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slaytonf

Haywire over Hayward.

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Honestly, the lyrics to I'LL PLANT MY OWN TREE give one the sense that a gun was pulled on someone in the back seat of a taxi cab and then ordered "write a song about trees in three minutes or I kill you."

I think you've hit on something there. Bad songs written at gunpoint.

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Apparently Dory Previn was no stranger to drug problems which explains a lot about

"I'll Plant My Own Tree."  No one could have been in their right mind and write stuff like

"My TREE will not BE (hey, it rhymes!) just one in a row." 

 

Cole Porter and Ira Gershwin she was not.

 

Lydecker

 

 

LMREO!!!  Why would planting a tree attract friends she doesn't know yet?

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I think you've hit on something there. Bad songs written at gunpoint.

 

 

Can you imagine the lyrics that got thrown in the wastebasket?????

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Can you imagine the lyrics that got thrown in the wastebasket?????

I shudder to think.  Hopefully they were burned.

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I shudder to think.  Hopefully they were burned.

 

LOL.

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Speaking of VOTD (bad music and all) it's too bad that TCM didn't get an interview

with Lee Grant about this movie.  The stories she could tell . . . 

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Speaking of VOTD (bad music and all) it's too bad that TCM didn't get an interview

with Lee Grant about this movie.  The stories she could tell . . . 

 

 

LOL! Yeah, what a thankless role.........probably talked about it in her memoirs (havent read them yet)........

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LOL! Yeah, what a thankless role.........probably talked about it in her memoirs (havent read them yet)........

They are probably fascinating.  She was blacklisted for several years and also directed. 

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They are probably fascinating.  She was blacklisted for several years and also directed. 

Yes, I know. It got mixed reviews, but I do want to read it.......

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a fav 'tough' Hayward of mine...

w/George Sanders to boot! ;)

8:00 PM
B/W

90 min

TV-G

drama

An ambitious designer has to choose between her career and love.

DirMichael Gordon CastSusan Hayward , Dan Dailey , George Sanders .

 

This is just about my favorite Hayward movie ever, and my 3rd or 4th viewing just now did nothing to convince me otherwise.  The only thing I'd add would be to note the always splendid contribution of Sam Jaffe,  best known in many parts as "Doc" Riedenschneider of The Asphalt Jungle fame.

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Susan Hayward did her best, and made it possible for me to endure the last of I Can Get It For You Wholesale.  It's a tribute to how much I admire her that I did, despite the painful experience of listening to the severe lecturing she gets from all sides (including George Sanders!) about how wrong it was for her to be a Bad Girl and try to succeed in the Big World.  The first part of the movie is great, Hayward showing her fierceness, and consuming determination.  There's a lot of no-nonsense dialog about relationships, business, and deciding what's right for you, and sticking to it.  Everybody but the central triumvirate are little more that props to serve the story, but you don't mind, watching her.  The middle of the movie levels off in interest, as complicating elements are introduced, and the Big Roadblock to Success appears.  Of course, 1950s moralizing can't allow a woman to be ambitious to succeed, and can't find love and fulfillment together.  Well, at least the successful world in general is depicted as soulless and immoral.  Smooth and refined, no doubt, but soulless, nonetheless.  But the last part of the movie, where all the big questions are thrashed out, is plain awful.  And that final interview with Noble (a so-obviously ironic name) made me wince to watch, but Susan pulled me through.  One side note:  during the latter part of the movie, I found myself comparing it to Baby Face.  Same use of sex to advance, same cop-out at the end, but I think Baby Face manages it better.

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"Her rendition of I'LL PLANT MY OWN TREE is truly singular."

 

------------

 

Y'all do know that was Margaret Whiting doing the singing, right?

