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Songs have always played an important part in movies, and whenever I hear a certain song, I'm reminded of the particular movie where I heard it.

 

Oh Give Me Something To Remember You By -- Mr. Lucky -- Cary Grant keeps whistling this tune and it is heard throughout the movie.

 

La Mer (Beyond The Sea) - Every Girl Should Be Married - This song is heard throughout the film and I've always loved it especially Bobby Darin's recording.

 

Flight of the Bumble Bee -- Radio Days - Love this movie and all the songs, but this one sticks out.

 

How High The Moon - My Favorite Year - Love the movie, love Peter O'Toole and love Les Paul and Mary Ford's recording of this song.

 

A Nightingale Sang in Barkley Square - Manhunt - Great movie directed by Fritz Lang starring Walter Pidgeon, Joan Bennett and George Sanders - and this song is heard throughout the movie.

 

Knock On Wood - Casablanca - Always think of Sam playing several songs at his piano, but this one really sticks out for me with the customers knocking on wood to the song.

 

You Made Me Love You - Hannah And Her Sisters - So many songs in this movie but this one really sticks out for me. I think that Woody Allen has used Harry James recording of You Made Me Love You in so many of his films.

 

Well, that's just a few, what songs remind you of which movie. 

 

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"Over the Rainbow"--"The Wizard of Oz" (1939)--first saw it in the early 70"s when they did yearly showings--I've seen it 30+ times by now.

 

Mussorgsky"s "Night On Bald Mountain". followed by Gounods' (sp?) "Ave Maria"--"Fantasia" (1940)--NOBM music still gives me chills!

 

"Singin' in the Rain" from 1952 film of same name--is irrevocably associated with Gene Kelly--I avoid Kubrick's "A Clockwork Orange" (1971)--I know, I know, it's my loss, etc,etc,   

 

"The Merry Widow Waltz" by Franz Lehar--"Shadow of a Doubt" (1943)--I always associate it with Hitchcock.

 

"Que, Sera, Sera (What Will Be, Will Be)"--"The Man Who Knew Too Much" (1956).

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For some strange reason that song they used to play on those old Marlboro cigarette TV commercials always reminded me of certain Yul Brynner/Steve McQueen starring western!

 

(...go figure, huh) ;)

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Dargo - The Marlboro commercial used the score from The Magnificent Seven and probably made a fortune. I think the score from that movie is one of the most recognizable and made a helluva commercial.

 

If any one director has used songs from the Great American Songbook and classical and jazz as well in his films it's Woody Allen. Here's a few of the ones that I'm reminded of.

 

Seems Like Old Times -- Annie Hall

 

Prokofiev - Love And Death - Whenever I hear anything Prokofiev I immediately think of this hysterically wonderful film.

 

The Big Noise From Winnetka & Sing, Sing, Sing - Manhattan Murder Mystery

 

I've Heard That Song Before - Harry James great recording - Hannah And Her Sisters

 

Rosalie - Crimes And Misdemeanors (Woody uses Rosalie a lot)

 

Agita - Broadway Danny Rose -- this song runs through the entire film

 

Rhapsody In Blue -- Manhattan -- One of the greatest openings to a movie I've ever seen with Gershwin's Rhapsody In Blue

 

I'm Thru With Love - Everyone Says I Love You

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Together -- Since You Went Away - throughout the film this song is heard

 

Everybody's Talkin - Midnight Cowboy

 

See What The Boys In the Back Room Will Have - Marlene Dietrich in Destry Rides Again

 

You'll Never Know -- Alice Faye signature song from Hello Frisco Hello

 

Sisters -- Bing Crosby and Danny Kaye imitating Rosie Clooney and Vera Ellen in White Christmas

 

Get Happy -- Judy Garland in Summer Stock

 

The Man That Got Away - Judy Garland - A Star is Born

 

I Heard It Through The Grapevine - The Big Chill - Every time I hear this song I think of The Big Chill along with all the other great songs e.g. You Can't Always Get What You Want, Gimme Some Lovin, Ain't To Proud To Beg, etc.

