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Bare Thanksgiving Fare----


Sepiatone
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I've made this gripe before.  But since the last time, we've had many new members join us, and they too, may have the same complaint.

 

Back in that period of American history commonly known as "The Day",  Each major city had(and still has) their own big parade down a major street in the city.  AND sponsored by a major business in town.

 

In Detroit, it's now known as "The American Thanksgiving Day Parade",  sponsored by a large collection of local business contributors, but ART VAN furniture, long a Detroit area fixture, being major among them. 

 

Originally, the parade was annually sponsored by and largely funded by J.L.HUDSON'S, which for decades was sort of like the MACY'S of Detroit.  The irony being that since Hudson's fizzled out of business, all of their remaining(they imploded the downtown Detroit building back in 1998) locations are now occupied by MACY'S.

 

But, I'm here to lament the passing away of a long time tradition.

 

That is, the CHRISTMAS season kick-off.

 

NOW, people sadly see Thanksgiving day as a "kick-off" of the Christmas SHOPPING season, while back in "the day", it was the springboard for the Christmas SEASON.  You know, the decorating of houses and trees, playing Christmas carols on the home hi-fi, all the holiday baking, Christmas "specials" on TV, and THEN a BIT of shopping thrown in.  It is the TV fare I'm addressing.

 

For years, the parade in Detroit was televised by channel 4( WWJ-TV, now WDIV) the NBC affiliate.  And then afterwards, for many years, it'd be folowed by( for some odd reason) a presentation of the foreign short "THE RED BALLOON".  Could never figure out  WHY(since it had NO connection with the day or Christmas), but year after year, here it came!  And often followed by a Christmas based movie.  Many of the ones we here on the TCM boards hold dear.

 

I'd have to say that after the parade on Thanksgiving Day was the first time I ever saw them, and not until I was in early adolescence through to mid teens.  For instance-------

 

The first time I ever saw MIRACLE ON 34th STREET was on a Thanksgiving day.(1964)

 

Same for IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE(1966)

 

CHRISTMAS IN CONNECTICUT(1965)

 

A CHRISTMAS CAROLw/Alistair Sim(1967)

 

Over a scant few more years, others would be added(though not so great) like the musical vesion of SCROOGE with Albert Finney actually trying to SING!

 

But in more recent times, we've been treated to, instead of Christmas fare after the parade, showings of(for example) JURRASIC PARK,   FINAL DESTINATION,  FAST AND FURIOUS,  and the only time Christmas got mentioned this year, outside of an ad for a SALE somewhere, was in advertising the upcoming 50th anniversary of "A Charlie Brown Christmas".

 

Well, since I have the aforementioned Christmas movies on tape or disc, I can create my OWN "traditional" Thanksgiving, but somehow it's not the same. :(

 

Can ANYone else relate to this?

 

 

Sepiatone

 

 

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I've made this gripe before.  But since the last time, we've had many new members join us, and they too, may have the same complaint.

 

Back in that period of American history commonly known as "The Day",  Each major city had(and still has) their own big parade down a major street in the city.  AND sponsored by a major business in town.

 

In Detroit, it's now known as "The American Thanksgiving Day Parade",  sponsored by a large collection of local business contributors, but ART VAN furniture, long a Detroit area fixture, being major among them. 

 

Originally, the parade was annually sponsored by and largely funded by J.L.HUDSON'S, which for decades was sort of like the MACY'S of Detroit.  The irony being that since Hudson's fizzled out of business, all of their remaining(they imploded the downtown Detroit building back in 1998) locations are now occupied by MACY'S.

 

But, I'm here to lament the passing away of a long time tradition.

 

That is, the CHRISTMAS season kick-off.

 

NOW, people sadly see Thanksgiving day as a "kick-off" of the Christmas SHOPPING season, while back in "the day", it was the springboard for the Christmas SEASON.  You know, the decorating of houses and trees, playing Christmas carols on the home hi-fi, all the holiday baking, Christmas "specials" on TV, and THEN a BIT of shopping thrown in.  It is the TV fare I'm addressing.

