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All Aboard - Trains in Movies


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In "I'll Be Seeing You" (1944), Ginger Rogers and Joseph Cotten play characters who meet on a train headed for her hometown. He doesn't know that she's been furloughed from prison for Christmas. She's unaware that he's a decorated World War II veteran trying to cope with physical and psychological wounds incurred during his military service in the Pacific Theater.

 

 

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I believe one of the attractive things about passenger trains is that they had "romantic" names, whereas planes and plane routes did not.  The airliners did name planes in the early days, but it quickly died out.

Sunset Limited, Orange Blossom Special, Broadway Limited (which has nothing to do with Broadway in NYC), 20th Century Limited, Super Chief, City of New Orleans, Florida Special, Empire Builder, Southern Crescent, Phoebe Snow, California Zephyr, Texas Eagle, Silver Meteor, and many more.

 

You can check out wikipededia; list of named passenger trains in US; for hundreds more.  There were probably thousands of named trains.  Railroads often changed names every 10-20 years on some routings.

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I love trains, the sound, the whistle.  I live in the MidWest, not far from Kansas City and there are many trains moving through.  I especially love the trains at night!!!! oh I miss trains.  You definitely don't have time to fall in love on a plane or catch up with the man you love (Love in the Afternoon) or kill your dreadful Uncle Charlie (Shadow of a Doubt).

 

Many train afficiandos ride the rails when they can but it is not the same.  I wanted to re-live "move trains" and had the opportunity to do so when I went to Omaha.  They have a fantastic rail depot and it has been restored inside as well.   Additionally they have preserved rail cars from the different eras that you are able to tour and sit in....

 

If you want to read a great book about trains, train stations and middle-Westerners during World War II, I encourage you to read "Once About a Town, the Miracle of the North Platte Canteen" it has trains and lots of other scenarios that exhibit America as it once was.  You can read a review on Goodreads and puruse the canteen via photos on the Canteens own website.  Woo!! Woo!!

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I believe one of the attractive things about passenger trains is that they had "romantic" names, whereas planes and plane routes did not.  The airliners did name planes in the early days, but it quickly died out.

Sunset Limited, Orange Blossom Special, Broadway Limited (which has nothing to do with Broadway in NYC), 20th Century Limited, Super Chief, City of New Orleans, Florida Special, Empire Builder, Southern Crescent, Phoebe Snow, California Zephyr, Texas Eagle, Silver Meteor, and many more.

 

You can check out wikipededia; list of named passenger trains in US; for hundreds more.  There were probably thousands of named trains.  Railroads often changed names every 10-20 years on some routings.

Don't certain flights have names?

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Don't certain flights have names?

They may, but probably not that many.  And I don't think the flight names are publicized in the manner the train names were.

Incidentally, "train day" is Oct. 9th starting at 6 AM ET.

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They may, but probably not that many.  And I don't think the flight names are publicized in the manner the train names were.

Incidentally, "train day" is Oct. 9th starting at 6 AM ET.

I know that United's JFK to LAX flight used to be called "Ocean to Ocean".

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Here's a train film I'd like to see, but it's presumed to be lost:

The Gods of Fate (1916)

 

Untitled_zpscyr2tyob.png

 

After researching contemporary newspapers, I discovered that the film features a head-on crash between a passenger train and a freight train. It cost $25,000 to film the scene. Fifteen cameramen were used to film the crash. To protect themselves from steam and flying debris, they worked behind armor-plated shields. (Note:  imdb.com has no plot listed for the film, nor could I find one. But you can read my train account under the trivia category for this film - it's legit.)

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scsu1975--imdb has Rosetta Brice listed as BETTY Brice, for some reason.  Check under that name.

Rosetta changed her name to Betty later in her career. All of her films are now listed under Betty Brice, including "The Erring," from 1914.  I mention "The Erring" because it is a film, previously unknown, that I recently added to their database.

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Rosetta changed her name to Betty later in her career. All of her films are now listed under Betty Brice, including "The Erring," from 1914.  I mention "The Erring" because it is a film, previously unknown, that I recently added to their database.

..but it's not the usual practice, when an actor changes his or her name, to make the change retroactive, is it?

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..but it's not the usual practice, when an actor changes his or her name, to make the change retroactive, is it?

Not that I'm aware of. All of Brice's films are mentioned under Betty (in imdb) , but it is noted that in her earlier films, she used a different first name. This is like a Herb/Jason Evers kind of thing or Al/David Hedison situation.

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Not that I'm aware of. All of Brice's films are mentioned under Betty (in imdb) , but it is noted that in her earlier films, she used a different first name. This is like a Herb/Jason Evers kind of thing or Al/David Hedison situation.

Throw in Touch/Mike Connors while we're at it!

 

 

Sepiatone

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Trains have been both major and minor characters in movies for umpteen years. No matter the genre or plot, filmmakers love featuring trains.  Some of my favorite films featuring trains are: The Narrow Margin (1952), Silver Streak, Some Like It Hot, The Major And The Minor, The Palm Beach Story, Closely Watched Trains, Union Station, Gloria (Cassavettes /Gena Rowlands Original), The Train, The Lady Vanishes (1938 Hitchcock original), Murder On The Orient Express (Sidney Lumet), The Taking of Pelham One Two Three (1974 Original), Berlin Express, Strangers On A Train, Agatha Christie's Poirot Series starring David Suchet - Murder On The Orient Express (Masterpiece Mystery PBS), Bad Day At Black Rock, Union Depot, and The Lady Eve. What's your favorite train movies.

Just to get back to original post.

