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Ann Blyth


drednm
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I remember her as the spokeswoman for Hostess Twinkies back in the 70s.  She had her priorities straight and the result was a happy marriage and five seemingly well adjusted-children who avoided the usual scandal-plagued Hollywood childhoods. That she was treated he same way as Ava Gardner was in Showboat - both ladies should have been allowed to sing for themselves - is shocking.  Thankfully we have a treasure of her film and TV work to prove her talent as a singer and actress.  And she's still with us.   

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Have always enjoyed Ann Blyth and have requested TCM air more of her movies - in particular:

 

Once More My Darling (1949) - Delightful comedy co-starring Robert Montgomery

 

Mr. Peabody And The Mermaid (1948) Love this film starring Miss Blyth and William Powell

 

A Woman's Vengeance (1948) Blythe co-stars with the great Charles Boyer and rare film appearance of Jessica Tandy. Both Charles Boyer and Blyth co-starred in the Lux Radio Theatre presentation.

 

The World In His Arms - (1952) Co-starring Gregory Peck

 

Have requested Once More My Darling and The World In His Arms - Hope TCM will air sometime soon.

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I haven't seen Ann Blyth in too many films (but would like to), but I really enjoyed what is probably her most memorable role--Veda in Mildred Pierce.  I thought Blyth was just as good as Crawford in this film.  She was excellent as the nasty, vindictive, spoiled daughter of Crawford.  I loved her character even though Veda was an awful person.

 

It looks like The Student Prince will be airing on Nov 8 and The Helen Morgan Story on January 26.  I love torch singers, so I'll definitely be checking out 'Helen Morgan.' 

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I haven't seen Ann Blyth in too many films (but would like to), but I really enjoyed what is probably her most memorable role--Veda in Mildred Pierce.  I thought Blyth was just as good as Crawford in this film.  She was excellent as the nasty, vindictive, spoiled daughter of Crawford.  I loved her character even though Veda was an awful person.

 

It looks like The Student Prince will be airing on Nov 8 and The Helen Morgan Story on January 26.  I love torch singers, so I'll definitely be checking out 'Helen Morgan.' 

 

 

 

A truly remarkable performance from a 16-year-old actress with ony 4 fluff movies and a Broadway play under her belt.

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Have always enjoyed Ann Blyth and have requested TCM air more of her movies - in particular:

 

Once More My Darling (1949) - Delightful comedy co-starring Robert Montgomery

 

Mr. Peabody And The Mermaid (1948) Love this film starring Miss Blyth and William Powell

 

A Woman's Vengeance (1948) Blythe co-stars with the great Charles Boyer and rare film appearance of Jessica Tandy. Both Charles Boyer and Blyth co-starred in the Lux Radio Theatre presentation.

 

The World In His Arms - (1952) Co-starring Gregory Peck

 

Have requested Once More My Darling and The World In His Arms - Hope TCM will air sometime soon.

Once More, My Darling is a charming movie, and Ann Blyth is very funny in it.

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MR PEABODY & THE MERMAID has shown several times on TCM. Some viewings I've enjoyed it, while others it fell flat.

(wonder why?)

 

But agreed, Blyth always gives an outstanding performance and my favorite is also Veda in Mildred Pierce. I love how she smiles with delight when she says something particularly nasty and mean to her mother!

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Ann Blyth has a lovely soprano voice  which is showcased in three movies of varying quality:

 

"The Student Prince" (1953)--Ann Blyth and Edmond Purdom lip-synching to Mario Lanza's voice.

 

"Rose-Marie" (1954)--Ann Blyth, Howard Keel, & Fernando Lamas (a baritone), in one of the last movies choreographed by Busby Berkeley.

 

"Kismet" (1955)--Ann Blyth's, Howard Keel's, & Dolores Grey's singing carries the film despite director Vincente Minnelli's disinterest (he was busy planning his next film,  1956's"Lust For Life".  MGM had told him he directed Kismet, or no LFL.  One thinks Minnelli actively tried to sabotage "Kismet".  Just one minor example; Blyth is required to warble "Baubles, Bangles, and Beads" while looking rapturously at some nauseating green fabrics.). The music & choreoography (sp?) saves the film.

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Blyth starred in a good episode of The Twilight Zone from the last season called "Queen of the Nile", about an actress who is mysterious about her age.  The ep is a bit of a copy of the earlier "Long Live Walter Jameson", but aside from that, she was good in it as an elegant woman with a surprising past.  :)

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Ann Blyth has a lovely soprano voice  which is showcased in three movies of varying quality:

 

"The Student Prince" (1953)--Ann Blyth and Edmond Purdom lip-synching to Mario Lanza's voice.

