Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Golden age: Roll call


Recommended Posts

screen-shot-2017-02-10-at-1-30-29-am.png

 

Vera Ralston was the queen of Republic Pictures. She signed with the studio in 1943, shortly after she emigrated to America. She was a figure skater who had represented her native country, Czechoslovakia, in the Olympics during the late 1930s. At one point, her skills on the ice had impressed Adolf Hitler so much he offered her a chance to skate for Nazi Germany. She promptly turned him down.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-49-11-pm.pn


With war raging in Europe, she and her mother came to America. She worked in ice shows and began to learn English. She also applied to become a naturalized citizen of the U.S., a process which was completed after the war, just as she was becoming a star at Republic. Initially, the studio cast her in ice skating musicals. Following a short apprenticeship, she was promoted to lead billing in 1944’s LAKE PLACID SERENADE. She was then cast in a science fiction horror film with Erich Von Stroheim. Some critics complained about her acting but she would soon improve and become more natural on camera.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-51-55-pm.pn


Guiding her career at Republic was boss Herbert Yates who fell in love with her off-camera. They wouldn’t marry until 1952, but in the meantime, Yates pulled out all the stops. Vera’s films were all ‘A’ pictures, with the best budgets and costars. She worked with Von Stroheim twice; with John Wayne twice; with John Carroll and David Brian multiple times; and she was even in a picture with Fred MacMurray. Vera later told a documentary crew that her favorite picture was I, JANE DOE– but she’s more known for the westerns she made in the late 40s and 50s. Probably the best of these is JUBILEE TRAIL in which she costarred with Joan Leslie; and THE FIGHTING KENTUCKIAN with Duke.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-55-35-pm.pn


When Republic closed in the late 50s, Vera’s motion picture career ended. She was one of the few actresses in Hollywood whose entire movie career was at just one studio. She was never loaned out to other companies; and after her film days were over, she did not take on any television roles. She retired to a quiet life with Yates. After his death Vera moved away from Hollywood and remarried. When documentary filmmakers knocked on her door, she was willing to discuss her cinematic career, but she possessed the knowledge that it did not totally define her.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-59-25-pm1.p

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. lake placid serenade (1944); republic; musical; eugene pallette; 85 mins.
  2. the lady and the monster (1944); republic; science fiction horror; erich von stroheim; 86 mins.
  3. wyoming (1947); republic; western; bill elliott; 84 mins.
  4. i, jane doe (1948); republic; war drama; ruth hussey; 85 mins.
  5. the fighting kentuckian (1949); republic; western; john wayne; 100 mins.
  6. belle le grand (1951); republic; western; john carroll; 90 mins.
  7. a fair wind to java (1953); republic; adventure; fred macmurray; 92 mins.
  8. jubilee trail (1954); republic; western; joan leslie; 103 mins.
  9. timberjack (1955); republic; musical western; sterling hayden; 94 mins.
  10. accused of murder (1956); republic; crime drama; david brian; 74 mins.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-02-10-at-1-30-29-am.png

 

Vera Ralston was the queen of Republic Pictures. She signed with the studio in 1943, shortly after she emigrated to America. She was a figure skater who had represented her native country, Czechoslovakia, in the Olympics during the late 1930s. At one point, her skills on the ice had impressed Adolf Hitler so much he offered her a chance to skate for Nazi Germany. She promptly turned him down.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-49-11-pm.pn

With war raging in Europe, she and her mother came to America. She worked in ice shows and began to learn English. She also applied to become a naturalized citizen of the U.S., a process which was completed after the war, just as she was becoming a star at Republic. Initially, the studio cast her in ice skating musicals. Following a short apprenticeship, she was promoted to lead billing in 1944’s LAKE PLACID SERENADE. She was then cast in a science fiction horror film with Erich Von Stroheim. Some critics complained about her acting but she would soon improve and become more natural on camera.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-51-55-pm.pn

Guiding her career at Republic was boss Herbert Yates who fell in love with her off-camera. They wouldn’t marry until 1952, but in the meantime, Yates pulled out all the stops. Vera’s films were all ‘A’ pictures, with the best budgets and costars. She worked with Von Stroheim twice; with John Wayne twice; with John Carroll and David Brian multiple times; and she was even in a picture with Fred MacMurray. Vera later told a documentary crew that her favorite picture was I, JANE DOE– but she’s more known for the westerns she made in the late 40s and 50s. Probably the best of these is JUBILEE TRAIL in which she costarred with Joan Leslie; and THE FIGHTING KENTUCKIAN with Duke.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-55-35-pm.pn

When Republic closed in the late 50s, Vera’s motion picture career ended. She was one of the few actresses in Hollywood whose entire movie career was at just one studio. She was never loaned out to other companies; and after her film days were over, she did not take on any television roles. She retired to a quiet life with Yates. After his death Vera moved away from Hollywood and remarried. When documentary filmmakers knocked on her door, she was willing to discuss her cinematic career, but she possessed the knowledge that it did not totally define her.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-59-25-pm1.p

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. lake placid serenade (1944); republic; musical; eugene pallette; 85 mins.
  2. the lady and the monster (1944); republic; science fiction horror; erich von stroheim; 86 mins.
  3. wyoming (1947); republic; western; bill elliott; 84 mins.
  4. i, jane doe (1948); republic; war drama; ruth hussey; 85 mins.
  5. the fighting kentuckian (1949); republic; western; john wayne; 100 mins.
  6. belle le grand (1951); republic; western; john carroll; 90 mins.
  7. a fair wind to java (1953); republic; adventure; fred macmurray; 92 mins.
  8. jubilee trail (1954); republic; western; joan leslie; 103 mins.
  9. timberjack (1955); republic; musical western; sterling hayden; 94 mins.
  10. accused of murder (1956); republic; crime drama; david brian; 74 mins.

 

I would love to see her and Fred MacMurray in "A Fair Wind To Java".

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love to see her and Fred MacMurray in "A Fair Wind To Java".