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The film PICNIC has drifter William Holden arriving in town hitchhiking on a freight train ( at that time many people still  traveled from town to town by trains, although most bought a ticket and rode a passenger train).  At the end of the film when its time for Holden to leave town he again has to resort to hopping a freight train.

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In the film 12 ANGRY MEN a train plays an important part in the story line, even though we never see the train itself.  One of the eye witnesses to the murder case claims to have seen the crime even though an El  train was passing between the apartment buildings in question at the moment. Is it possible that anyone could see through the windows of a passing train to identify the killer?

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In the film 12 ANGRY MEN a train plays an important part in the story line, even though we never see the train itself.  One of the eye witnesses to the murder case claims to have seen the crime even though an El  train was passing between the apartment buildings in question at the moment. Is it possible that anyone could see through the windows of a passing train to identify the killer?

 

Maybe Clark Kent could.

 

I don't think the setting of 12 ANGRY MEN is specified, but  I always think of it as being set in Chicago because of the part about the el train.

I know there are also elevated trains in New York City, but for some reason I think of the story as happening in Chicago. 

In the movie version Henry Fonda has a definite Midwestern vibe.

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Maybe Clark Kent could.

 

I don't think the setting of 12 ANGRY MEN is specified, but  I always think of it as being set in Chicago because of the part about the el train.

I know there are also elevated trains in New York City, but for some reason I think of the story as happening in Chicago. 

In the movie version Henry Fonda has a definite Midwestern vibe.

 

I believe "12 Angry Men" is definitely set in New York City. There are establishing shots that show it takes place at what was the New York County Courthouse at 60 Centre St. in Manhattan. It is now the New York State Supreme Court Building. 

 

Plus, you have to remember that Sidney Lumet was the quintessential director of films about New York. I wouldn't be surprised if 90 percent of his films take place there.

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I agree with "Holden is Here" - 12 Angry Men takes place in a jury room located in the New York County Court located at 60 Centre Street, Manhattan. I've been called for jury duty in this court house and it is extremely majestic as is shown at the end of the movie when Henry Fonda and Joseph Sweeney meet outside after it has been raining and walk down those incredible long wide steps in front of the courthouse. I was intrigued about Reginald Rose, the writer of the screenplay, and the original teleplay which was broadcast "live" no do-overs on CBS' Studio One Playhouse in 1954. The original teleplay was considered lost but was found in 2003 and you can watch it on youtube. The TV broadcast takes place entirely in the jury room with no outside location scenes. Sidney Lumet, one of my favorite directors who shot most of his films in NYC literally made this the classic movie it is. Reginald Rose was on a jury and while in the jury room the members of "his jury" got very emotional and this is where he got his story line. He continued to be interested in the judicial system in our country and most of his work was centered on this theme, one of his most notable TV shows being "The Defenders" starring E.G. Marshall (one of the jurors in the film). The only original TV cast members are Joseph Sweeney and George Voskovic who reprise their roles in the movie. I love 12 Angry Men and have seen it on the stage in 2005 with Boyd Gaines, James Rebhorn and Philip Bosco. The play was wonderful but the 12 Angry Men directed by Sidney Lumet is a masterpiece in film making.

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I believe "12 Angry Men" is definitely set in New York City. There are establishing shots that show it takes place at what was the New York County Courthouse at 60 Centre St. in Manhattan. It is now the New York State Supreme Court Building. 

 

Plus, you have to remember that Sidney Lumet was the quintessential director of films about New York. I wouldn't be surprised if 90 percent of his films take place there.

 

Good point about Lumet and New York.

 

Interestingly enough , New Yorker Lumet's THE FUGITIVE KIND is (in my opinion) the best movie adaptation of a Tennessee Williams's play even though the play it's adapted from is not Williams's best play.

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I agree with "Holden is Here" - 12 Angry Men takes place in a jury room located in the New York County Court located at 60 Centre Street, Manhattan. I've been called for jury duty in this court house and it is extremely majestic as is shown at the end of the movie when Henry Fonda and Joseph Sweeney meet outside after it has been raining and walk down those incredible long wide steps in front of the courthouse. I was intrigued about Reginald Rose, the writer of the screenplay, and the original teleplay which was broadcast "live" no do-overs on CBS' Studio One Playhouse in 1954. The original teleplay was considered lost but was found in 2003 and you can watch it on youtube. The TV broadcast takes place entirely in the jury room with no outside location scenes. Sidney Lumet, one of my favorite directors who shot most of his films in NYC literally made this the classic movie it is. Reginald Rose was on a jury and while in the jury room the members of "his jury" got very emotional and this is where he got his story line. He continued to be interested in the judicial system in our country and most of his work was centered on this theme, one of his most notable TV shows being "The Defenders" starring E.G. Marshall (one of the jurors in the film). The only original TV cast members are Joseph Sweeney and George Voskovic who reprise their roles in the movie. I love 12 Angry Men and have seen it on the stage in 2005 with Boyd Gaines, James Rebhorn and Philip Bosco. The play was wonderful but the 12 Angry Men directed by Sidney Lumet is a masterpiece in film making.

Weren't women selected for juries in NYC in the '50s?

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Weren't women selected for juries in NYC in the '50s?

 

Well if there was a women in that jury the name of the play\movie would have to be 11 Angry Men and one ******* women.

 

Because back than there was only one term for an angry or aggressive women.

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Weren't women selected for juries in NYC in the '50s?

Women certainly served on juries in NYC in the 1950s, however it was easier for them to get exemptions. Today, it's very difficult for anyone to get an exemption in NYC.

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