 

Ravel's Bolero - 10

 

Isn't It Romantic - Sabrina (original Billy Wilder)

 

All The Way - Frank Sinatra singing this great song in The Joker is Wild

 

It's Magic - Romance On The High Seas and Doris Day in her film debut

 

The Night They Invented Champagne and Thank Heaven For Little Girls -- Gigi

 

Begin The Beguine - Broadway Melody of 1940 - One of the greatest tap routines ever by Fred Astaire and Eleanor Powell

 

Let's Call The Whole Thing Off - Shall We Dance -- Fred And Ginger on roller skates in Central Park singing words and music by George and Ira Gershwin

 

 

 

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Songs have always played an important part in movies, and whenever I hear a certain song, I'm reminded of the particular movie where I heard it.

 

Oh Give Me Something To Remember You By -- Mr. Lucky -- Cary Grant keeps whistling this tune and it is heard throughout the movie.

 

La Mer (Beyond The Sea) - Every Girl Should Be Married - This song is heard throughout the film and I've always loved it especially Bobby Darin's recording.

 

Flight of the Bumble Bee -- Radio Days - Love this movie and all the songs, but this one sticks out.

 

How High The Moon - My Favorite Year - Love the movie, love Peter O'Toole and love Les Paul and Mary Ford's recording of this song.

 

A Nightingale Sang in Barkley Square - Manhunt - Great movie directed by Fritz Lang starring Walter Pidgeon, Joan Bennett and George Sanders - and this song is heard throughout the movie.

 

Knock On Wood - Casablanca - Always think of Sam playing several songs at his piano, but this one really sticks out for me with the customers knocking on wood to the song.

 

You Made Me Love You - Hannah And Her Sisters - So many songs in this movie but this one really sticks out for me. I think that Woody Allen has used Harry James recording of You Made Me Love You in so many of his films.

 

Well, that's just a few, what songs remind you of which movie. 

In a totally different vein, "Mr. Soul", by Buffalo Springfield, which I had totally forgotten about until I heard snatches of it in SHAMPOO recently.

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Songs from 2 "Road" movies Moonlight Becomes You in Road to Morocco and But Beautiful in Road to Rio - love Bing Crosby's voice

 

Just hearing the lyrics sung by Simon and Garfunkel "Hello darkness, my old friend. I've come to talk with you again" from The Sounds of Silence immediately conjures up The Graduate. Mrs. Robinson, Scarborough Fair, The Sounds of Silence - are so much a part of this film.

 

Let's Face The Music And Dance - Follow The Fleet - Fred and Ginger dancing to Irving Berlin's incredible song

 

Smile - Modern Times - Music composed by Charles Chaplin has become a standard for so many singers, notably Nat Cole and Tony Bennett

 

Love is The Tender Trap - Film The Tender Trap - opens with Frank Sinatra singing this great song

 

On Broadway recorded by George Benson is the fabulous opening sequence in Bob Fosse's All That Jazz

 

Falling In Love Again - The Blue Angel - The great Marlene Dietrich's signature song

 

Secret Love - Calamity Jane - Doris Day is dazzling riding her horse singing this great song

 

Let The River Run - Carly Simon's song in Working Girl is fabulous

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"Raindrops Keep Fallin' On My Head" always brings up images from "Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid" (1969).

 

"On the Atchison, Topeka, and the Santa Fe" immediately makes me remember the film "The Harvey Girls" (1946).

 

"You're The Top" (especially if sung by Barbra Streisand) makes me think of "What's Up, Doc" (1972).

 

"It's All Right With Me" makes me think of the film "Can-Can" (1960).  Sinatra sang a version of that song in the film he never topped, IMHO.

 

Can't believe nobody's mentioned this yet, but--"As Time Goes By" is Always associated with "Casablanca" (1942), at least for me.