 

It's a great one-- a perfect matinee adventure crowd-pleaser. Martin Scorsese has written enthusiastically about it. He aided in the film's restoration. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the Fred Allen profile.  My grandmother spoke of him all the time and how much she loved his radio show.  I knew nothing about him before this except for the "feud" with Jack Benny.  I'll look him up on Wiki or Imbd. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the Fred Allen profile.  My grandmother spoke of him all the time and how much she loved his radio show.  I knew nothing about him before this except for the "feud" with Jack Benny.  I'll look him up on Wiki or Imbd. 

 

You are most welcome. He only made a handful of films. And he was not a fan of television. So if you can find his old-time radio shows, you will hear him in his element.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-02-11-at-9-07-15-am.png

 

One of Republic’s most versatile leading men was Robert Livingston. He started at the studio in 1936 having already worked at Universal, Fox and MGM– usually in bit parts. For a short time, MGM tried him in romantic roles, but that didn’t pan out. When he signed with Republic he found his niche.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-36-49-pm.pn


Originally Republic cast him in serials. He had the lead in THE VIGILANTES ARE COMING, which proved to be a hit with audiences. Soon afterward, Bob was given his most famous role as Stony Brooke in THE THREE MESQUITEERS. The franchise proved to be hugely successful and numerous sequels were made. While the three main characters were played by a variety of performers, Bob was very identified with these B westerns– he made 29 of them, more than anyone else on the lot.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-37-29-pm.pn


Meanwhile, Republic put Bob in another serial. This time he played Zorro in THE BOLD CABALLERO. And when he was done as Zorro, he went on to portray the title role in THE LONE RANGER RIDES AGAIN. Chief Thundercloud played alongside him as Tonto. Fifteen years later, Bob would guest star on the long-running TV version of the Lone Ranger. He appeared twice on the show.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-39-36-pm.pn


When he was not busy as a Mesquiteer or starring in serials, Republic created another series to showcase his talents– the Lone Rider. There were also assignments in modestly budgeted comedies as well as horror films during the 1940s. To say Republic kept him busy would be an understatement. After the war he was still in demand and played supporting roles in films alongside pals Roy Rogers and Gene Autry. In the 1980s, shortly before Bob passed away, Gene presented him with a special award honoring cowboy stars.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-40-10-pm.pn

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the three mesquiteers (1936); republic; western; ray corrigan; 67 mins.
  2. the bold caballero (1936); republic; adventure; heather angel; 67 mins.
  3. larceny on the air (1937); republic; crime; grace bradley; 67 mins.
  4. arson gang busters (1938); republic; action; rosalind keith; 65 mins.
  5. orphans of the street (1938); republic; comedy-drama; tommy ryan; 61 mins.
  6. pistol packin’ mama (1943); republic; crime comedy; ruth terry; 64 mins.
  7. the laramie trail (1944); republic; western; smiley burnette; 55 mins.
  8. goodnight, sweetheart (1944); republic; musical comedy; ruth terry; 67 mins.
  9. undercover woman (1946); republic; mystery comedy; stephanie bachelor; 56 mins.
  10. valley of the zombies (1946); republic; horror; adrian booth brian; 56 mins.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-02-11-at-9-07-15-am.png

 

One of Republic’s most versatile leading men was Robert Livingston. He started at the studio in 1936 having already worked at Universal, Fox and MGM– usually in bit parts. For a short time, MGM tried him in romantic roles, but that didn’t pan out. When he signed with Republic he found his niche.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-36-49-pm.pn

Originally Republic cast him in serials. He had the lead in THE VIGILANTES ARE COMING, which proved to be a hit with audiences. Soon afterward, Bob was given his most famous role as Stony Brooke in THE THREE MESQUITEERS. The franchise proved to be hugely successful and numerous sequels were made. While the three main characters were played by a variety of performers, Bob was very identified with these B westerns– he made 29 of them, more than anyone else on the lot.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-37-29-pm.pn

Meanwhile, Republic put Bob in another serial. This time he played Zorro in THE BOLD CABALLERO. And when he was done as Zorro, he went on to portray the title role in THE LONE RANGER RIDES AGAIN. Chief Thundercloud played alongside him as Tonto. Fifteen years later, Bob would guest star on the long-running TV version of the Lone Ranger. He appeared twice on the show.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-39-36-pm.pn

When he was not busy as a Mesquiteer or starring in serials, Republic created another series to showcase his talents– the Lone Rider. There were also assignments in modestly budgeted comedies as well as horror films during the 1940s. To say Republic kept him busy would be an understatement. After the war he was still in demand and played supporting roles in films alongside pals Roy Rogers and Gene Autry. In the 1980s, shortly before Bob passed away, Gene presented him with a special award honoring cowboy stars.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-12-40-10-pm.pn

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the three mesquiteers (1936); republic; western; ray corrigan; 67 mins.
  2. the bold caballero (1936); republic; adventure; heather angel; 67 mins.
  3. larceny on the air (1937); republic; crime; grace bradley; 67 mins.
  4. arson gang busters (1938); republic; action; rosalind keith; 65 mins.
  5. orphans of the street (1938); republic; comedy-drama; tommy ryan; 61 mins.
  6. pistol packin’ mama (1943); republic; crime comedy; ruth terry; 64 mins.
  7. the laramie trail (1944); republic; western; smiley burnette; 55 mins.
  8. goodnight, sweetheart (1944); republic; musical comedy; ruth terry; 67 mins.
  9. undercover woman (1946); republic; mystery comedy; stephanie bachelor; 56 mins.
  10. valley of the zombies (1946); republic; horror; adrian booth brian; 56 mins.