 

For years, the parade in Detroit was televised by channel 4( WWJ-TV, now WDIV) the NBC affiliate.  And then afterwards, for many years, it'd be folowed by( for some odd reason) a presentation of the foreign short "THE RED BALLOON".  Could never figure out  WHY(since it had NO connection with the day or Christmas), but year after year, here it came!  And often followed by a Christmas based movie.  Many of the ones we here on the TCM boards hold dear.

 

I'd have to say that after the parade on Thanksgiving Day was the first time I ever saw them, and not until I was in early adolescence through to mid teens.  For instance-------

 

The first time I ever saw MIRACLE ON 34th STREET was on a Thanksgiving day.(1964)

 

Same for IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE(1966)

 

CHRISTMAS IN CONNECTICUT(1965)

 

A CHRISTMAS CAROLw/Alistair Sim(1967)

 

Over a scant few more years, others would be added(though not so great) like the musical vesion of SCROOGE with Albert Finney actually trying to SING!

 

But in more recent times, we've been treated to, instead of Christmas fare after the parade, showings of(for example) JURRASIC PARK,   FINAL DESTINATION,  FAST AND FURIOUS,  and the only time Christmas got mentioned this year, outside of an ad for a SALE somewhere, was in advertising the upcoming 50th anniversary of "A Charlie Brown Christmas".

 

Well, since I have the aforementioned Christmas movies on tape or disc, I can create my OWN "traditional" Thanksgiving, but somehow it's not the same. :(

 

Can ANYone else relate to this?

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Sorry but I read your post twice and I'm still not sure what your trying to get at as it relates to 'It is the TV fare I'm addressing'.

 

It appears you're saying this one T.V. Station in your local area has changed their Thanksgiving Day programming.    My brother-in-law always has the NFL games on (now 3 games when I believe there use to be only 2),   so I have no idea if the local stations in So Cal are showing less Christmas movies on Thanksgiving day or not.

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I've made this gripe before.  But since the last time, we've had many new members join us, and they too, may have the same complaint.

 

Back in that period of American history commonly known as "The Day",  Each major city had(and still has) their own big parade down a major street in the city.  AND sponsored by a major business in town.  In Detroit, it's now known as "The American Thanksgiving Day Parade",  sponsored by a large collection of local business contributors, but ART VAN furniture, long a Detroit area fixture, being major among them. Originally, the parade was annually sponsored by and largely funded by J.L.HUDSON'S, which for decades was sort of like the MACY'S of Detroit.  The irony being that since Hudson's fizzled out of business, all of their remaining(they imploded the downtown Detroit building back in 1998) locations are now occupied by MACY'S.

 

But, I'm here to lament the passing away of a long time tradition.

 

That is, the CHRISTMAS season kick-off.

 

NOW, people sadly see Thanksgiving day as a "kick-off" of the Christmas SHOPPING season, while back in "the day", it was the springboard for the Christmas SEASON.  You know, the decorating of houses and trees, playing Christmas carols on the home hi-fi, all the holiday baking, Christmas "specials" on TV, and THEN a BIT of shopping thrown in.  It is the TV fare I'm addressing.

 

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Sorry, I can't relate at all.

 

People have complained about the commericializing of Christmas for over a century. FDR himself wanted to move Thanksgiving a week earlier to promote more Christmas shopping ! And that was way back in 1939. Not sure when your "back in the day" was. And after that 2008 crash, we had stores promoting "christmas in July" in a desperate attempt to drum up business.

 

Where I live out west, parades are just another way to tie up traffic so you can't get where you want to go. The east coast can have them.

 

Television wouldn't survive if it didn't adjust to viewing attitudes of the viewers. Very few people under 50 sit and wait for a christmas show to come on. Or complain when it comes on. Young people go to a streaming device and watch it whenever they feel ready to do it. That's television today. Less and less people watch anything when it is actually shown. So why would it make a difference when it was scheduled ?