 

The song "High Hopes" makes me think of Sinatras' film "A Hole In The Head" (1959).

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Many of these have already been mentioned, but here goes:

 

"One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)," evokes the image of Sinatra in Young at Heart, sitting in a smoky bar, alone, and playing the piano while crooning this song.  While I typically associate torch songs with female singers, this is probably as close to a male torch song as you can get.  I absolutely love this song and this rendition.  I love songs that are very simple, just the singer accompanying themselves on piano or guitar (or whatever) and singing.  Audrey Hepburn's "Moon River" in Breakfast at Tiffany's has the same effect for me.  

 

Judy Garland has so many great songs that she introduced in films.  When I hear these songs, I instantly think of one of her films:

 

"Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas," Meet Me in St. Louis.  Such a beautiful rendition and one of my favorite Christmas songs.

 

"The Trolley Song," Meet Me in St. Louis.  Another great song and so catchy. 

 

"Get Happy," Summer Stock.  Someone already mentioned this song, but it's one of the all time great Judy Garland songs and for me, instantly brings up an image of Judy in a tuxedo jacket, fedora and high heels against a pink background.

 

"Over the Rainbow," The Wizard of Oz.  Someone also already mentioned this song as well, but it is a song worth repeating.  One of the best all time movie songs and I would venture to say, one of the most memorable songs of all time.  Who can hear this song without thinking of sepia-toned Judy Garland in Kansas, singing a song about a trouble-free utopia.  

 

Aside from Judy...

 

I also love "Singin' in the Rain" which someone else already mentioned.  How can you not hear this song and instantly envision Gene Kelly dancing and singing in the rain with that big grin on his face?  This musical number and dance is one of the all-time great moments in film.

 

"White Christmas" from White Christmas.  Such a simple, beautiful Christmas song.  Only the Bing Crosby rendition will do.  I cannot handle the other versions.  This song, performed twice in the film, but to great effect in the finale with Bing, Danny Kaye, Vera-Ellen and Rosemary Clooney.  I love this song and the film.

 

Every time I hear any Bee-Gees song, I automatically think of Saturday Night Fever.  

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"One for My Baby (and One More for the Road)"

Ida Lupino's version from the Fox noir ROAD HOUSE is on YouTube (a four minute clip).

 

Just go to YouTube and type:

 

Road House (1948) - Ida Lupino - One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)
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I can't hear "Moanin' Low" without thinking of Clair Trevor singing it in KEY LARGO although it's in several other notable movies. Whenever I hear it, I resort to singing along in a drunken fashion.

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Judy Garland singing "I'm Nobody's Baby" from "Andy Hardy Meets Debutante".

 

Alice Faye singing "Shooting High" from "King of Burlesque" with Warner Baxter
 

The Man I Love by The Gershwins is sung by Ida Lupino and the film of the same name and the song is heard throughout the film.

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Whenever I hear Boccherini's Minuet, all I can think of is THE TIME OF THEIR LIVES

This piece is always a reminder of "The Lady Killers"  with Alec Guiness and Peter Sellers.   The piece was played each time the crooks met in their room as a ruse to the land lady to cover up their meetings.  In the end it was the landlady, who in the end was the receipient of the "lolly" as the thieves killed each other off. 

 

Two other great pieces are "We're In the Money" both the pig-latin and straight English version by Ginger Rogers and the lamenting lyrics of "Remember My Forgotten Man" sung by Joan Blondell.   This would be considered a very depressing song for a musical but somehow Busby Berkley choreographed it in such a way that ended up being a great finish and evocative of German expressionism in its filming.  According to history Busby was inspired by the 1932 Veteran's march on Washington D.C.  Hence the movement from WWI troops to the "Forgotten Man". 

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Judy Garland singing "I'm Nobody's Baby" from "Andy Hardy Meets Debutante".