 

He was such a dream.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-02-12-at-8-20-48-am.png

 

Gorgeous Adele Mara was born into a Spanish family. When she went to Hollywood in the early 1940s, she was put under contract at Columbia pictures. She had bit parts and small supporting roles. One of these was in a Rita Hayworth musical where she played the star’s younger sister. The studio also put her in a Three Stooges short.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-9-06-26-pm.png


By early 1944, she had become a popular pin-up girl and switched studios. She was now signed with Republic, and for the next seven years she would be very busy. She made a total of 41 motion pictures at Republic. By the end of her first year, she was top-billed in B suspense films. They also cast her in B westerns and in horror films. She seemed to work in almost every genre, and she always had strong chemistry with her male costars.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-9-06-54-pm.png


Her most frequent leading men during this time were John Carroll, Forrest Tucker and John Wayne. Tucker called her a joy to work with when he was interviewed about her many years later. He said she was well-respected and claimed she was like velvet compared to other leading ladies. Tucker primarily made westerns with her, and they both were featured in SANDS OF IWO JIMA with John Wayne.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-9-08-01-pm.png


Near the end of her contract at Republic, Adele was starring in ‘A’ pictures and she was also in the process of getting married. She wed writer-producer Roy Huggins, and it would be a union that lasted fifty years until his death. She had three sons with Huggins and cut back on her workload. She was still making films as a freelancer in the mid-to-late 50s, but after 1959, she worked exclusively in television. She guest-starred every season on her husband’s program Maverick. 
 

screen-shot-2017-02-03-at-9-08-42-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the inner circle (1946); republic; mystery; warren douglas; 57 mins.
  2. twilight on the rio grande (1947); republic; western; gene autry; 71 mins.
  3. exposed (1947); republic; crime; mark roberts; 59 mins.
  4. angel in exile (1948); republic; romance; john carroll; 90 mins.
  5. night time in nevada (1948); republic; western; roy rogers; 67 mins.
  6. sands of iwo jima (1949); republic; war; john wayne; 100 mins.
  7. rock island trail (1950); republic; western; forrest tucker; 90 mins.
  8. the avengers (1950); republic; adventure; john carroll; 90 mins.
  9. california passage (1950); republic; western; forrest tucker; 90 mins.
  10. the sea hornet (1951); republic; adventure; rod cameron; 84 mins.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-02-08-at-7-15-11-am.png

 

Fred Allen was the stage name of an Irish comedian born John F. Sullivan. He was raised by an aunt after his mother died, and there was a lot of commotion in the family– especially when his father remarried, and his younger brother left to live with their father. Maybe it’s ironic that while juggling family loyalty and early jobs as a teenager, he took up juggling for real. He also developed a ventriloquist act and several other comedy routines.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-01-at-3-35-32-pm.png

During one of his early jobs, he was chosen to entertain coworkers at a party and was an overwhelming hit. He was encouraged to quit and hit the road as a comedian and juggler (at least that’s what he writes in his autobiography). He toured for quite a few years, perfecting his act. Some of his travels took him to other countries, but eventually, he wound up back on the east coat. Now billed as ‘Fred Allen,’ he really began to make his mark. He was appearing in vaudeville as well as in more legitimate stage shows. Plus he and a girlfriend (who became his wife) began to get small jobs on radio.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-01-at-3-36-44-pm.png

By the mid-30s, Fred had become a major star on national radio. His witty sense of humor and ease with audiences made him quite popular. In real life, he and fellow radio star Jack Benny were very close friends. But the two men and their gag writers cooked up a long-running “feud” that went back on forth on their various shows. This so-called rivalry, which people believed was real, lasted for over a decade. It was also the basis for a film the two made together at Paramount in 1940, called LOVE THY NEIGHBOR.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-01-at-3-36-17-pm.png

In the mid-40s, Fred Allen had a starring role in the film IT’S IN THE BAG!, which also featured Benny. On radio, his format changed, and he became a lot more topical. He made wry quips about his bosses, his sponsors, about the increasing popularity of television, and other things that sometimes found him censored. His style would influence comedians who came after him, like Johnny Carson. In the early 50s, he was semi-retired due to hypertension and other related health issues. But 20th Century Fox managed to get his services for two anthology films in ’52. In one of these, he was a radio star (what else?) with Ginger Rogers.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-01-at-3-37-22-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. thanks a million (1935); fox; musical comedy; dick powell; 87 mins.
  2. sally, irene and mary (1938); fox; musical comedy; alice faye; 86 mins.
  3. love thy neighbor (1940); paramount; musical comedy; jack benny; 82 mins.
  4. it’s in the bag! (1945); ua; comedy; jack benny; 87 mins.
  5. we’re not married! (1952); fox; comedy; ginger rogers; 86 mins.
  6. o. henry’s full house (1952); fox; drama; oscar levant; 117 mins.

 

Regarding the feud between Allen and Benny. I loved the story about Benny's tree. It seemed that Waukegan, Ill. where Benny grew up had planted a tree in his honor, but the tree died. Allen reported the death of the tree on his radio show and stated "Well, what do you expect. How could the tree survive in Wuakegan when the sap lives in Hollywood." Some stated it was a Christmas tree. Sadly Allen died way to young and never really established himself on TV like Jack Benny did. But he was a very funny man...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-02-13-at-7-36-18-am.png

 

Forrest Tucker came from a broken home. His mother was an alcoholic and in his early teens he was not going to school but trying to hold down a full-time job. He didn’t stay employed long, when the boss found out he was underage. Forrest then ran off and joined the U.S. Army Cavalry, but he had lied about his age again and was discharged. Next, he found a job in a theatre, and his natural instincts for entertaining people guided him from there.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-04-at-6-32-12-pm.png


When he arrived in Hollywood a short time later, Forrest was signed by Columbia where he remained under contract for several years. But Columbia did not use him properly, and he picked up lead parts at poverty row studios. His acting career, however, would go on hold when he enlisted in the military during the war. Once more he joined the Army– and this time he didn’t have to lie about his age. After the war he went back to Columbia which loaned him out to Warner Brothers for a comedy with Errol Flynn. It was NEVER SAY GOODBYE, and Forrest stole more than one scene from Flynn and the leading lady, Eleanor Parker.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-04-at-6-24-56-pm.png


Eventually he left Columbia and moved over to Republic. Herbert Yates saw potential in the actor, and Forrest was cast in a series of ‘A’ westerns and ‘A’ action films. Often he worked with Jim Davis and Rod Cameron, and his frequent leading ladies were Adele Mara and Adrian Booth Brian. Most of these pictures were hits with audiences, but the roles tended to typecast Forrest. He was seldom allowed to play comedy, which was something he was quite good at and where he had already demonstrated real skill.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-04-at-6-26-23-pm.png


He wouldn’t get a chance to shine in comedies until after he left Republic. He snagged a leading role opposite Rosalind Russell in AUNTIE MAME, and his screen career suddenly took a new direction. In the 1960s, he became known primarily as a comedian. He worked on Broadway and toured in a stage production. Also he had a two year gig on a hit TV series– the military spoof F Troop. There were plenty of guest roles after that and several more series in the following decades, though most of those were short-lived.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-04-at-6-23-26-pm.png


Near the end of his life, Forrest Tucker was honored with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. He had long since proven his versatility and his ability to delight people in a variety of roles.
 

