Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

THIRTY SECONDS OVER TOKYO


Palmerin
 Share

Recommended Posts

As a foreigner, there are things about the USA that go over my head, such as the fascination with 7 December 1941.

Why such devotion to Pearl Harbor? The USA and Japan have had perfect relations since the end of WWII, quite unlike what has been the case with the USA's ally during WWII, the very ornery and very ill tempered Soviet=Russian Bear.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps much of it has to do with how the whole thing came about.  The missteps and oversights that brought it about,  Many generations of citizens from many countries have some historical event that turned out to be a sort of "rallying cry" that brought them together as a nation.

 

For one generation, it was Pearl Harbor.

 

Perhaps Viet Nam for another.

 

For another, it was 9-11-2001.

 

And don't forget, the attack on Pearl Harbor DID change both the course of history, AND the United States.

 

Plus, a movie like the thread title brings to light other events surrounding the attack that many people at the time, or for years after, were unaware of for one reason or another.  For example, when I first saw this movie as an eight or nine year old on TV years after it was made, I thought it was just one of those "war movie" fictions, and never a real event.  Which in hindsight, is a real shame.

 

Sepiatone

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you really think this is all about selling movie tickets?

 

Historical event, movie about = selling movie tickets. Sort of like D-Day, Robin Hood robbing the rich to give to the poor, the Civil War, The Russian Revolution, San Francisco earthquake, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Palmerin--The U.S. had not been attacked/invaded by another country since The War of 1812 (ended in 1815, if I remember correctly).  There was a feeling of safety/invulnerability--other countries might be attacked/invaded, but the U.S. NEVER would.  And then December 7th, 1941 came, and Hawaii was attacked by the Japanese.  It almost didn't matter who--that feeling of Safety/Invulnerability was Gone--Forever.  The movie "1941" (1979) has a historical basis--California was in a state of near- panic for a week or two after Pearl Harbor.

 

Vietnam drove home the point that the World situation was irrevocably changed.

 

9/11/2001 was another wake up call that the world had irrevocably changed.

 

John Ford did a documentary on Pearl Harbor that's on YT.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Palmerin--The U.S. had not been attacked/invaded by another country since The War of 1812 (ended in 1815, if I remember correctly).  There was a feeling of safety/invulnerability--other countries might be attacked/invaded, but the U.S. NEVER would.  And then December 7th, 1941 came, and Hawaii was attacked by the Japanese.  It almost didn't matter who--that feeling of Safety/Invulnerability was Gone--Forever.  The movie "1941" (1979) has a historical basis--California was in a state of near- panic for a week or two after Pearl Harbor.

 

Vietnam drove home the point that the World situation was irrevocably changed.

 

9/11/2001 was another wake up call that the world had irrevocably changed.

 

John Ford did a documentary on Pearl Harbor that's on YT.

If you think about it, Americans were kind of foolish and naive in that regard. It's like any homeowner thinking he will never get burgled. It can happen to anyone at any time, especially if you've been lax about security.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps much of it has to do with how the whole thing came about.  The missteps and oversights that brought it about,  Many generations of citizens from many countries have some historical event that turned out to be a sort of "rallying cry" that brought them together as a nation.

 

For one generation, it was Pearl Harbor.

 

Perhaps Viet Nam for another.

 

For another, it was 9-11-2001.

 

And don't forget, the attack on Pearl Harbor DID change both the course of history, AND the United States.

 

Plus, a movie like the thread title brings to light other events surrounding the attack that many people at the time, or for years after, were unaware of for one reason or another.  For example, when I first saw this movie as an eight or nine year old on TV years after it was made, I thought it was just one of those "war movie" fictions, and never a real event.  Which in hindsight, is a real shame.

 

Sepiatone

Yours is a very sensible and informative explanation. My sincerest thanks.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A major part of this so-called pre-WWII "naivete" mentality you folks speak of here, also of course known as "Isolationism", stemmed from the idea that most Americans of the time didn't wish their country to get involved into the affairs of Europe in particular and the drive toward the concept ultra-Nationalism which many of the counties of that continent had embarked upon at accelerated speed since the turn of 20th Century. Woodrow Wilson's failure to get Congressional approval for his own country's membership on his very own proposal of the The League of Nations being a good example of the American political winds of the time.

 

And then, after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the "political winds" did indeed change regarding American foreign policy, and with the thought that "We will never get caught with our pants down again" mindset becoming the overriding one, and which during the post-WWII era can be evidenced by the budget of the U.S. Military since that time and the overall mindset of the U.S, Government and probably the majority of its people being that it must be "The Policeman of the World" in order to ensure world stability, both politically and in ways of finance.

 

(...wow, did I just write all that???)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As a foreigner, there are things about the USA that go over my head, such as the fascination with 7 December 1941.

