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Favorite Movies for Travelling


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There she blows. You know what the three most exciting sounds in the world are?

Anchor chains, plane motors and train whistles.

     -paraphrasing It's a Wonderful Life.

 

Ironically, very little travel happens in IAWL.  Other characters travel, but not George and Mary Bailey.

 

My favorites, the ones that really inspire me to travel to their real location are:

  1. Amelie (Paris)
  2. Funny Face (Paris)
  3. Summertime (Venice)
  4. Much Ado About Nothing (Tuscany)
  5. Enchanted April (Italy)
  6. 3 Coins in the Fountain (Rome)
  7. Roman Holiday (Rome)
  8. The Quiet Man (Ireland)
  9. Local Hero (Scotland)
  10. 4 Weddings and a Funeral (London)
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Great topic Casa! It combines two of my favorite things: movies and daydreaming about traveling.  Lol.

 

1. Funny Face (Paris)

2. Under the Tuscan Sun (Tuscany)

3. Roman Holiday (Rome)

4. An American in Paris (Paris)

5. To Catch a Thief (French Riviera) 

6. Love Actually (London)

7. Crocodile Dundee (Australia)

8. The Sun Also Rises (Paris & Spain)

9. A Very Brady Sequel (Hawaii)

10. The Quiet Man (Ireland)

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I like films that take place in Latin America, especially "quest for gold" type films showing the old Inca, Mayan, and Aztec ruins, and filmed on location. I love CAPTAIN FROM CASTILE, and especially with that real erupting volcano in the distant background.

 

Most people don't realize it, but the very last scene of the film shows the Spanish explorers marching toward Tenochtitlan, the Aztec's main city, located on an island in Lake Texcoco.

 

Also, most people don't realize that the Spanish called the Aztecs "Mexica" Indians, and that city on the island is ALL that Cortez and his men conquered... a total of about 5 square miles. So the real total of Cortez's "Conquest of Mexico" amounted not to the entire country that we know today, but only that 5 square miles of the city. Since the defeat of the Aztec leaders liberated all their slaves and the various other tribes that the Aztecs ruled, the defeat of that city liberated all those other Indians and all the countryside for hundreds of miles around. Because of this liberation of all that un-named land was due to the conquest of those 5 square miles, the term "The Conquest of Mexico" gradually came to mean the conquest of all the territory that we know of today as Mexico.

 

I've been at the center of that old Aztec city. It is still in downtown Mexico City, but most of it and its old pyramids are buried now as the massive structures were gradually taken apart by the Spanish so their stones could be used for new Spanish buildings, while some of the pyramids simply sank below ground level over a long period of time, since the island was made up of a lot of soft land-fill type dirt due to the surrounding lake.

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I've been very lucky that I've gotten to travel to some of those places. I was on a cruise in the Mediterranean last September and when we got to Ville Franche near Nice, France, I commented that it looked like it does in the movies. Except a heck of a lot more traffic. I love France. It's all beautiful. Germany too.

 

An Affair to Remember goes to that part of the French Riviera. So does It Takes A Thief.

 

I recently watched Lisa starring Stephen Boyd & Dolores Hart where the story starts in Amsterdam. It still looks like it does in the film, at least the city itself.

 

I also watched a Douglas Fairbanks Sr. Film A Modern Musketeer where he travels to the Grand Canyon, my favorite place on earth. The characters were staying at the El Tovar Hotel, which is still there and hasn't changed much. There's just a lot more stuff there. And roads.

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I've been very lucky that I've gotten to travel to some of those places. I was on a cruise in the Mediterranean last September and when we got to Ville Franche near Nice, France, I commented that it looked like it does in the movies. Except a heck of a lot more traffic. I love France. It's all beautiful. Germany too.

 

An Affair to Remember goes to that part of the French Riviera. So does It Takes A Thief.

 

I recently watched Lisa starring Stephen Boyd & Dolores Hart where the story starts in Amsterdam. It still looks like it does in the film, at least the city itself.

 

I also watched a Douglas Fairbanks Sr. Film A Modern Musketeer where he travels to the Grand Canyon, my favorite place on earth. The characters were staying at the El Tovar Hotel, which is still there and hasn't changed much. There's just a lot more stuff there. And roads.

