susan grew up in a wealthy family, and Alan Ladd the new doctor grew up poor in the same city. He believes that he can help Loretta with her deafness. While bringing her home one night, he notices Susan and Barry together. He doesn`t say anything to Loretta. I enjoy Susan so much in the behind the scenes conniving that she did so well. Tomorrow in ADAM HAD FOUR SONS 1940, she played the same type of role. I will find my video tape so I can see Susan`s performance in AND NOW TOMORROW again.

 

In both ADAM.HAD FOUR SONS, and AND NOW TOMORROW, as well as most of the movies she made in the firsf half of the 40s, mostly at Paramount under contract, Susan Hayward essayed this role, or a variation of it, the ****** second lead. She became quite adept at it, so much so that Paramount's leading ladies did not want to star in a film with her in support.

Edited by TCMModerator1
Edited for language

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I wonder why they had SMASH-UP!: STORY OF A WOMAN on at 6:00 am and BEAU GESTE, which she's in for, what? three? four minutes?, on at 8:00 pm.

 

At least the print they showed was decent (SMASH-UP is in the public domain and needs a restoration.)

I totally agree. TCM should have switched those two time slots. SMASH UP is essential Hayward, and merits a prime time slot, whereas BEAU GESTE is an asterisk in the Hayward filmography. I believe she referred to her role in it as, "I wave to the men at the beginning of the film as they march off, and I wave to them at the end when they return", or something to that effect.

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Last night I watched AND NOW TOMORROW 1944 on You Tube. Yesterday was Alan Ladd`s birthday, Loretta young is one of my favorite actresses, and Susan is SOTM. Everything was fine except the last five minutes of the film were missing. Why post something if the whole film is incomplete. I have the video so I can replay the ending. Besides enjoying Susan being the sneaky, greedy and unfaithful Hester in ADAM HAD FOUR SONS 1941, CANYON PASSAGE 1946 was most enjoyable.The beautiful Technicolor of the Oregon frontier was expertly directed by Jacques Tourneur. A successful businessman Dana Andrews is friends with Brian Donlevy the keeper of the miners gold. Dana is a strong man, and he knows exactly what he wants. Brian is weak, and he plays poker with or without his own money. Susan gets caught in the middle. She is engaged to Brian, but on a trip with Dana she falls in love with him. Dana is engaged to another girl, but in the end she tells him that they do not share the same outlook for life. Brian`s stupidity is his downfall, and Andy Devine, Ward Bond, Lloyd Bridges, and Hoagy Carmichael head up the strong supporting cast.

Walter Wanger's guidance of Susan Hayward's career in the second half of the 40s, securing her such films.as.CANYON PASSAGE, SMASH UP and TULSA,.finally made Susan a star. At the end of the decade, Wanger's financial debacle with JOAN OF ARC led.him to sell her contract.to 20th Century Fox, where she would soon become one of the biggest stars of the 50s.

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I totally agree. TCM should have switched those two time slots. SMASH UP is essential Hayward, and merits a prime time slot, whereas BEAU GESTE is an asterisk in the Hayward filmography. I believe she referred to her role in it as, "I wave to the men at the beginning of the film as they march off, and I wave to them at the end when they return", or something to that effect.

Beau Geste may not have required anything of Hayward as an actress but it had to be a boon for her career to be featured in a major "A" production that was a hit at the 1939 box office. Just the year before this film's release she was making uncredited appearances in films.

 

This was a prestige production for Hayward, even if it is an all male adventure in which her role is just window dressing. Another plus for Susan, she didn't have to share any scenes with Brian Donlevy in the film, an actor despised by a lot of the cast, his personality apparently taking on some of the aspects of the cruel martinet he was playing.

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Beau Geste may not have required anything of Hayward as an actress but it had to be a boon for her career to be featured in a major "A" production that was a hit at the 1939 box office. Just the year before this film's release she was making uncredited appearances in films.

 

This was a prestige production for Hayward, even if it is an all male adventure in which her role is just window dressing. Another plus for Susan, she didn't have to share any scenes with Brian Donlevy in the film, an actor despised by a lot of the cast, his personality apparently taking on some of the aspects of the cruel martinet he was playing.

As mentioned by Ben, BEAU GESTE was the first (and may be the only film) to feature four Best Actor or Actress Oscar winners.,

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In both ADAM.HAD FOUR SONS, and AND NOW TOMORROW, as well as most of the movies she made in the firsf half of the 40s, mostly at Paramount under contract, Susan Hayward essayed this role, or a variation of it, the ****** second lead. She became quite adept at it, so much so that Paramount's leading ladies did not want to star in a film with her in support.

She became known as a ***** both on and off screen. That slowed down her rise to the top tier of actresses.

Edited by TCMModerator1
Edited for language

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She became known as a ***** both on and off screen. That slowed down her rise to the top tier of actresses.

While I appreciate Hayward's ambition to succeed with stronger roles to prove herself, as well as her skill as an actress, that hard nosed ***** quality about her I always found a bit off putting. I have a hard time saying that I actually like Susan Hayward.

 

Somewhere I heard an anecdote that during the filming of Garden of Evil in Mexico some of the cast and crew were gathered in a local bar for relaxation. Hayward then entered the joint and ordered a drink, which she finished by herself. No person came near her. She then left the bar by herself, even though, by now, a well known Hollywood star. The lady could be intimidating.

 

That toughness some will rightly say helped her to be a survivor in a brutal industry known for chewing up so many (though her best roles were behind her, ironically, after she finally won her Oscar for a terrifically honest, tough performance). Again, I can admire the lady but I don't ever seeing myself having feelings of affection for her (I rather doubt that Hayward herself would have ever given a damn about such a thing either).

Edited by TCMModerator1
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While I appreciate Hayward's ambition to succeed with stronger roles to prove herself, as well as her skill as an actress, that hard nosed **** quality about her I always found a bit off putting. I have a hard time saying that I actually like Susan Hayward.

 

Somewhere I heard an anecdote that during the filming of Garden of Evil in Mexico some of the cast and crew were gathered in a local bar for relaxation. Hayward then entered the joint and ordered a drink, which she finished by herself. No person came near her. She then left the bar by herself, even though, by now, a well known Hollywood star. The lady could be intimidating.

 

That toughness some will rightly say helped her to be a survivor in a brutal industry known for chewing up so many (though her best roles were behind her, ironically, after she finally won her Oscar for a terrifically honest, tough performance). Again, I can admire the lady but I don't ever seeing myself having feelings of affection for her (I rather doubt that Hayward herself would have ever given a damn about such a thing either).

I read her bio. Throughout her career, most of her fellow cast members liked her. The executives generally did not.

Edited by TCMModerator1
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