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Susan Hayward did her best, and made it possible for me to endure the last of I Can Get It For You Wholesale.  It's a tribute to how much I admire her that I did, despite the painful experience of listening to the severe lecturing she gets from all sides (including George Sanders!) about how wrong it was for her to be a Bad Girl and try to succeed in the Big World.  The first part of the movie is great, Hayward showing her fierceness, and consuming determination.  There's a lot of no-nonsense dialog about relationships, business, and deciding what's right for you, and sticking to it.  Everybody but the central triumvirate are little more that props to serve the story, but you don't mind, watching her.  The middle of the movie levels off in interest, as complicating elements are introduced, and the Big Roadblock to Success appears.  Of course, 1950s moralizing can't allow a woman to be ambitious to succeed, and can't find love and fulfillment together.  Well, at least the successful world in general is depicted as soulless and immoral.  Smooth and refined, no doubt, but soulless, nonetheless.  But the last part of the movie, where all the big questions are thrashed out, is plain awful.  And that final interview with Noble (a so-obviously ironic name) made me wince to watch, but Susan pulled me through.  One side note:  during the latter part of the movie, I found myself comparing it to Baby Face.  Same use of sex to advance, same cop-out at the end, but I think Baby Face manages it better.

 

Really? Susan Hayward's character used sex to advance her career? I didn't notice that. In fact, it seemed to me that she consistently turned down sexual advances from all who tried. Now, I did miss the first 5 minutes or so of the film, maybe there was a scene there that demostrated Harriet using sex to advance.

 

I wanted to enjoy I Can Get It For You Wholesale, and I expected to enjoy it. But it was disappointing. I never really got into it, I found the whole movie to be oddly flat.

Like you, slayton, I did enjoy Susan Hayward's performance in it. She's always good. As is Sam Jaffe, in an entirely different way, of course.

Not so sure about Dan Dailey. Although he was in a lot of movies, some of them good, I am quite unfamilar with this actor. I looked him up, and I've seen quite a few films he was in. Guess I never noticed him.

 

Anyway, I Can Get It For You Wholesale didn't  quite "work" for me. Maybe it was the way it was stitched together.

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Really? Susan Hayward's character used sex to advance her career? I didn't notice that. In fact, it seemed to me that she consistently turned down sexual advances from all who tried. Now, I did miss the first 5 minutes or so of the film, maybe there was a scene there that demostrated Harriet using sex to advance.

 

I wanted to enjoy I Can Get It For You Wholesale, and I expected to enjoy it. But it was disappointing. I never really got into it, I found the whole movie to be oddly flat.

Like you, slayton, I did enjoy Susan Hayward's performance in it. She's always good. As is Sam Jaffe, in an entirely different way, of course.

Not so sure about Dan Dailey. Although he was in a lot of movies, some of them good, I am quite unfamilar with this actor. I looked him up, and I've seen quite a few films he was in. Guess I never noticed him.

 

Anyway, I Can Get It For You Wholesale didn't  quite "work" for me. Maybe it was the way it was stitched together.

 

Well, by the fifties, the sex gets quite muted, but the impression I got from her set-up with Noble included sleeping together.  After the  disappointingly conventional false impression of culpability scene in Noble's apartment, she was so hurt by the readiness of Teddy to think the worst of her, that she decided she might as well be the worst.  Noble wasn't ambiguous about his interest in her.  And she didn't mind it.   And this type of relationship he had with women was clearly stated earlier in the movie.  But I will make the additional note that in both movies, the heroine has intelligence, talent, drive, and ability.  Sex is a tool used along with her other assets.  It's just more overt in Baby Face.  As for Dan Dailey, can't say I'm a big fan.

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a fav 'tough' Hayward of mine...

w/George Sanders to boot! ;)

8:00 PM
B/W

90 min

TV-G

drama

An ambitious designer has to choose between her career and love.

DirMichael Gordon CastSusan Hayward , Dan Dailey , George Sanders .

I know I'm the one who was really pushing for Hayward for SOTM. but after watching a few minutes of WHOLESALE, I decided that, tonight, Tom Brady was vastly preferable to Susan Hayward.i

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"Her rendition of I'LL PLANT MY OWN TREE is truly singular."

 

------------

 

Y'all do know that was Margaret Whiting doing the singing, right?

 

When I made the original post, there was a lingering doubt in my mind as to whether or not Susan was dubbed (I know she usually was, but sometimes she wasn't when it came to her singing on film.) By the time I went and looked it up and saw she was dubbed, quite a few people had liked/or quoted the post, so I figured it best to just let it lie.