 

Your post made me think of 3 more.

  1. Sun Valley Serenade (Sun Valley/Ketchem ID)
  2. Grand Canyon (1992?)  - end credits (Grand Canyon)
  3. The Theory of Everything (UK and Cambridge)
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Many movies have inspired my travelling expeditions, among some of my favourites are:

 

"The Pained Veil"   travelling in China

"The Motorcycle Diaries", travelling in South America

"Murder on the Nile", travelling in Egypt

"War and Peace", travelling in Russia

"Love in the Afternoon", enjoying the sights of Paris

"Topaki" persuing the jewels of Turkey and Istanbul

"Roman Holiday"  where else but Rome

"Casablanca" travelling in Morroco without letters of transit

 

I belong to a travelling club and when my presentation time was alotted I chose to take the group on trips through the movies which they throroughly enjoyed and the above includes only a smattering of movies filmed across the world and inspired many of us to travel.   

 

 

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I think it's nice(and somehow not believable) that all y'all were able to travel to ALL those exotic places you've seen in movies.  Makes me wonder when you found the time to WATCH those movies....

 

The one sort of time I travelled to somewhere that was the location of a MOVIE that I liked was when I went to TORONTO, and saw the EATON Centre and bank that was central to the 1978 movie "The Silent Partner" with Eliot Gould and Christopher Plummer.  A favorite of mine.

 

But, the movie really didn't inspire nor incite me to travel to Toronto.  Friends of mine who visited there suggested it.

 

But, I somehow thought this would be a thread concerning MOVIES in which travelling played a huge role in either the plot or theme.

 

Like NORTH BY NORTHWEST, in which much train travelling is done.  Or, THE LADY EVE--luxury liner travel

 

A NIGHT AT THE OPERA, also ship travel

 

IT HAPPENED ONE NIGHT--thumb and bus

 

THE GRAPES OF WRATH--in on a technicality  ;)

 

THE LONG, LONG TRAILER

 

You know...THAT kind of thing!

 

 

Sepiatone

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I think it's nice(and somehow not believable) that all y'all were able to travel to ALL those exotic places you've seen in movies.  Makes me wonder when you found the time to WATCH those movies....

 

The one sort of time I travelled to somewhere that was the location of a MOVIE that I liked was when I went to TORONTO, and saw the EATON Centre and bank that was central to the 1978 movie "The Silent Partner" with Eliot Gould and Christopher Plummer.  A favorite of mine.

 

 

Sepiatone

I guess you mean Elliott Gould with two t's.

:)

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I think it's nice(and somehow not believable) that all y'all were able to travel to ALL those exotic places you've seen in movies.  Makes me wonder when you found the time to WATCH those movies....

 

 

Just to clarify my post, I haven't actually been to any of the places I listed.  I interpreted Casa's thread as movies that inspired me to want to visit these places.  

 

Of films that do feature places that I've been to, they're much less glamorous:

 

North by Northwest, Mt. Rushmore, SD

 

Vertigo, Dark Passage, Woman on the Run (all the other SF noirs), San Francisco, CA

 

Fargo, Fargo, ND

 

I've always wanted to visit Bodega Bay, CA because of The Birds, but I haven't been there yet.

 

That's the beauty of the movies, they can take you all over the world.  If I can't actually travel to the French Riviera that specific day, then I may as well watch a movie that takes place there and pretend, right? Lol.

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Char mentioned the David Lean directed movie SUMMERTIME in her opening post, and which always reminds me of how much I was struck by Lean's ability to capture the special and unique beauty and "feel" of that Italian city after I caught this film on TCM just a week or so after my wife and I had returned from a trip there back in the mid-1990s.

 

It is said on any given day there are more tourists than there are actual residents of Venice and which seemed true, however if you venture off the Piazza San Marco and the Grand Canal(which are where most tourists seem to congregate) and then walk along some of the smaller canals and cross over some of the smaller bridges over those smaller canals, you can find yourself removed from most all of the other tourists and begin to really get the feel of the place and its unique beauty.