 

"Back in the day" there were only seven channels (or so). Now there are hundreds. And people are much less religious. I know more and more people who don't care about the holidays but, they watch tv. Have to provide programming for  them too. Less nuclear families these days also. And with that traditions have less influence.

 

As the old news reel says: Time marches on !

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I've made this gripe before.  But since the last time, we've had many new members join us, and they too, may have the same complaint.

 

Back in that period of American history commonly known as "The Day",  Each major city had(and still has) their own big parade down a major street in the city.  AND sponsored by a major business in town.

 

In Detroit, it's now known as "The American Thanksgiving Day Parade",  sponsored by a large collection of local business contributors, but ART VAN furniture, long a Detroit area fixture, being major among them. 

 

Originally, the parade was annually sponsored by and largely funded by J.L.HUDSON'S, which for decades was sort of like the MACY'S of Detroit.  The irony being that since Hudson's fizzled out of business, all of their remaining(they imploded the downtown Detroit building back in 1998) locations are now occupied by MACY'S.

 

But, I'm here to lament the passing away of a long time tradition.

 

That is, the CHRISTMAS season kick-off.

 

NOW, people sadly see Thanksgiving day as a "kick-off" of the Christmas SHOPPING season, while back in "the day", it was the springboard for the Christmas SEASON.  You know, the decorating of houses and trees, playing Christmas carols on the home hi-fi, all the holiday baking, Christmas "specials" on TV, and THEN a BIT of shopping thrown in.  It is the TV fare I'm addressing.

 

For years, the parade in Detroit was televised by channel 4( WWJ-TV, now WDIV) the NBC affiliate.  And then afterwards, for many years, it'd be folowed by( for some odd reason) a presentation of the foreign short "THE RED BALLOON".  Could never figure out  WHY(since it had NO connection with the day or Christmas), but year after year, here it came!  And often followed by a Christmas based movie.  Many of the ones we here on the TCM boards hold dear.

 

I'd have to say that after the parade on Thanksgiving Day was the first time I ever saw them, and not until I was in early adolescence through to mid teens.  For instance-------

 

The first time I ever saw MIRACLE ON 34th STREET was on a Thanksgiving day.(1964)

 

Same for IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE(1966)

 

CHRISTMAS IN CONNECTICUT(1965)

 

A CHRISTMAS CAROLw/Alistair Sim(1967)

 

Over a scant few more years, others would be added(though not so great) like the musical vesion of SCROOGE with Albert Finney actually trying to SING!

 

But in more recent times, we've been treated to, instead of Christmas fare after the parade, showings of(for example) JURRASIC PARK,   FINAL DESTINATION,  FAST AND FURIOUS,  and the only time Christmas got mentioned this year, outside of an ad for a SALE somewhere, was in advertising the upcoming 50th anniversary of "A Charlie Brown Christmas".

 

Well, since I have the aforementioned Christmas movies on tape or disc, I can create my OWN "traditional" Thanksgiving, but somehow it's not the same. :(

 

Can ANYone else relate to this?

 

 

Sepiatone

One Thanksgiving tradition, in Detroit, that you did not mention, is the Lions playing, and it's always nationally televised. This year, you had something to actually celebrate the holiday. 

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One Thanksgiving tradition, in Detroit, that you did not mention, is the Lions playing, and it's always nationally televised. This year, you had something to actually celebrate the holiday. 

 

 Well Lion fans shouldn't celebrate too much for beating that awful Eagles team.    That wasn't an eagle I saw on that field yesterday but instead a turkey!       Chip is headed towards the chipper.

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 Well Lion fans shouldn't celebrate too much for beating that awful Eagles team.    That wasn't an eagle I saw on that field yesterday but instead a turkey!       Chip is headed towards the chipper.

Yes, but the way the Lions are playing now is more representative of the talent on the team than was their performance earlier in the season.