 

but yeah, watching the clip, that is obviously not Susan singing, so thanks for the correction.

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Last night I was doing other things, with The President's Lady playing on TCM in the background.  It was the scene where Susan Hayward was talking to an old woman.  I'd never seen this movie, so I didn't know the old woman's last name was Robards, but I kept hearing Hayward refer to her as Mother Rhubarb.  "Yes, Mother Rhubarb!  I'll try, Mother Rhubarb!"  Laughing out loud, I walked closer to the tv thinking to myself, "I couldn't possibly be hearing that right!"

 

:lol:

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This is just about my favorite Hayward movie ever, and my 3rd or 4th viewing just now did nothing to convince me otherwise.  The only thing I'd add would be to note the always splendid contribution of Sam Jaffe,  best known in many parts as "Doc" Riedenschneider of The Asphalt Jungle fame.

 

 

First time for me (have wanted to see it for ages) and really enjoyed it. GREAT dialogue.

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When I made the original post, there was a lingering doubt in my mind as to whether or not Susan was dubbed (I know she usually was, but sometimes she wasn't when it came to her singing on film.) By the time I went and looked it up and saw she was dubbed, quite a few people had liked/or quoted the post, so I figured it best to just let it lie.

 

but yeah, watching the clip, that is obviously not Susan singing, so thanks for the correction.

 

 

I knew that, but she still had to put the song over with those menacing mobiles. A truly memorable number!!!

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Susan Hayward did her best, and made it possible for me to endure the last of I Can Get It For You Wholesale.  It's a tribute to how much I admire her that I did, despite the painful experience of listening to the severe lecturing she gets from all sides (including George Sanders!) about how wrong it was for her to be a Bad Girl and try to succeed in the Big World.  The first part of the movie is great, Hayward showing her fierceness, and consuming determination.  There's a lot of no-nonsense dialog about relationships, business, and deciding what's right for you, and sticking to it.  Everybody but the central triumvirate are little more that props to serve the story, but you don't mind, watching her.  The middle of the movie levels off in interest, as complicating elements are introduced, and the Big Roadblock to Success appears.  Of course, 1950s moralizing can't allow a woman to be ambitious to succeed, and can't find love and fulfillment together.  Well, at least the successful world in general is depicted as soulless and immoral.  Smooth and refined, no doubt, but soulless, nonetheless.  But the last part of the movie, where all the big questions are thrashed out, is plain awful.  And that final interview with Noble (a so-obviously ironic name) made me wince to watch, but Susan pulled me through.  One side note:  during the latter part of the movie, I found myself comparing it to Baby Face.  Same use of sex to advance, same cop-out at the end, but I think Baby Face manages it better.

 

 

Well, Baby Face was a pre-code so a big difference there. This had the 50's code stifling the realism, you just had to read through the lines. They couldn't go there.

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Last night I was doing other things, with The President's Lady playing on TCM in the background.  It was the scene where Susan Hayward was talking to an old woman.  I'd never seen this movie, so I didn't know the old woman's last name was Robards, but I kept hearing Hayward refer to her as Mother Rhubarb.  "Yes, Mother Rhubarb!  I'll try, Mother Rhubarb!"  Laughing out loud, I walked closer to the tv thinking to myself, "I couldn't possibly be hearing that right!"

 

:lol:

 

 

I was able to record this by doing some editing. Hope to watch it this wknd. DVR was almost full. I remember liking it years ago.....

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I know I'm the one who was really pushing for Hayward for SOTM. but after watching a few minutes of WHOLESALE, I decided that, tonight, Tom Brady was vastly preferable to Susan Hayward.I

 

Typical..........

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I knew that, but she still had to put the song over with those menacing mobiles. A truly memorable number!!!

 

That mobile always brings to mind the ABSOLUTELY FABULOUS episode where Edina desperately wants to be the friend of some high-end, fash-hag jet setter played by Miranda Richardson and she and Patsy visit their house in a flashback. It's got no furniture, just "clean spaces" and a giant mobile in the center of the room that Patsy, naturally, becomes entangled in in her perma-inebriated state.

 

Please tell me someone else out there remembers this too.

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