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. hellfire (1949); republic; western; bill elliott; 90 mins.
  2. california passage (1950); republic; western; adele mara; 90 mins.
  3. oh! susanna (1951); republic; western; rod cameron; 84 mins.
  4. hoodlum empire (1952); republic; crime; brian donlevy; 98 mins.
  5. san antone (1953); republic; western; rod cameron; 90 mins.
  6. flight nurse (1953); republic; war; joan leslie; 90 mins.
  7. laughing anne (1953); republic; adventure; wendell corey; 90 mins.
  8. jubilee trail (1954); republic; western; vera ralston; 103 mins.
  9. trouble in the glen (1954); republic; comedy; orson welles; 91 mins.
  10. the vanishing american (1955); republic; western; scott brady; 90 mins.
     

screen-shot-2017-02-04-at-6-24-21-pm.png

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-02-14-at-9-56-46-am.png

 

Judy Canova was the daughter of a singer and a businessman. Her parents encouraged Judy to join her older siblings in a family vaudeville act that toured the south. They were known as the Georgia Crackers, though they were really from Florida. Later when Judy went solo she was identified with the Arkansas region, billed as an Ozark Nightingale. It didn’t hurt that her first husband was comedian-musician Bob Burns who was known as the Arkansas Traveler.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-06-at-8-11-04-am.png


While she was still a teenager, the Canova act got their first taste of national success when Rudy Vallee featured them on his radio show. They were quickly booked as guests on other radio programs and became very popular. This led to a revue for the Canovas on Broadway, and small parts for Judy at Warner Brothers. Judy also began to make hit records. With her increased popularity, she signed with Republic Pictures to star in a series of comedy films. And a short time later, she had her own weekly radio program which ran for 12 years.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-06-at-8-10-50-am1.pn


Judy had two contracts at Republic. Both tenures at the studio utilized her musical talents and exploited her hayseed image for laughs. During the early 40s, she costarred on screen with Susan Hayward, Francis Lederer and Joe E. Brown. She had many hits, and they followed a simple formula where Judy was cast as a Cinderella-type bumpkin looking for love. She usually didn’t have to look too far.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-06-at-8-09-50-am.png


In the mid-40s, she and Herbert Yates were embroiled in a contract dispute so she left Republic for several years. She freelanced at Columbia but mostly concentrated on her radio program and her stage act. By 1950, she and Yates had patched up their differences and she signed a new contract with Republic. She returned to the big screen in more musical comedies, and this time some of them were filmed in color. When her contract ended in 1955, she turned up on television. But her TV appearances were sporadic. She guest-starred in a memorable episode of The Danny Thomas Show where she sang two songs and did her standard rural shtick.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-06-at-8-10-26-am.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. scatterbrain (1940); republic; comedy; alan mowbray; 73 mins.
  2. sis hopkins (1941); republic; comedy; susan hayward; 99 mins.
  3. puddin’ head (1941); republic; comedy; francis lederer; 80 mins.
  4. joan of ozark (1942); republic; comedy; joe e. brown; 82 mins.
  5. sleepy lagoon (1943); republic; musical comedy; dennis day; 65 mins.
  6. honeychile (1951); republic; comedy; eddie foy jr.; 89 mins.
  7. oklahoma annie (1952); republic; comedy; john russell; 90 mins.
  8. the wac from walla walla (1952); republic; comedy; stephen dunne; 83 mins.
  9. untamed heiress (1954); republic; comedy; don barry; 70 mins.
  10. carolina cannonball (1955); republic; musical comedy; andy clyde; 73 mins.
Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-02-15-at-8-01-06-am.png

 

He’s been called the best bad guy that ever was in the golden age of Hollywood. And though he did other kinds of roles in all sorts of pictures, Roy Barcroft is mostly remembered for his countless turns playing the villain in Republic’s B westerns. He became so identified as the baddie that audiences cheered when they saw him in the first few minutes of a film, then eagerly looked forward to his arrest or climactic death at the end of story.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-07-at-8-37-27-am1.pn


Off screen Roy was regarded as one of the nicest guys around. He fell into acting, because he had extensive military experience and was offered jobs playing soldier extras. Originally, he had no intention of pursuing a motion picture career. He was a salesman and did a little bit of theater to improve his voice and presentation style when selling things to customers. But someone noticed he had talent, and soon he was offered small roles in serials and low-budget films.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-07-at-8-37-18-am1.pn


From 1936 to 1943, he worked steadily and quickly became typecast as a heavy. His ability to play ruthless land barons and crooked sheriffs led Herbert Yates of Republic to sign him to an exclusive 10-year contract. Until B westerns went out of fashion in the mid-50s, Roy remained gainfully employed in the movies. During the years he was under contract at Republic, he made 150 motion pictures, averaging around a dozen per year. In the mid-50s, he moved over to television without missing a beat.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-07-at-8-38-56-am1.pn


During the late 50s and 60s, Roy was just as busy on TV as he had been in films at Republic. He turned up in almost every major weekly western series. Occasionally, he accepted work outside the western genre where he might have a chance to play a different character. For two years, he appeared in The Adventures of Spin and Marty, a serial that was part of Disney’s Mickey Mouse Club. Later, there were returns to the big screen– he was a judge in THE REIVERS and a proprietor in MONTE WALSH, which was released after Roy’s death. According to the IMDb, he wound up with 379 screen credits. Not too shabby for a guy who was supposed to be a salesman.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-07-at-8-38-01-am1.pn

