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Fantastic Camera-Work


NickAndNora34
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Some of my friends don't pay any attention to aspects of film besides the actors/actresses, special effects, etc. But I think the camera work also adds a lot to the overall story. Two examples that come to mind right now, are The Lady in the Lake and Dark Passage (with Humphrey Bogart). Both of these films deal with us, as the audience, feeling as if we are the actual character in the film, due to the first person-view of the camera. The Lady in the Lake features detective Philip Marlowe in its entirety, while Bogie's film has the camera portraying a first-person view up until he has recovered (I won't say from what, in order not to spoil it for others), which totally and completely works for the plot line.

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I mention this movie now and then in threads, and sorry to repeat myself but I can't help but mentioning it again - The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928) has some of the best camera work I've ever seen, for the strongest emotional effect: the images of suffering Joan, her tormentors, the closeups of the torture instruments and the scene of her burning at the stake...

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Agreed about Dark Passage.  I love the unique first person perspective that is used through the first half of the film.  I love that the film is shown from Bogart's perspective.  It was a great idea and a great film.

 

I know that this is almost cliche to say at this point, but Citizen Kane has fantastic camera work.  One of my favorite scenes is when Kane is running for office and the camera is pointed up toward him, almost as if to demonstrate how much larger than life Kane really was.  I read that Welles actually had his crew dig a hole in the soundstage floor so that the camera angle could be even lower.  The innovation in camera work in Citizen Kane was truly revolutionary and paved the way for future films.

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