 

(...that is where we found a little bistro and indulged ourselves with a bottle of Chianti and two orders of some of the best seafood antipasto I have ever tasted...what a wonderfully memorable day)

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Just to clarify my post, I haven't actually been to any of the places I listed.  I interpreted Casa's thread as movies that inspired me to want to visit these places.  

 

Of films that do feature places that I've been to, they're much less glamorous:

 

North by Northwest, Mt. Rushmore, SD

 

Vertigo, Dark Passage, Woman on the Run (all the other SF noirs), San Francisco, CA

 

Fargo, Fargo, ND

 

I've always wanted to visit Bodega Bay, CA because of The Birds, but I haven't been there yet.

 

That's the beauty of the movies, they can take you all over the world.  If I can't actually travel to the French Riviera that specific day, then I may as well watch a movie that takes place there and pretend, right? Lol.

 

You had it figured out right, Speedy. I was hoping for lists of movies that inspire to travel, not an actual list of compiled destinations.  Armchair travelers are welcome here.

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Char mentioned the David Lean directed movie SUMMERTIME in her opening post, and which always reminds me of how much I was struck by Lean's ability to capture the special and unique beauty and "feel" of that Italian city after I caught this film on TCM just a week or so after my wife and I had returned from a trip there back in the mid-1990s.

 

It is said on any given day there are more tourists than there are actual residents of Venice and which seemed true, however if you venture off the Piazza San Marco and the Grand Canal(which are where most tourists seem to congregate) and then walk along some of the smaller canals and cross over some of the smaller bridges over those smaller canals, you can find yourself removed from most all of the other tourists and begin to really get the feel of the place and its unique beauty.

 

(...that is where we found a little bistro and indulged ourselves with a bottle of Chianti and two orders of some of the best seafood antipasto I have ever tasted...what a wonderfully memorable day)

 

I will get to Venice someday, and I appreciate the travel tips you've given here. Thank you!  Makes a lot of sense. 

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This isn't a specific location persay, but my favorite movie, The Long Long Trailer makes me want to buy a trailer and go on a romantic road trip with my husband and see the sights.  Though, I'd probably be more apt to go the Airstream route rather than the New Moon that Lucy and Desi purchase.

 

They go halfway across the country, from Southern California to Colorado.  They see the sights in between and enjoy (for the most part) their new life together.  One of the best ways to get to know someone is to spend hours in the car traveling with them.  

 

Lucy and Desi have so many adventures together on their roadtrip that it always makes me want to hop in the car and head off to somewhere.  Road Trips might be one of the most quintessentially American vacations during the car era of the 1940s-1960s.  

 

My husband and I actually did some of Lucy and Desi's same road trip, except we only traveled from Oregon to Southern California.  However, we did one of the classic American roadtrips: California's famed Pacific Coast Highway (Highway 1), traveled down through San Simeon through Santa Barbara and onward to Anaheim.  We stayed in Anaheim for a few days, went down to San Diego/Coronado over night, traveled up to Los Angeles and stayed for a couple days.  We then headed up to Yosemite Nat'l Park (where Lucy and Desi are seen traveling past El Capitan and Half Dome) and then back home to Portland.  

 

When I was growing up we road tripped it to Minnesota from Oregon every couple years or so to visit my relatives in Minnesota.  I've done the route through Washington, Idaho panhandle, Montana, North Dakota and then on the way home... South Dakota, Wyoming, Idaho and back to Western Oregon many many times.  

 

The road trip is truly one of the most classic ways to travel and I love films that also feature these road trips through various locations.  Road Trips aren't limited to the United States either.  

 

Anyway.  I'm not trying to derail the thread.  What I was trying to say in a verbose manner was that many films that feature road trips make me want to embark on the same trip (or a similar one) and try to recreate the same trip.

 

One of my bucket list road trips is to try and travel the original Route 66, even though I understand that much of the road is in poor shape (or maybe even gone!).  

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I love THE QUIET MAN and whenever I see it, just can't wait to see Ireland. The scenery is great yes, but I want to hang around with the PEOPLE.

 

Whenever I see SOME LIKE IT HOT, I want to revisit Coronado Beach. I had been there as a kid, way before seeing the movie.

 

I watch Bollywood films a lot and want to visit rural India. Much seems to be farm land and gorgeous mountains, nothing like big dirty cities.