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. sheriff of sundown (1944); republic; western; allan lane; 55 mins.
  2. santa fe saddlemates (1945); republic; western; sunset carson; 58 mins.
  3. bells of rosarita (1945); republic; western; roy rogers; 68 mins.
  4. wagon wheels westward (1945); republic; western; bill elliott; 56 mins.
  5. home on the range (1946); republic; western; monte hale; 55 mins.
  6. my pal trigger (1946); republic; western; roy rogers; 79 mins.
  7. son of zorro (1947); republic; adventure; george turner; 140 mins.
  8. last frontier uprising (1947); republic; western; monte hale; 67 mins.
  9. jesse james rides again (1947); republic; action; clayton moore; 180 mins.
  10. marshal of cripple creek (1947); republic; western; allan lane; 56 mins.
Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-02-16-at-7-05-56-am.png

 

Dale Evans was determined to make it in show business when she was younger. She had already married and a had a child by the age of 15. And at 16, she was a single mother trying to break into the recording industry. She found office jobs in radio stations, and in her off-hours, she was writing songs and performing them where she could. Eventually, she was able to leave her desk job and start playing her tunes on the radio.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-07-at-5-08-28-pm.png


In the meantime Dale married again and kept busy pursuing her goals as a singer. She toured and played different clubs across the country. She found her way to southern California and landed a contract at 20th Century Fox. Her second marriage failed and Dale married a third time. But Fox did not want to promote her as someone who had been married so frequently, nor the fact she had such an ‘old’ son. So publicity materials stated her son was her brother and that she was unmarried. The lies continued for several years.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-07-at-5-09-20-pm.png


Dale wound up in musicals at Fox, but during the war the studio terminated her contract. She then moved over to Republic. Her first films for Herbert Yates were musical comedies, and she had supporting roles. But quickly she moved up to lead roles. Dale did not make her first western with Roy Rogers until a year later. Their first on-screen collaboration was a big hit and more productions followed. In the films they played romantic couples, and off the set, a real-life romance developed. Dale had been married three times, and Roy had been married twice when they tied the knot in 1947. But this union would be a success and it lasted for the rest of their lives.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-07-at-5-09-07-pm.png


When Dale took time off during a pregnancy, Roy was cast with other leading ladies. And when Dale came back to work, she made a crime drama in addition to the westerns with Roy and his horse Trigger. They continued to work at Republic until 1951, when B westerns were being phased out. They moved over to television the same year, and for most of the 50s, Dale and Roy delighted audiences with new stories broadcast on their weekly series. In addition to working with her husband, Dale also wrote books and was very involved in religious crusades. She stayed busy for the next several decades and was always a true cowgirl at heart.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-07-at-5-57-36-pm1.pn

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. swing your partner (1943); republic; comedy; lulu belle & scotty; 72 mins.
  2. casanova in burlesque (1944); republic; comedy; joe e. brown; 74 mins.
  3. cowboy and the senorita (1944); republic; western; roy rogers; 78 mins.
  4. san fernando valley (1944); republic; western; roy rogers; 74 mins.
  5. don’t fence me in (1945); republic; western; roy rogers; 71 mins.
  6. the big show-off (1945); republic; comedy; arthur lake; 69 mins.
  7. along the navajo trail (1945); republic; western; roy rogers; 66 mins.
  8. the trespasser (1947); republic; crime; warren douglas; 71 mins.
  9. the golden stallion (1949); republic; western; roy rogers; 67 mins.
  10. pals of the golden west (1951); republic; western; roy rogers; 68 mins.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Can you guess the ones I will be spotlighting..?


 


Oscar actresses


screen-shot-2017-01-16-at-8-08-16-am1.pn


 


Saturday February 18-- #465: an Oscar for GENTLEMAN'S AGREEMENT


Sunday February 19-- #466: an Oscar for THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL


Monday February 20-- #467: an Oscar for WRITTEN ON THE WIND


Tuesday February 21-- #468: an Oscar for A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE


Wednesday February 22-- #469: an Oscar for THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL


Thursday February 23-- #470: an Oscar for BORN YESTERDAY


Friday February 24-- #471: an Oscar for ANTHONY ADVERSE


 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Can you guess the ones I will be spotlighting..?

 

Oscar actresses

screen-shot-2017-01-16-at-8-08-16-am1.pn

 

Saturday February 18-- #465: an Oscar for GENTLEMAN'S AGREEMENT

Sunday February 19-- #466: an Oscar for THE TRIP TO BOUNTIFUL

Monday February 20-- #467: an Oscar for WRITTEN ON THE WIND

Tuesday February 21-- #468: an Oscar for A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE

Wednesday February 22-- #469: an Oscar for THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL

Thursday February 23-- #470: an Oscar for BORN YESTERDAY

Friday February 24-- #471: an Oscar for ANTHONY ADVERSE

 

It is going to be an exciting line-up.

Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-02-18-at-7-17-53-am.png

 

Though she did not have the best relationship with her sons or some of the leading ladies she worked with, Celeste Holm did remain in good standing with producers and directors who appreciated her considerable talents. She came from a privileged background, jet-setting around the globe with her parents and finally settling in Chicago where she would receive a private education. While in school she took up the classics and fell in love with the stage.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-13-at-12-02-10-pm1.p


In the late 1930s Celeste had some minor success on Broadway. This opened more doors for her, and within a few years, she had moved up the ranks. She became known for her skills in lighter material, notably in musical comedies. She had a supporting role in Rodgers & Hammerstein’s long-running smash Oklahoma! and became very popular during that time. The talent scouts from 20th Century Fox were paying attention.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-13-at-11-52-13-am.pn