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I've made this gripe before.  But since the last time, we've had many new members join us, and they too, may have the same complaint.

 

 

 

 

 

But, I'm here to lament the passing away of a long time tradition.

 

That is, the CHRISTMAS season kick-off.

 

NOW, people sadly see Thanksgiving day as a "kick-off" of the Christmas SHOPPING season, while back in "the day", it was the springboard for the Christmas SEASON.  You know, the decorating of houses and trees, playing Christmas carols on the home hi-fi, all the holiday baking, Christmas "specials" on TV, and THEN a BIT of shopping thrown in.  It is the TV fare I'm addressing.

 

 

I'd have to say that after the parade on Thanksgiving Day was the first time I ever saw them, and not until I was in early adolescence through to mid teens.  For instance-------

 

The first time I ever saw MIRACLE ON 34th STREET was on a Thanksgiving day.(1964)

 

Same for IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE(1966)

 

CHRISTMAS IN CONNECTICUT(1965)

 

A CHRISTMAS CAROLw/Alistair Sim(1967)

 

Over a scant few more years, others would be added(though not so great) like the musical vesion of SCROOGE with Albert Finney actually trying to SING!

 

 

Well, since I have the aforementioned Christmas movies on tape or disc, I can create my OWN "traditional" Thanksgiving, but somehow it's not the same. :(

 

Can ANYone else relate to this?

 

 

Sepiatone

Your Day must have been  my Day, Sepiatone.    I'm trying my best to keep the Christmas spirit alive in that old time tradition at my house.  I decorated today, I think  it looks great in a slightly gaudy sort of way, and I can't wait for it to get dark so I can turn the multitude of multi-colored lights on outside. I'm a firm believer that tasteful and Christmas don't belong in the same sentence. I did zero shopping.  Black Friday would remain red if it was up to me.  Tonight, I plan to play my DVD of "Remember the Night." I agree though, that it's not the same as watching a good Christmas movie on TV along with the rest of the country.

 

Don't anyone tell me about different shows for different people who have different tastes or different beliefs.  They have things to watch.  We have dozens of sports stations, over fifty music stations, fantasy, horror and science-fiction movies galore, enough crime dramas to fill a hundred emergency rooms with victims and another hundred shows  about the emergency rooms,  comedy or what passes for it, endless reality housewives drinking wine and bickering, brides trying on clothes 24 hours a day,  QVC and  twenty other commercials posing as shows, and people cooking, oh my gosh, I never knew there were so many people cooking.  I'm only asking for one or two stations to play the old classic Christmas shows, even if it's just Rudolph.  Come on.

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Your Day must have been  my Day, Sepiatone.    I'm trying my best to keep the Christmas spirit alive in that old time tradition at my house.  I decorated today, I think  it looks great in a slightly gaudy sort of way, and I can't wait for it to get dark so I can turn the multitude of multi-colored lights on outside. I'm a firm believer that tasteful and Christmas don't belong in the same sentence. I did zero shopping.  Black Friday would remain red if it was up to me.  Tonight, I plan to play my DVD of "Remember the Night." I agree though, that it's not the same as watching a good Christmas movie on TV along with the rest of the country.

 

Don't anyone tell me about different shows for different people who have different tastes or different beliefs.  They have things to watch.  We have dozens of sports stations, over fifty music stations, fantasy, horror and science-fiction movies galore, enough crime dramas to fill a hundred emergency rooms with victims and another hundred shows  about the emergency rooms,  comedy or what passes for it, endless reality housewives drinking wine and bickering, brides trying on clothes 24 hours a day,  QVC and  twenty other commercials posing as shows, and people cooking, oh my gosh, I never knew there were so many people cooking.  I'm only asking for one or two stations to play the old classic Christmas shows, even if it's just Rudolph.  Come on.

