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THE BRAIN THAT WOULDN'T DIE ALERT!!!


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aka JAN IN THE PAN. Tonight at 1AM! i havent seen it in awhile so am looking forward to it. Hope it's the unedited version! :D

aka THE MOVIE THAT IS SO BAD IT'S GOOD?. Of course that title would be appropriate for a number of films. ;)

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Meaning the version where we see the monster spit out that McNugget looking thing after biting the guy in the neck, then picks it up and looks at it?

 

(Sorry, I don't think that "spoils" anything for anyone who hasn't seen this movie.)

 

Yes, the creature from the closet spits out some flesh. 

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REVIEW OF THE BRAIN THAT WOULDN'T DIE FROM VIDEOHOUND'S HORROR SHOW

 

This obscure little '50s schlocker deserves a place in the Alternate Hall of Fame (or Shame). Though writer/director Joseph Green never reaches the heights that Ed Wood, Jr., achieved, it's not for lack of trying. After a painfully slow, uneventful introduction and an off-camera car crash, a mad scientist (Herb Evers) keeps his decapitated fiancé Janey's (Virginia Leith) head alive on a tray in his lab. He tenderly advises the noggin, "Sleep, my darling, rest and grow stronger," and then sets out to strip clubs and modeling agencies to find a suitable body for reattachment. Yes, this mad scientist is also a lounge lizard! Janey, meanwhile, has gone a little nutso -- and who could blame her? -- psychically contacting the creature who lives in the lab closet. But the film really belongs to Leslie Daniel as the henchman Kurt. He and Janey engage in such long philosophical conversations, you'd think they're Vladimir and Estragon waiting for Godot, not the closet creature. None of that -- bizarre as it is -- can prepare the viewer for Kurt's death. It is a full 2 minutes and 45 seconds of rabid, unfettered scenery chewing which must be seen to be appreciated.

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How did Virginia Leith get in this??  She had starred in some actual movies;  "A Kiss Before Dying" (1956, 3rd billing), "Violent Saturday" (1955, 4th billing), "Black Widow" (1954, 7th billing), etc. :unsure:

 

it's a topic that's come up before.

 

personally, from what i've seen of her pre-BRAIN work, namely BLACK WIDOW and A KISS BEFORE DYING, I think she was not a terribly good actress, although some like her.

 

she had a unique look and voice, but the latter has a flat, monotonous quality that makes her line reads stiff.

 

EDIT- I am a huge MST 3K fan and I  prefer the Mike Nelson era. THE BRAIN THAT... was the first movie they did with him and it was a great choice. I've seen BRAIN as part of the MST episode many, many times and watching it sans commentary would be impossible for me, although I can just about remember most of the quips BY HEART.

 

One of my absolute favorite riffs they do on the movie follows a particularly stilted laugh from Jan in the Pan which pretty much is a literal read of "ha ha ha", which Crow- who mimicked her voice very well- follows up with a stiff "I'M LAUGHING!"

 

It just nails Leith's weaknesses as an actress for me.

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I see that either a Mod or member was so shocked or offended by the videos of the first heart-lung machine developed by the Russians in 1940, that they removed not only my links to them, but my entire post from last night. GRAPHIC WARNING, et al.

 

Granted, the videos were graphic, and if not staged, certainly depicted the primitive instrumentation and principal technology that is today used upon any person who has had open heart surgery, such as coronary artery bypass grafts (CABG), or heart or lung transplantation.  

 

Of course the initial Soviet experimentation to develop this technology occurred upon animals, and not humans, as was occuring during Nazi Germany around the same time.

 

Animal lovers, and especially dog  lovers, such as myself, are at first shocked and then repulsed by the cold graphic depictions.

But some of us are compelled to watch with a more critical eye.

 

The first time that I saw these I was in school. It was part of a scientific study that illustrated the roots of some of our life saving "miracle" technology today, and followed with an ethical discussion about how far we should go in practice.

 

Students who had already attended that class were all abuzz among themselves about it, and would briefly forewarn others about "The Video" without much "spoiler" elaboration. Such as, "just wait until after you've seen it, then we'll talk..."

And we certainly did do just that.