After Fox offered her a contract, Celeste relocated to Hollywood. Her first two films continued in the vein of light musical comedy. She was in THREE LITTLE GIRLS IN BLUE with June Haver and Vera-Ellen; then in the robust musical CARNIVAL IN COSTA RICA which starred Vera-Ellen again with Dick Haymes. It wasn’t until shortly afterward that Celeste began to earn plaudits for her more serious work at Fox– especially with a strong supporting role in Elia Kazan’s social message drama GENTLEMAN’S AGREEMENT. She received an Oscar as Best Supporting Actress. There were more excellent roles after this. She appeared with Loretta Young in COME TO THE STABLE (a second nomination); and in ALL ABOUT EVE (another nomination).
 

screen-shot-2017-02-13-at-11-53-22-am.pn


By 1950 Celeste felt restricted by her contract at Fox and begged out. She was technically off contract when Joseph Mankiewicz decided he wanted her for EVE. She did not hit it off with Bette Davis, but Mankiewicz made sure Celeste remained in the picture. However, she would not work for Fox again until over a decade later. She took five years off from movies, finally resurfacing at MGM in two films with Frank Sinatra. Again, she was back to playing lighter material, and though she previously had some leads at Fox, she would now remain in supporting roles.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-13-at-12-30-38-pm1.p


There were a few unsuccessful attempts at headlining her own sitcom. When those efforts failed, she took guest roles and smaller parts on the big screen. In the 1980s she had a recurring role on the CBS sudser Falcon Crest but clashed with Jane Wyman and was soon written out. She bounced back with a part in the motion picture comedy THREE MEN AND A BABY. In the 90s she had a role on an east coast-based soap opera, then she turned up in a heartwarming primetime drama playing a grandmother in Promised Land.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-13-at-11-52-29-am1.p

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. three little girls in blue (1946); fox; musical; june haver; 93 mins.
  2. carnival in costa rica (1947); fox; musical; dick haymes; 97 mins.
  3. gentleman’s agreement (1947); fox; drama; gregory peck; 118 mins.
  4. road house (1948); fox; crime; ida lupino; 95 mins.
  5. chicken every sunday (1949); fox; comedy; dan dailey; 94 mins.
  6. come to the stable (1949); fox; comedy drama; loretta young; 94 mins.
  7. all about eve (1950); fox; drama; bette davis; 138 mins.
  8. the tender trap (1955); mgm; comedy; frank sinatra; 111 mins.
  9. high society (1956); mgm; musical comedy; frank sinatra; 111 mins.
  10. bachelor flat (1962); fox; comedy; terry-thomas; 91 mins.
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-02-18-at-7-17-53-am.png

 

Though she did not have the best relationship with her sons or some of the leading ladies she worked with, Celeste Holm did remain in good standing with producers and directors who appreciated her considerable talents. She came from a privileged background, jet-setting around the globe with her parents and finally settling in Chicago where she would receive a private education. While in school she took up the classics and fell in love with the stage.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-13-at-12-02-10-pm1.p

In the late 1930s Celeste had some minor success on Broadway. This opened more doors for her, and within a few years, she had moved up the ranks. She became known for her skills in lighter material, notably in musical comedies. She had a supporting role in Rodgers & Hammerstein’s long-running smash Oklahoma! and became very popular during that time. The talent scouts from 20th Century Fox were paying attention.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-13-at-11-52-13-am.pn

After Fox offered her a contract, Celeste relocated to Hollywood. Her first two films continued in the vein of light musical comedy. She was in THREE LITTLE GIRLS IN BLUE with June Haver and Vera-Ellen; then in the robust musical CARNIVAL IN COSTA RICA which starred Vera-Ellen again with Dick Haymes. It wasn’t until shortly afterward that Celeste began to earn plaudits for her more serious work at Fox– especially with a strong supporting role in Elia Kazan’s social message drama GENTLEMAN’S AGREEMENT. She received an Oscar as Best Supporting Actress. There were more excellent roles after this. She appeared with Loretta Young in COME TO THE STABLE (a second nomination); and in ALL ABOUT EVE (another nomination).

 

screen-shot-2017-02-13-at-11-53-22-am.pn

By 1950 Celeste felt restricted by her contract at Fox and begged out. She was technically off contract when Joseph Mankiewicz decided he wanted her for EVE. She did not hit it off with Bette Davis, but Mankiewicz made sure Celeste remained in the picture. However, she would not work for Fox again until over a decade later. She took five years off from movies, finally resurfacing at MGM in two films with Frank Sinatra. Again, she was back to playing lighter material, and though she previously had some leads at Fox, she would now remain in supporting roles.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-13-at-12-30-38-pm1.p

There were a few unsuccessful attempts at headlining her own sitcom. When those efforts failed, she took guest roles and smaller parts on the big screen. In the 1980s she had a recurring role on the CBS sudser Falcon Crest but clashed with Jane Wyman and was soon written out. She bounced back with a part in the motion picture comedy THREE MEN AND A BABY. In the 90s she had a role on an east coast-based soap opera, then she turned up in a heartwarming primetime drama playing a grandmother in Promised Land.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-13-at-11-52-29-am1.p

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. three little girls in blue (1946); fox; musical; june haver; 93 mins.
  2. carnival in costa rica (1947); fox; musical; dick haymes; 97 mins.
  3. gentleman’s agreement (1947); fox; drama; gregory peck; 118 mins.
  4. road house (1948); fox; crime; ida lupino; 95 mins.
  5. chicken every sunday (1949); fox; comedy; dan dailey; 94 mins.
  6. come to the stable (1949); fox; comedy drama; loretta young; 94 mins.
  7. all about eve (1950); fox; drama; bette davis; 138 mins.
  8. the tender trap (1955); mgm; comedy; frank sinatra; 111 mins.
  9. high society (1956); mgm; musical comedy; frank sinatra; 111 mins.
  10. bachelor flat (1962); fox; comedy; terry-thomas; 91 mins.

 

Very surprising to see her as Tuesday Weld's mother in "Bachelor Flat".

 

Loved both her films with Frank Sinatra at MGM.

 

Ran into her once on the street in NYC - she was every inch "the star".

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Very surprising to see her as Tuesday Weld's mother in "Bachelor Flat".

 

Loved both her films with Frank Sinatra at MGM.

 

Ran into her once on the street in NYC - she was every inch "the star".