 

Get-TV is featuring old T.V. variety shows with Christmas themes.     e.g. the Perry Como,  Judy Garland or Andy Williams Christmas special and their various Christmas episodes.        If no station is showing the old classic Christmas shows you want it must mean that no station believes there is enough of an audience for this type of programming and therefore renting DVDs or using the Internet would be the only options available.  

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I'm just going to comment on the Thanksgiving Parade part. Richmond Va, always had it at night on Broad Street. It was a tradition to go shopping Downtown, have lunch and end the night seeing Santa at the end of the Parade. In later years it became a day time thing, then fizzled out or was moved. So as the old folks say, "things do change."

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Well, gee.....

 

I'm sorry for confusing all of you with such plain and simple English!

 

All I was saying was that in times gone by, on Thanksgiving Day, and usually after  the parade, TV would offer Christmas themed movies to watch while waiting for the turkey to be served.

 

Sure, there was and still IS football, but as this is a MOVIE based forum, I thought you'd all be able to stay on track.....guessed wrong, it seems...

 

And anyway too, MY "back in the day" in this instance was the early to mid 1960's (I believe the movie titles I posted indicated  this).  And not only "this one station", but the OTHER two stations (at the time) would also program some "holiday fare" on the day.  At least, up until evening(or when "the game" came on). And even with the advent of cable coming here in the early '80's, there, even on the CABLE stations on Thanksgiving were SOME holiday flicks being shown  It was during the past 20 or so years I've noticed the programming of such fare  dwindling slowly to non existence.

 

And, to GGGGERALD:

 

I don't know what period YOUR "Back in the day" covers, but up until the early '70's in the Detroit area, when the number of UHF stations increased from ONE to THREE, MY "back in the day" mid 1960's only offered THREE stations(four, if you want to include the CBC station we could pick up being broadcast from Windsor Ont. just across the Detroit River, but being Canadian, didn't HAVE Thanksgiving Day programming like WE did). 

 

We really didn't have much of ANY UHF broadcasting then, except for WTVS(a PBS station) and in 1965, the introduction of WKBD.  But, as many of the families in the area had older TV sets WITHOUT UHF capability, the use of an adapter of some sort was required, and they were a bother to use, and anyway neither UHF station EVER offered any Christmas programming on Thanksgiving until the '70's.

 

All in all too, I dislike the use of "turkey day" to referrence Thanksgiving Day.  As I stated(SOMEwhere), it sounds too much like "baby talk" and sounds instead like it should be a day in which we HONOR turkeys by NOT eating them.  I mean, you don't boil and eat the flag on FLAG DAY, do ya?  And what do YOU serve for dinner on VETERAN'S DAY?   ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

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Well, gee.....

 

I'm sorry for confusing all of you with such plain and simple English!

 

All I was saying was that in times gone by, on Thanksgiving Day, and usually after  the parade, TV would offer Christmas themed movies to watch while waiting for the turkey to be served.

 

Sure, there was and still IS football, but as this is a MOVIE based forum, I thought you'd all be able to stay on track.....guessed wrong, it seems...

 

And anyway too, MY "back in the day" in this instance was the early to mid 1960's (I believe the movie titles I posted indicated  this).  And not only "this one station", but the OTHER two stations (at the time) would also program some "holiday fare" on the day.  At least, up until evening(or when "the game" came on). And even with the advent of cable coming here in the early '80's, there, even on the CABLE stations on Thanksgiving were SOME holiday flicks being shown  It was during the past 20 or so years I've noticed the programming of such fare  dwindling slowly to non existence.

 

And, to GGGGERALD:

 

I don't know what period YOUR "Back in the day" covers, but up until the early '70's in the Detroit area, when the number of UHF stations increased from ONE to THREE, MY "back in the day" mid 1960's only offered THREE stations(four, if you want to include the CBC station we could pick up being broadcast from Windsor Ont. just across the Detroit River, but being Canadian, didn't HAVE Thanksgiving Day programming like WE did). 