 

Just because we have the technology to transplant the head of one animal on to the body of another, should we attempt to do so with humans?

 

Today, organ transplantation is almost routine. Everyone is encouraged to fill-out a donor card, and there is always a long waiting list for recipients. We think little of it today. Perhaps to little. Often we do not stop to think about the many hundreds of animal lives that paid the price for mankind to have such technology today. Perhaps no more than anyone who has never butchered their own meat, nor seen animals in a feed lot, nor been in a slaughterhouse, will seriously consider where their steak came from.

 

The movies TCM aired last night were only part science fiction.

Even at the time of their production, experimentation was taking place in Britain, Germany, the Soviet Union, and United States, that would eventually lead to todays transplant techology.

 

Mad Love (1935) hand transplants

Hands of a Stranger (1962) hand transplants

The Brain That Wouldn't Die (1959, release 1962) organ,head, body tansplants

Corruption (1967) face tranplants

Eyes Without a Face (1959) face tranplants

 

What shocked their viewers then, should not be so shocking today.

Hand, arm and limb transplants and full face transplants are performed on humans today, restoring usefulness and dignity to the recipients lives. Even head transplantation has occurred, though arguably only on animals (at least that is the reported story).

 

After watching a night of such horror dramatizations, I was moved to shed some reality on the subject matter for those interested TCM board members.

Did I think it would shock some, you bet; revile some others, very likely; and yet I knew that there would be a few that would be drawn to watch, or come back to them later with a more critical eye, and perhaps be enlightened, and want to talk about it.

 

I did not go into such an elaboration in that post, perhaps I should have. But I quite frankly did not think it would be necessary for mature adults.

I did post a bold, all cap warning that they were NOT FOR THE SQUEAMISH.

I thought that would be sufficient without an elaborate "Spoiler" explanation.

Anyone who got beyond the first "shock" factor, would realize that these were in fact archival videos of actual scientific study.

 

No one was forced to click on a link and watch them anymore than one was forced to watch the TCM horror fest last night.

Today, I did expect to see some comments and hoped we could have a relevant discussion, both about the TCM movies and the reality behind them.  

 

But someone here was apparently so offended by the actual posted links to those videos that the Moderator saw fit to delete my entire (however brief,) post.

I will not again directly link those videos.  

However, if any member, after having read through this post, is curious to see and judge for themselves, I do provide the following information so that if they choose they may google the video title and then watch any or all of these videos.

Assuming that this thread will not be censored or deleted, I look forward to having a further, hopefully "mature" discussion about both the titular movie of this thread, as well as the others that TCM aired. And, the actual science behind them.

 

Go to Google or YouTube and enter any of the below video titles.

 

Russian scientists successfully reanimate dead dog's head (1940)

A Monkey Head Transplant (Part 1/2) - YouTube

A Monkey Head Transplant (Part 2/2) - YouTube

 

These videos are 19.33 min, 14.59 min, and 18.17 min, respectively.

 

I apologize to those who found the verbosity of this post excessive and  unnecessary.

Unfortunetly there are one or more viewers (or the Mod) who evidently require such elaboration to either NOT click on a posted link, or to justify the non-deletion of a legitimate and TCM movie related post.

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I see that either a Mod or member was so shocked or offended by the videos of the first heart-lung machine developed by the Russians in 1940, that they removed not only my links to them, but my entire post. GRAPHIC WARNING, et al.

I noticed your post when I checked in, during the wee hours, and intended to go back to read it this morning. It was gone! They are getting rather over sensitive these days.

 

Your mention of reanimation reminds me of an interview with director Vincent Sherman, in the comments section of the Return of Dr. X DVD. The segment of the film where the rabbit is reanimated looks like real thought went into all that tubing and electronics. In the interview, Sherman is asked how all that was put together, did it require a lot of research. Sherman replied, "No, I just called the prop department and said, 'I gotta bring a rabbit back to life. Bring me a lot of stuff."

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I noticed your post when I checked in, during the wee hours, and intended to go back to read it this morning. It was gone! They are getting rather over sensitive these days.

