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Did you like best? The de Caprio version? Clifton Webb version? Or the English version currently on TCM, A Night to Remember. I always base my opinion FIRST by enjoyment level, then technical etc. I've been saying for years that I don't think the award winning version is any better than the first 2. I think they are all terrific movies. Whatcha all think?

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I saw "A Night to Remember" when I was a teenager back in the day before videotape and vcrs when the only outlets you had for seeing classic movies was late night television, university screenings and library screenings.

 

That movie made my buy the book by Walter Lord and there are passages and passengers that I remember to this day.

 

The thing I love about the Cameron movie is the eye for detail and the reproduction of the ship and the sinking. There were characters in the Cameron movie that I recognized immediately from Lord's book (the baker, Jack Thayer, etc).

 

I watch all three for different reasons and like all three for different reasons.

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***Spoilers***

 

The ship sinks. No, that's NOT the spoiler.

 

While 20th-Century Fox's 1952 version may be the LEAST accurate and the one that took the most dramatic liberties with the various passengers (the illegitimate son, the tortured priest), to me it was the most emotionally satisfying of the three.

 

Clifton Webb's reunion with his "son" was touching and very well-done. And of all the reenactments of Mrs. Straus refusing to leave her husband's side, the one in the '52 version is the most touching. The priest's selfless act in the boiler room was also powerful.

 

As Titanic sank, members of the ship's orchestra played "Nearer My God to Thee." The '57 and '97 films feature what I'm guessing is the English version of this song, thus making them both historically correct. But here again, even though the '52 film features the "American" version of this hymn (different melody), this is the version that, for me, packs the greatest emotional wallop (the whole scene, not just the song).

 

Interesting note. I'm not sure if you could compare this to Nero fiddling while Rome burned around him, but In 1943, a film company in Germany made a film about Titanic.

 

Here they were, right in the middle of losing the most horrific war of the 20th century---devoting time, energy, and money to a film that had more relevance to British and American history than it did to German history. I've read that the film negatively portrayed western capitalists. Perhaps this is one of the reasons German filmmakers wanted to make the film at that particular time.

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Although I like all 3 versions I must pick the spectacular 1997 movie.

The special effects were outstanding especially the great ship breaking in half, something that the other two films weren't aware of at the time of production.

And the passengers breathing the cold air was most realistic, making you realize how devastating it actually was on that April night in 1912.

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Hi Scarlett,

 

I saw "A Night to Remember" in 1957 on board the 'Ivernia', an ocean liner taking me to Europe (Rotterdam). I was being sent to school in Switzerland.

I thought it was a pretty good movie and true to the event; but it was no film to show on board an ocean liner!!! Sort of like show an airline disaster movie on an airplane.....

 

"Titanic" (1997) was excellent in the disaster portions but they should have cut most of that gooey love story and focussed on some other passengers - Molly Brown or the Astors - to bring it truer.

Also, everyone was either good or bad but not fleshed out. Billy Zane was just bad and Frances Fisher was just a ****. Didn't they have any other qualities?

 

Larry

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I've seen the German version, and it definitely swings the facts around by the tail. Sheer propaganda! And not a very good film. Interesting, though.

 

The special effects in Cameron's version can't be beat, but the writing! Aaargh! I found A Night to Remember superior to the others in dramatic effect.

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I love the 1997 version. Cant help it. I love the music too, the graphics are amazing as well. I love the storyline too. Also, I have the Clifton Webb version, I havent seen ityet. I love the Titanic history. I think I have seen every document on the ship ever made. Even the 1984 Documentary. I havent seen A Night To Remember yet though. I want too.

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My favorite is "A Night to Remember." It is quite accurate, historically, and is interesting to watch. I think the 1950s "Titanic" with Clifton Webb seems to be happening in the 1950s, not 1912! That's the same problem I have with the 1997 version - many of the characters have 1990s attitudes. I'm not too fond of the storyline, either. But all three have strong points.

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"A Night to Remember" by far ! ! !

 

The '97 version is "nails on a chalkboard" to me eyes and ears. Three quarters of the way through that and I was longing to be on the original Titanic sinking..........sinking............sinking.........

 

:(

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I'll take the Barbara Stanwyck "Titanic" anyday over the boring 90s version. The story may have been mostly a fictionalized version but it really caught your attention. My favorite scene is when the fastidious and odious Clifton Webb warned Barbara that she would never get away taking their son away from Webb. Barbara looked at him for a moment before muttering, "He's not your son." And that final scene of her in the life raft as she and the others watched the ship go down is heart-breaking. On the DVD version of this movie, the biggest complaint is Richard Schiekel's commentary. He sounds like he's struggling to stay awake as he stammers and gulps and says things like, "Now...now here is Bar...Bar...Barbara Stanwyck, she...eh, eh, she was...eh, she was a great, uh, uh actress." Other than that, the DVD version is well worth adding to your collection.

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"A Night To Remember", easily. Maybe since I saw it first. I've always enjoyed Kenneth More. I like the British sensibility of the movie. One funny thing was the scene in the row boats with the American woman, I thought looked a lot like Kathy Bates in the remake.

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  • 3 weeks later...

A Night To Remember, is just that. Memorable. The simple things, truly make the film. People may see the movie, but not the story. They just want to be entertained and not have to use their minds or imaginations. Technology does that for us. I don't understand, if they can improve the quality of a film, why can't they create new films. Why do they use the old ones? Nobody happen to mention, a very young, Robert Wagner, was also in this film. A small part, for the upcoming actor. Barbara Stanwyck, is one of my favorite actress. But, the storyline, was the true part of the film.

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Give me the l950 version with Stanwyck and Webb. The story might have been fictionalized but these two pros really turned on the fireworks. Stanwyck in particular was great as the small town woman who married a rich man. The scenes with her Webb taunting and tearing at each other are memorable. The James Cameron version was total hype and the first half could have been eliminated. The destruction of the ship was impressive but that icccky love story between two unattractive people completely dispelled any enjoyment. Dicaprio looked like a teenage boy trying to act like a man. IT's always the same with him in all his roles--in particular GAngs of New York and "the Aviator." He's like a kid brother dressed up as an adult.

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Thanks, pktrekgirl. There are certain actors (in this case, a so-called actor) on whom I change the channel immediately, and DiCaprio is one of those. Wasn't it an awful movie, and didn't you wonder what all the fuss was about? I did.

 

Meanwhile, darn, I've never seen the Webb-Stanwyck version! I hope TCM can find time to squeeze it in between their Anime Alley showings in the next few months.

 

Joke, that was a joke.

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