 

In a reverse note....I travel a lot within the US. Whenever I know we'll be traveling, I check out movies that were filmed there so I can pose "on location"

 

So far I've had pictures taken at the mansion from THE FISHER KING, the asylum from 12 MONKEYS, the hotel from THE SHINING, the crime scene in MATEWAN, the stained glass staircase in 6TH SENSE, Jean Simmon's house in HOME BEFORE DARK and Mr Tiki in B. Pusser's house holding his "big stick" from WALKING TALL. (no dirty comments please)

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Yesterday, Today And Tomorrow - Vittorio De Sica's wonderful trilogy starring Sophia Loren and Marcello Mastrianni - Features Rome, Milan and Naples

 

A Brief Vacation - De Sica again - starring Florinda Balkan features the beautiful Italian Alps during the winter

 

Fanny - Marseille looks absolutely wonderful in this film adaptation of the Broadway musical sans music except for the theme "Fanny" running throughout the film.

 

The Sound of Music - Saltzburg, Austria - Robert Wise's direction and the cinematography is absolutely magnificent and the mountains and scenery are exquisite.

 

Bullitt, I Remember Mama, Dark Passage, D.O.A. (1950), The Bigamist, The Woman in Red, Vertigo, Blue Jasmine -- Wonderful locations of San Francisco

 

Georgy Girl, A Touch of Class, To Sir With Love, Night And The City, Alfie, Match Point, Nottinghill, and Sherlock, the fabulous PBS Masterpiece Mystery series -- London looks so wonderful

 

Priscilla, Queen of the Desert, Muriel's Wedding, My Brilliant Career, The Boys Are Back, and Australia - I've always wanted to see Australia

 

Midnight in Paris, Charade, Bob Le Flambeur, Breathless, Gigi, Something's Gotta Give - Paris is truly magnificent

 

Manhattan, Hannah And Her Sisters, Manhattan Murder Mystery, Radio Days, Crimes And Misdemeanors, Annie Hall -- New York City and environs via Woody Allen. Hannah And Her Sisters virtually takes you on a tour of Manhattan's most beautiful buildings and skyscrapers, as does the opening sequence in Manhattan with Gershwin's Rhaphsody In Blue. NYC never looked so majestic as in Woody's films.

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I guess you mean Elliott Gould with two t's.

:)

Yeah.  My mistake.

 

I guess I usually spell that name the same as the LAST name of long ago and longtime and much beloved Detroit weatherman SONNY ELIOT (WITH only one "T".), who I grew up watching on TV.

 

Movies really don't inspire me to travel.  I do see many places I think would be nice to visit, but none have caused me to jump out of my chair and run to the travel agent.

 

In fact, I at first worried(and the thread title sort of did unwittingly suggest it) that this thread might be about...and since the advent of "in-dash" DVD players, movies that might be good to watch WHILE travelling.  NOT a good idea.

 

But I say that only because a nephew of mine had one of those players in the dash of HIS car once, and wound up wrapping his car around a lampost while watching "The Green Mile".

 

However, I still think listing movies in which travelling plays a large part of the story is a good idea.

 

And besides, the inspire to travel thing all depends on when the movie was made.....

 

Due to watching movies, I was disappointed when...

 

Finally getting to New York City and discovering JACK DEMPSEY'S restaraunt was no more.

 

Along with the AUTOMAT.

 

And a few other "landmarks" I'd have loved to have seen while there.  :(

 

 

Sepiatone

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Along with the AUTOMAT.

 

The very last Automat was saved and beautifully preserved. It now serves guests in the New York State Museum in Albany. (where there is also an extensive exhibit for the 9/11 disaster including parts of the building and dog rescue statue)

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Along with the AUTOMAT.

 

The very last Automat was saved and beautifully preserved. It now serves guests in the New York State Museum in Albany. (where there is also an extensive exhibit for the 9/11 disaster including parts of the building and dog rescue statue)

 

ALBANY?

 

Yeah, like I often DREAM of heading there!  :wacko:

 

So, you're basically telling me I'm SOL as far as ever seeing an Automat.  Right?

 

 

Sepiatone

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