 

Your mention of reanimation reminds me of an interview with director Vincent Sherman, in the comments section of the Return of Dr. X DVD. The segment of the film where the rabbit is reanimated looks like real thought went into all that tubing and electronics. In the interview, Sherman is asked how all that was put together, did it require a lot of research. Sherman replied, "No, I just called the prop department and said, 'I gotta bring a rabbit back to life. Bring me a lot of stuff."

Well, for what it's worth I have reposted with extreme elaboration, this time.

No telling how long this post may be up.

Because of such censureship issues, I sometimes feel that posting on these boards is like I am talking to "little children" and not mature adults, which is the assumption that I generally make.

 

There was some question regarding the validity of those videos so I also posted a Wikipedia link last night as well.

We can stage practically anything today, but one of these videos goes back to 1940.

Granted, there is still the possibility that the video itself was "staged" in it's depiction, but the science behind it was not.

 

When i watch a sci-fi/horror flic today I sometimes can't help but do so with a critical eye.

i.e. what, if any, is the science behind this.

Last nights TCM showings left plenty of room for such thought.

 

I was hoping to have a lively discussion this AM about the topics, but unfortunetly only a few, such as yourself, ever saw my post before it was yanked.

Well, let's see how long this one survives.

Perhaps I should have created a new thread, but this one was so appropos, I thought it would do no harm.

It does sadden me to see the level of unneccessary censorship on these boards.

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Stephen -- I've screen shot your recent post and will check out those videos later.

 

Nipkow -- The thing in the closet bit off a piece of the Doc's neck with intent to eat it, but he didn't like the taste, so he spit it out. "Things" sometimes have very discerning palates!

 

 

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"Stephan55, posted today, 10:58 a.m."

 

"Just because we have the technology to transplant the head of one animal on to the body of another,should we attempt to do so with humans?"

 

This is not such a ridiculous question as it seemed in 1962.  We (the U.S.) have done a facial transplant (remember the woman who had her face bitten off by a chimpanzee in 2009?)  When my mother died of Parkinson's, she had the brain implant mechanism that kept her tremors under some control donated to the University of Tennessee's Veterinary Center--where it was implanted in a CAT that had Parkinson's (yes, cats and dogs get Parkinson's Disease).  An interesting question, to say the least.

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Stephen -- I've screen shot your recent post and will check out those videos later.

 

Nipkow -- The thing in the closet bit off a piece of the Doc's neck with intent to eat it, but he didn't like the taste, so he spit it out. "Things" sometimes have very discerning palates!

I bet the thing from the closet doan like melted cheese on his pizza either. :D

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"Stephan55, posted today, 10:58 a.m."

 

"Just because we have the technology to transplant the head of one animal on to the body of another,should we attempt to do so with humans?"

 

This is not such a ridiculous question as it seemed in 1962.  We (the U.S.) have done a facial transplant (remember the woman who had her face bitten off by a chimpanzee in 2009?)  When my mother died of Parkinson's, she had the brain implant mechanism that kept her tremors under some control donated to the University of Tennessee's Veterinary Center--where it was implanted in a CAT that had Parkinson's (yes, cats and dogs get Parkinson's Disease).  An interesting question, to say the least.

Yes, I am very aware of those cases, and others.

There has been a great deal of productive research regarding Parkinsons Dz & syndrome using stem cell implants.

The use of fetal stem cells for this research was curtailed in the U.S. during the Reagan administration, making Europe the research leader at that time. Today, using stem cells, the U.S. is back on track and great strides are again being made here.  

I make no judgement call on any of this.

What's done is done, and what will be done, will be done.

I presented these videos as a "balanced" reflection in light of the movies that TCM aired last night-this AM, for contemplation and discussion. We all have certain opinions regarding these topics, and the topic itself is controversial on many levels.  

I believe that the best decisions are informed decisions, and the more informed we are about specific subject matter the better.

When you get a chance to watch the interview with Dr. Robert White, I think that you may find it very enlightening.

Dr. White was a Catholic and had to rationalize the potential benefits of his research with his religious beliefs.

His research was groundbreaking yet few, beyond those in the field of neuroscience, even know who he was today. He passed away in 2010.

I'd like to hear back from you and others after you have watched these videos.

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