 

I don't doubt it. I think the problem she had with Davis and Wyman is that while she was playing supporting roles she considered herself the main star. And she might have resented the power the other women had over her as the real stars.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-02-19-at-7-17-33-am.png

 

Though she was often nominated, Geraldine Page tended to be overlooked by Oscar voters. When she finally “won” for her wonderful performance in THE TRIP TO BEAUTIFUL, it was a triumphant moment. Geraldine had previously been singled out in supporting and lead categories for many wide-ranging movie roles she had played over the years. Even her first substantial cinematic job, costarring with John Wayne in HONDO, had netted her a nomination.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-14-at-3-37-32-pm.png


When Geraldine was not on screen she kept busy on stage. The theater was her first and truest love. She appeared in several notable Broadway productions, including an early one with James Dean. Dean was almost fired, but Geraldine intervened on his behalf. The stage role most associated with Geraldine was her Alma in Tennessee Williams’ wistfully poetic SUMMER AND SMOKE. She brought the character to life in the feature film version for producer Hal Wallis. She also appeared in SWEET BIRD OF YOUTH, in both the stage and screen versions.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-14-at-3-36-40-pm.png


She continued to perform on Broadway and take film roles, but she also began to branch out more on television. After appearing in some live anthology dramas, she found her niche doing TV movies based on stories by Truman Capote. She earned two Emmys for this work, and then she appeared in a movie based on Capote’s writing. After her success in these projects, she took important guest roles on Kojak and Hawaii Five-O. But of course, Geraldine kept returning to the theater where she was most at home.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-14-at-3-38-02-pm.png


In addition to performing, Geraldine Page was also someone who believed in the value of teaching. She taught acting to young hopefuls who might learn from her interpretation of “the Method.” And we can still learn from her by watching the many excellent performances she gave that have fortunately been preserved.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-14-at-3-48-16-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. hondo (1953); warner brothers; western; john wayne; 84 mins.
  2. summer and smoke (1961); paramount; drama; laurence harvey; 118 mins.
  3. sweet bird of youth (1962); mgm; drama; paul newman; 120 mins.
  4. toys in the attic (1963); ua; drama; dean martin; 90 mins.
  5. dear heart (1964); warner brothers; drama; glenn ford; 113 mins.
  6. the happiest millionaire (1967); disney; musical comedy; fred macmurray; 118 mins.
  7. what ever happened to aunt alice? (1969); cinerama releasing corporation; horror; ruth gordon; 101 mins.
  8. the beguiled (1971); universal; western horror; clint eastwood; 105 mins.
  9. interiors (1978); ua; drama; maureen stapleton; 92 mins.
  10. the trip to bountiful (1985); island pictures; drama; john heard; 108 mins.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-02-19-at-7-17-33-am.png

 

Though she was often nominated, Geraldine Page tended to be overlooked by Oscar voters. When she finally “won” for her wonderful performance in THE TRIP TO BEAUTIFUL, it was a triumphant moment. Geraldine had previously been singled out in supporting and lead categories for many wide-ranging movie roles she had played over the years. Even her first substantial cinematic job, costarring with John Wayne in HONDO, had netted her a nomination.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-14-at-3-37-32-pm.png

When Geraldine was not on screen she kept busy on stage. The theater was her first and truest love. She appeared in several notable Broadway productions, including an early one with James Dean. Dean was almost fired, but Geraldine intervened on his behalf. The stage role most associated with Geraldine was her Alma in Tennessee Williams’ wistfully poetic SUMMER AND SMOKE. She brought the character to life in the feature film version for producer Hal Wallis. She also appeared in SWEET BIRD OF YOUTH, in both the stage and screen versions.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-14-at-3-36-40-pm.png

She continued to perform on Broadway and take film roles, but she also began to branch out more on television. After appearing in some live anthology dramas, she found her niche doing TV movies based on stories by Truman Capote. She earned two Emmys for this work, and then she appeared in a movie based on Capote’s writing. After her success in these projects, she took important guest roles on Kojak and Hawaii Five-O. But of course, Geraldine kept returning to the theater where she was most at home.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-14-at-3-38-02-pm.png

In addition to performing, Geraldine Page was also someone who believed in the value of teaching. She taught acting to young hopefuls who might learn from her interpretation of “the Method.” And we can still learn from her by watching the many excellent performances she gave that have fortunately been preserved.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-14-at-3-48-16-pm.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. hondo (1953); warner brothers; western; john wayne; 84 mins.
  2. summer and smoke (1961); paramount; drama; laurence harvey; 118 mins.
  3. sweet bird of youth (1962); mgm; drama; paul newman; 120 mins.
  4. toys in the attic (1963); ua; drama; dean martin; 90 mins.
  5. dear heart (1964); warner brothers; drama; glenn ford; 113 mins.
  6. the happiest millionaire (1967); disney; musical comedy; fred macmurray; 118 mins.
  7. what ever happened to aunt alice? (1969); cinerama releasing corporation; horror; ruth gordon; 101 mins.
  8. the beguiled (1971); universal; western horror; clint eastwood; 105 mins.
  9. interiors (1978); ua; drama; maureen stapleton; 92 mins.
  10. the trip to bountiful (1985); island pictures; drama; john heard; 108 mins.