Why such devotion to Pearl Harbor? The USA and Japan have had perfect relations since the end of WWII, quite unlike what has been the case with the USA's ally during WWII, the very ornery and very ill tempered Soviet=Russian Bear.

Well I believe the fascination with Pearl Harbour stems from the need to remember, that regardless of the fact that we remain seperated (by large bodies of water) that many believed made us "safe", the sneak attack brought us to a reality the country hadn't faced since 1812.  I don't think the reminder has any context with our present day relations with Japan. 

 

You must remember that the USA was able to effectively neutralize Japan where such a thing was never possible with the Stalin regime.  Japan's complete neutralization effectively changed the Japanese/American relationship and even today the Japanese do not support any strengthening military and the effective pacifcation of the Japanese has resulted in several generations of Japanese unwilling to approach an increased military.   That may change with China's encroaching in the South China Sea but I really percieve a strong reluctance by them to consider major steps to militarization.

 

As for our relationship during WWII with Stalin, I believe that Roosevelt was truly duped by either his inner sense of confidence or Stalin's recognition of how easily he could be manipulated and none of the other Allied leaders believed that Stalin and consequently the USSR would ever achieve rapport with the other Allied countries.  Churchill, I believe, was the only one who truly understood Uncle Joe and his ultimate desire and only capitulated to Stalin's requests because without the USSR the western Allies would have had a much longer and costly war to overcome the Nazi's. 

 

Enough of this pontification.    But I encourage all who post here about WWII movies to read the history of the allied relationships during the interwar years and during WWII. 

 

Back to the movie topic "30 Minutes over Tokyo"   I also encourage readers to add Jeanne Bassinger's " The World War II Combat Film" to their library.  A wonderful new way to view combat films.   I cannot for the life of me understand why she has never been a guest programmer of even an Essentials personality...the depth of her knowledge to the Golden Era of Films is incomprable. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

 

...As for our relationship during WWII with Stalin, I believe that Roosevelt was truly duped by either his inner sense of confidence or Stalin's recognition of how easily he could be manipulated and none of the other Allied leaders believed that Stalin and consequently the USSR would ever achieve rapport with the other Allied countries.  Churchill, I believe, was the only one who truly understood Uncle Joe and his ultimate desire and only capitulated to Stalin's requests because without the USSR the western Allies would have had a much longer and costly war to overcome the Nazi's.

 

 

Ummmmmm...yeah.

 

AND probably because we "duped" Americans and the British and the rest of the Western Allies would have had to take up the "slack" of killing the approximately 2,230,000 German soldiers that Uncle Joe's soldiers did over the course of this conflict, while killing the approximate 373,000 German soldiers that the Western Allies accomplished during the same time.

 

Yeah, I'm thinking that might've "extended" this thing just "a bit" for us, alright.

 

(...I mean, it's probably no wonder that a few of the WWII movies we watch which are from the German perspective, often include a scene where some high ranking SS office will threaten some subordinate who's displeased him somehow by use of sending him to the Russian Front, ya know!!!!)

 

LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dargo....how right you are and just ask Colonel Klink and Sergant Schultz.....the Russian Front was Colonel Hogan's best conspirator. 

 


(...I mean, it's probably no wonder that a few of the WWII movies we watch which are from the German perspective, often include a scene where some high ranking SS office will threaten some subordinate who's displeased him somehow by use of sending him to the Russian Front, ya know!!!!)

 

LOL

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This film keeps showing, year after year, because it is a great well-made film.

 

The low-level flight to Tokyo is filmed so well, both inside the airplane and what we see outside.

 

During the bombing sequence, the "set" down below the airplane is a very large detailed model with mostly real model sized explosions of the buildings, filmed in slow motion so they will look "full sized". .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This film keeps showing, year after year, because it is a great well-made film.

 

The low-level flight to Tokyo is filmed so well, both inside the airplane and what we see outside.

 

During the bombing sequence, the "set" down below the airplane is a very large detailed model with mostly real model sized explosions of the buildings, filmed in slow motion so they will look "full sized". .

 

Well SURE, there's all THAT, but there's still ONE thing missing in this flick, if ya ask ME:

 

A shot of Richard Loo, yet again playing a Japanese officer, shaking his fist at the sky as those B-25s fly over his head in Tokyo!!!

 

(...always got'sta have my Richard Loo in these kind'sa movies, ya know) ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How aprapo the topic, even if several days following the movie, because yesterday and today there is a B-17 in town providing opportunites (for a princely sum) to take a ride in the aircraft. 

 

So without the cost I get to enjoy the sound of the engines and watch it fly overhead. I can fantasize from my mid-century home the experience my mother had of listening to my father's plane and squadrons take off in the early years of the war for night bombing runs over Germany.  While he didn't fly a B-17, the engines of his plane sound similar.     

 

So how cool is this I ask you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...