 

We really didn't have much of ANY UHF broadcasting then, except for WTVS(a PBS station) and in 1965, the introduction of WKBD.  But, as many of the families in the area had older TV sets WITHOUT UHF capability, the use of an adapter of some sort was required, and they were a bother to use, and anyway neither UHF station EVER offered any Christmas programming on Thanksgiving until the '70's.

 

All in all too, I dislike the use of "turkey day" to referrence Thanksgiving Day.  As I stated(SOMEwhere), it sounds too much like "baby talk" and sounds instead like it should be a day in which we HONOR turkeys by NOT eating them.  I mean, you don't boil and eat the flag on FLAG DAY, do ya?  And what do YOU serve for dinner on VETERAN'S DAY?   ;)

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Hey, you asked if I could related to this and my answer was NO.      Anyone that wants to watch Christmas films can access them using many different ways.   One can do this in April,  November or December.   

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Hey, you asked if I could related to this and my answer was NO.      Anyone that wants to watch Christmas films can access them using many different ways.   One can do this in April,  November or December.   

Actually, YOUR answer was that you didn't understand the question!  And it wasn't  just  the one station in Detroit, it was ALL THREE which would offer this programming on Thanksgiving.  It was just channel 4 offered the better choices.  ;)

 

Yeah, I know I came off a bit snippy, and I apologize for that

 

But, the point being( which I thought  WAS clear) that television has changed as far as Thanksgiving Day programming is concerned.  And I was just wondering if it was the same for people living in other areas, or if anyone even bothered to notice.  And I also mentioned that several of the "holiday" or Christmas movies we hold dear here in the forum were first SEEN by me on a Thanksgiving Day AFTER the parades.  And that lately, that's changed a lot.  Like, it seemed some stations felt we'd get right into the "holiday spirit" with a viewing of FAST FIVE or FINAL DESTINATION!   Plus, please consider this......

 

Not EVERYONE has access to any movie they want at anytime.  You're presumptuously  assuming EVERYONE has cable service, DVD and VHS players.  I know several folks who STILL don't use a simple "flip" cell phone.  NO cable service OR disc or tape player.  It was a amjor chore to get them to invest in a DIGITAL antenna, due to that idiotic law. So......

 

Not EVERYONE who wants to watch Christmas films can access them by using ANY one of the services that might require the possession of some overpriced electronic device that everyone who took a BIG gulp of THAT Kool-ade seems to own. And therefore THEY don't have that open to them.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Actually, YOUR answer was that you didn't understand the question!  And it wasn't  just  the one station in Detroit, it was ALL THREE which would offer this programming on Thanksgiving.  It was just channel 4 offered the better choices.  ;)

 

Yeah, I know I came off a bit snippy, and I apologize for that

 

But, the point being( which I thought  WAS clear) that television has changed as far as Thanksgiving Day programming is concerned.  And I was just wondering if it was the same for people living in other areas, or if anyone even bothered to notice.  And I also mentioned that several of the "holiday" or Christmas movies we hold dear here in the forum were first SEEN by me on a Thanksgiving Day AFTER the parades.  And that lately, that's changed a lot.  Like, it seemed some stations felt we'd get right into the "holiday spirit" with a viewing of FAST FIVE or FINAL DESTINATION!   Plus, please consider this......

 

Not EVERYONE has access to any movie they want at anytime.  You're presumptuously  assuming EVERYONE has cable service, DVD and VHS players.  I know several folks who STILL don't use a simple "flip" cell phone.  NO cable service OR disc or tape player.  It was a amjor chore to get them to invest in a DIGITAL antenna, due to that idiotic law. So......

 

Not EVERYONE who wants to watch Christmas films can access them by using ANY one of the services that might require the possession of some overpriced electronic device that everyone who took a BIG gulp of THAT Kool-ade seems to own. And therefore THEY don't have that open to them.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

To me Gerald addressed your main question;  There is less Christmas programming on "over-the-air" type T.V. stations due to less interest especially by the under 40s demographic.      