 

"Summer and Smoke", "Sweet Bird of Youth" and "Dear Heart" - these are glorious performances.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be the first to admit that many times, I'm not so 'quick on the draw'.  However, I noticed in the opening credits for "All About Eve" that the first names of the four principle players in that movie all end with the letter "E" (Davis, Baxter, Sanders, Holm).  I just thought it was a quirky coincidence that I never noticed until TCM showed the film during 31 Days of Oscar!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

screen-shot-2017-02-20-at-6-50-03-am.png

 

Dorothy Malone’s screen career went through several phases. Originally, she came to Hollywood at the age of eighteen. A talent scout for RKO had discovered her performing on a Texas college campus. In her first few films she was uncredited, and after a year, RKO dropped her. But she moved right over to Warner Brothers without missing a step. Her new studio gave her minor roles, and she quickly proved herself.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-15-at-7-15-03-am.png


Warners put Dorothy in all kinds of motion pictures. She was cast in musicals and comedies with Dennis Morgan and Jack Carson; utilized in crime dramas with Humphrey Bogart and Zachary Scott; and she also found her niche in the western genre with Joel McCrea. After she left Warners, she continued to make westerns throughout the 1950s, and in an interview, the actress claimed she felt most comfortable in westerns.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-15-at-7-17-29-am.png


But her career underwent a major overhaul when Douglas Sirk cast her as a nymphomaniac in the classic melodrama WRITTEN ON THE WIND. Dorothy’s performance was so mesmerizing she earned a best supporting actress Oscar. Sirk hired her again for his aviation melodrama THE TARNISHED ANGELS which reunited her on screen with Rock Hudson and Robert Stack, and she became a mainstay at Universal for the next few years. She did a high-profile film with James Cagney and an even more important role back at Warners with Errol Flynn, where she played Diana Barrymore in TOO MUCH TOO SOON.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-15-at-7-14-54-am.png


In the early 60s, Dorothy’s movie output slowed. She was married and raising two young daughters. But she found time to do a disaster film with Robert Stack; a western with Rock Hudson; and a beach comedy with Robert Cummings. There was also a memorable performance in a two-part episode of Route 66 where she worked with Michael Rennie. In 1964, she turned exclusively to television when 20th Century Fox handed her Lana Turner’s old role as Constance MacKenzie in the small screen version of Peyton Place. It was a ratings sensation and brought Dorothy a whole new generation of fans.
 

screen-shot-2017-02-15-at-7-16-44-am.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the big sleep (1946); warner brothers; crime; humphrey bogart; 114 mins.
  2. one sunday afternoon (1948); warner brothers; musical; dennis morgan; 90 mins.
  3. colorado territory (1949); warner brothers; western; joel mccrea; 94 mins.
  4. saddle legion (1951); rko; western; tim holt; 60 mins.
  5. law and order (1953); universal; western; ronald reagan; 80 mins.
  6. battle cry (1955); warner brothers; war; van heflin; 149 mins.
  7. written on the wind (1956); universal; drama; rock hudson; 99 mins.
  8. the tarnished angels (1957); universal; drama; rock hudson; 91 mins.
  9. too much too soon (1958); warner brothers; drama; errol flynn; 121 mins.
  10. the last voyage (1960); mgm; disaster; robert stack; 91 mins.
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

screen-shot-2017-02-20-at-6-50-03-am.png

 

Dorothy Malone’s screen career went through several phases. Originally, she came to Hollywood at the age of eighteen. A talent scout for RKO had discovered her performing on a Texas college campus. In her first few films she was uncredited, and after a year, RKO dropped her. But she moved right over to Warner Brothers without missing a step. Her new studio gave her minor roles, and she quickly proved herself.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-15-at-7-15-03-am.png

Warners put Dorothy in all kinds of motion pictures. She was cast in musicals and comedies with Dennis Morgan and Jack Carson; utilized in crime dramas with Humphrey Bogart and Zachary Scott; and she also found her niche in the western genre with Joel McCrea. After she left Warners, she continued to make westerns throughout the 1950s, and in an interview, the actress claimed she felt most comfortable in westerns.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-15-at-7-17-29-am.png

But her career underwent a major overhaul when Douglas Sirk cast her as a nymphomaniac in the classic melodrama WRITTEN ON THE WIND. Dorothy’s performance was so mesmerizing she earned a best supporting actress Oscar. Sirk hired her again for his aviation melodrama THE TARNISHED ANGELS which reunited her on screen with Rock Hudson and Robert Stack, and she became a mainstay at Universal for the next few years. She did a high-profile film with James Cagney and an even more important role back at Warners with Errol Flynn, where she played Diana Barrymore in TOO MUCH TOO SOON.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-15-at-7-14-54-am.png

In the early 60s, Dorothy’s movie output slowed. She was married and raising two young daughters. But she found time to do a disaster film with Robert Stack; a western with Rock Hudson; and a beach comedy with Robert Cummings. There was also a memorable part in a two-part episode of Route 66 where she worked with Michael Rennie. In 1964, she turned exclusively to television when 20th Century Fox handed her Lana Turner’s old role as Constance MacKenzie in the small screen version of Peyton Place. It was a ratings sensation and brought Dorothy a whole new generation of fans.

 

screen-shot-2017-02-15-at-7-16-44-am.png

09d8a-screen2bshot2b2016-12-192bat2b2-00

  1. the big sleep (1946); warner brothers; crime; humphrey bogart; 114 mins.
  2. one sunday afternoon (1948); warner brothers; musical; dennis morgan; 90 mins.
  3. colorado territory (1949); warner brothers; western; joel mccrea; 94 mins.
  4. saddle legion (1951); rko; western; tim holt; 60 mins.
  5. law and order (1953); universal; western; ronald reagan; 80 mins.
  6. battle cry (1955); warner brothers; war; van heflin; 149 mins.
  7. written on the wind (1956); universal; drama; rock hudson; 99 mins.
  8. the tarnished angels (1957); universal; drama; rock hudson; 91 mins.
  9. too much too soon (1958); warner brothers; drama; errol flynn; 121 mins.
  10. the last voyage (1960); mgm; disaster; robert stack; 91 mins.

 

Her performance as Diana Barrymore in "Too Much Too Soon" is a highly underrated performance.

 

However, she did gain cinematic immortality as Marylee Hadley in "Written On The Wind". 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Her performance as Diana Barrymore in "Too Much Too Soon" is a highly underrated performance.

 

However, she did gain cinematic immortality as Marylee Hadley in "Written On The Wind". 

 

I wish TCM would do some sort of tribute for Dorothy Malone, either a primetime spotlight or a full day Summer Under the Stars. She's still living and it would be a nice honor.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish TCM would do some sort of tribute for Dorothy Malone, either a primetime spotlight or a full day Summer Under the Stars. She's still living and it would be a nice honor.

 

I agree.   Malone deserves at least a day.   Hey they could show Basic Instincts. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...