 

"Rose-Marie" (1954)--Ann Blyth, Howard Keel, & Fernando Lamas (a baritone), in one of the last movies choreographed by Busby Berkeley.

 

"Kismet" (1955)--Ann Blyth's, Howard Keel's, & Dolores Grey's singing carries the film despite director Vincente Minnelli's disinterest (he was busy planning his next film,  1956's"Lust For Life".  MGM had told him he directed Kismet, or no LFL.  One thinks Minnelli actively tried to sabotage "Kismet".  Just one minor example; Blyth is required to warble "Baubles, Bangles, and Beads" while looking rapturously at some nauseating green fabrics.). The music & choreoography (sp?) saves the film.

 

 

The thing about Kismet is that there are so many familiar songs in it ... for those of us who were kids in the 1950s. Beautiful music, with the highlight being Dolores Gray belting out "Bagdad." Ann Blyth is very good and sings 3 of the hits songs.

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  • 8 months later...

The movie that never was...........

 

06B1H.jpg

 

Interestingly, Deanna Durbin's first husband, Vaughn Paul, was assigned to produce MERMAID IN DISTRESS for Universal's 1941 season.  The picture never got off the ground and the stars, Robert Cummings and Priscilla Lane, were then assigned to the Skirball unit for SABOTEUR.  in 1945 the novel Peabody's Mermaid appeared.  Universal then made the picture in 1948.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Besides the other ones mentioned, and yes, she's fantastic in "Mildred Pierce,"  I happened to catch her in a little known film called,  "Our Very Own." She stars as the eldest daughter in a  perfect little "Father Knows Best," family she even has Jane Wyatt for her mother. Then, at the worst possible moment, her jealous  sister tells her she's adopted. 

 

This doesn't sound like much of a story but Ann plays it so well, your heart just breaks for her.  Seeing this after "Mildred Pierce,"  just demonstrates what a huge range she has.

 

I'm also always fascinated with her face.  She has such an unusual sort of beauty.  Her small piquant face next to Joan Crawford's big striking one is part of what made their scenes together so mesmerizing.

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Besides the other ones mentioned, and yes, she's fantastic in "Mildred Pierce,"  I happened to catch her in a little known film called,  "Our Very Own." She stars as the eldest daughter in a  perfect little "Father Knows Best," family she even has Jane Wyatt for her mother. Then, at the worst possible moment, her jealous  sister tells her she's adopted. 

 

This doesn't sound like much of a story but Ann plays it so well, your heart just breaks for her.  Seeing this after "Mildred Pierce,"  just demonstrates what a huge range she has.

 

I'm also always fascinated with her face.  She has such an unusual sort of beauty.  Her small piquant face next to Joan Crawford's big striking one is part of what made their scenes together so mesmerizing.

 

Our Very Own is a nice movie that doesn't drown itself in too much feeling.    Sometimes the Ann character comes off as a brat but that is to be expected given the trauma she faced.    The film also has Ann Dvorak as her birth mother.  While she doesn't get a lot of screen time she makes the most of it.     Natalie Wood plays the youngest daughter (but not the trouble making one). 

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Besides the other ones mentioned, and yes, she's fantastic in "Mildred Pierce,"  I happened to catch her in a little known film called,  "Our Very Own." She stars as the eldest daughter in a  perfect little "Father Knows Best," family she even has Jane Wyatt for her mother. Then, at the worst possible moment, her jealous  sister tells her she's adopted. 

 

This doesn't sound like much of a story but Ann plays it so well, your heart just breaks for her.  Seeing this after "Mildred Pierce,"  just demonstrates what a huge range she has.

 

I'm also always fascinated with her face.  She has such an unusual sort of beauty.  Her small piquant face next to Joan Crawford's big striking one is part of what made their scenes together so mesmerizing.

 

I remember catching OUR VERY OWN for the first time as a teenager and back in the late-'60s and on some local L.A. station matinee movie.

 

Now, being adopted while an infant myself, but fortunately in MY case and contrary to Ann's character, learning of this as one of my very first childhood memories and with it being presented to me in such a manner as it being somewhat "a badge of honor" to have been so, I remember thinking while watching that movie back then what a damn ungrateful and pretty much unsympathetic BRAT Ann's character was after she learned of her adoption and during her teenage years, and I THINK I remember yelling at the TV while watching it, "OH, GROW UP, YOU DUMB CHICK! DON'T YOU KNOW HOW LUCKY YOU ARE TO HAVE THOSE TWO LOVING PARENTS OF YOURS?!"

 

(...the term "chick" of course at THAT time being somewhat socially acceptable in mixed company)

 

LOL

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