 

Alice Faye singing "Shooting High" from "King of Burlesque" with Warner Baxter

 

The Man I Love by The Gershwins is sung by Ida Lupino and the film of the same name and the song is heard throughout the film.

Those ANDY HARDY movies would have been fairly dull without Judy Garland (and usually the ones she didn't appear in were quite dreadful).

 

As for Fox's resident song bird Alice Faye, I most enjoy her rendition of You'll Never Know from HELLO, FRISCO, HELLO.

 

Ida's a vastly underrated singer in my book. And I've opened my book to that page quite often.

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You're possibly not familiar with DEBUSSY'S "LA MER"  in order to link it to JACK LAWRENCE'S reworking of the CHARLES TRENET song of the same name as the Debussy orchestral work.

 

Lawrence wrote different lyrics and added the word "Beyond" to the title and made it a completely different tune.

 

And, although I know there have been MANY versions of this song recorded by many different people, BOBBY DARIN'S release to me, is the ONLY one worth the time!

 

Unless some particular tune was a "standout" in some particular movie, just hearing a song that was in some movie but had no significance to the story doesn't remind me of any certain film.

 

"Knock On Wood"?   Never heard this tune outside of whenever I watch CASABLANCA.  However, I HAVE heard "As Time Goes By" done by various people on other medium besides the movie over the years.  In fact, I was familiar with it before I ever SAW "Casablanca".

 

 

Sepiatone

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...As for Fox's resident song bird Alice Faye, I most enjoy her rendition of You'll Never Know from HELLO, FRISCO, HELLO.

 

 

You may not know this TB, but ironically this film has now been banned in the very city the story is set in.

 

(...'cause of course the locals now days absolutely HATE IT when anyone refers to their toney little town as just "Frisco"!!!)

 

LOL

 

;)

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I just love hearing Mozart’s TURKISH MARCH  (Rondo Alla Turca). This is the tune the lady played on the harpsichord during the fancy party at the home of newly-married Cathy, shortly after Heathcliff returned from America, in the film WUTHERING HEIGHTS.

 

This sequence in the film was so good because the director set it up in a way that we can see how Cathy, Heathcliff, and Isabella looked at each other while the tune was playing. It was a masterful and artistic mix of photography, editing, and acting only with their eyes and facial expressions.

 

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I agree TopBilled - Alice Faye's rendition of You'll Never Know is my favorite and the song was especially written for her by Harry Warren and Mack Gordon for Hello Frisco Hello. The song became one of the biggest hits during WWII. Alice Faye had a terrific range - she could reach high notes but had a voice that was so mellow that she could reach the deepest low octave ranges. I'm a big fan of Alice Faye and would love to see a TCM SOTM for her. The problem may be that her movies were made at 20th Century Fox and I don't think that TCM has optioned enough of them for a SOTM tribute to Miss Faye.

 

Anyway, La Mer is heard throughout the film Every Girl Should Be Married and Cary Grant continually whistles it throughout the film. Cary does the same thing with Oh Give Me Something To Remember  You By throughout "Mr. Lucky". Cary Grant is one of my favorite actors.

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One of the most famous movie/music identifications is the William Tell Overture and The Lone Ranger.

I cannot listen to the Overture without thinking of The Lone Ranger either.  I don't know if that is a positive or negative.  However between the movies and some great classical music cartoons I learned to love Wagner and others and I suppose the biggest influence was "Fantasia" and when they play the "Sorcerer's Apprentice" all I visualize is Mickey and multiplying broomsticks.   Oh yes..don't forget "A Night on Bald Mountain"  another classical music piece in a classical cartoon.

 

One other obscure song that always plays in my mind...is "Farewell Amanda"  from "Adam's Rib".  If you remember David Wayne, who has a crush on Katherine Hepburn composes the ditty and plays it at a cocktail party.   Frank Sinatra recorded it and that is the version you hear in the scene where Spencer Tracey is listening to the radio.  Apparently Sinatra recorded it but the recordings have never been found.  It is a Cole Porter song.

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