 

So yes,  that means that those that can't afford to pay for alternative methods of delivery may miss out.   But this is just the nature of capitalism instead of some type of war on Christmas as defined by Fox.    Oh, and if Fox is so concerned they can schedule this type of programming on there over-the-air stations.   But they don't because it doesn't make money. 

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Sepiatone quote:


Not EVERYONE who wants to watch Christmas films can access them by using ANY one of the services that might require the possession of some overpriced electronic device that everyone who took a BIG gulp of THAT Kool-ade seems to own. And therefore THEY don't have that open to them.

 

I know I get tired of people saying I can just buy the DVD of anything I want to watch. I'm already paying a small monthly fortune for cable to get 1500 channels, so I dislike having to buy a movie in addition to that, just for something to watch.  I feel the same way about Netflix.  I don't like buckling to their conditions, particularly after they caused the closing of all the video rental places I used to enjoy. We do have a DVD/ VHS player but it requires using three remote controls to set up and it's almost impossible to record with, so if something I want to see comes on at two in the morning I know I wont be seeing it.  It's just aggravating to keep paying more but seeming to actually have less. All I really want is to be able to sit down at 8:00 and find something good to watch on TV.

 

I'm also with you on the electronics Kool-Aid everyone seems to have been imbibing.  I just priced IPads for the first time as a Christmas gift and was just amazed.  Hundreds of dollars to play Angry Bird? I'm not on Facebook. I still haven't bought a mobile phone.  The last thing I want  is to "stay connected," while I'm out shopping.  I like to be with the people I'm actually with.

 

 

 

 

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Actually-----

 

JAMES: still kind of missing the point, which was my lamenting about how in many cases( I HAVE met some who hail from another state whose "big city" local TV stations also used to program some Christmas movies after the televised local parade) who also noticed that "back home" it seems to have gone by the wayside.

 

I'm more or less referring to what was, in many places, an annual Thanksgiving Day "tradition" that's been abandoned, NOT how available Christmas movies are.

 

ANDREA:  You might appreciate the absurdity of this:---Speaking of Thanksgiving, this past Thanksgiving Day I was sitting in my sister-in-law's kitchen with eight other people.  Nine of us in all.  SEVEN of these people were"nose-diving" into their smart phones, and NOT socializing with anyone else in the room( in fact, they all seemed OBLIVIOUS  to any other presence).  The amusing thing about this was....EACH ONE of them(and I skirted around the room to peek) were on "SOCIAL MEDIA"!  :D

I guess what really amused me about it all was how "slack-jawed" all their facial expressions were.

 

 

Sepiatone

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Actually-----

 

JAMES: still kind of missing the point, which was my lamenting about how in many cases( I HAVE met some who hail from another state whose "big city" local TV stations also used to program some Christmas movies after the televised local parade) who also noticed that "back home" it seems to have gone by the wayside.

 

I'm more or less referring to what was, in many places, an annual Thanksgiving Day "tradition" that's been abandoned, NOT how available Christmas movies are.

 

ANDREA:  You might appreciate the absurdity of this:---Speaking of Thanksgiving, this past Thanksgiving Day I was sitting in my sister-in-law's kitchen with eight other people.  Nine of us in all.  SEVEN of these people were"nose-diving" into their smart phones, and NOT socializing with anyone else in the room( in fact, they all seemed OBLIVIOUS  to any other presence).  The amusing thing about this was....EACH ONE of them(and I skirted around the room to peek) were on "SOCIAL MEDIA"!  :D

I guess what really amused me about it all was how "slack-jawed" all their facial expressions were.

 

 

Sepiatone

 

You're correct that I don't know what your discussing here.     In the OP you said  'It is the TV fare I'm addressing'.

 

Then you listed many Christmas films.     I admit I don't know of any type of Thanksgiving related  'TV fare other than the parade programing (which was shown on my local stations but I didn't watch it).

 

I really do hope that you get what you wish for but these times are a changing,,,,, 

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