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Best depressing (but GOOD) movie


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I?d say ?I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang?.

 

Paul Muni is so good in that film. Mr. Hard-Working Average Guy, with no way to win.

 

I can stand the sadness of this film because Muni keeps telling people that what he is going through is unjust. That makes the film viewable to me.

 

I also saw him in ?We Are Not Alone? and that was depressing too, but for some reason it was more frustrating to me. I?ll never watch it again. I think it was because he never got a real chance to say that what happened to him was unjust.

 

So, the first film mentioned was able to help other people, but the second film helped no one and was just a big bummer.

 

The Fugitive Kind was a big bummer too. I watch it about once ever 5 years. But the end is terrible.

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Waterloo Bridge is one of my favorites. It gives me such a depressed feeling afterwards. There is such great chemistry between Robert Taylor and Vivien Leigh and their characters are so sweet that you really hope for them to be together but it ends so tragically...

 

Also there is Camille with Robert Taylor again. He has a way of acting like he's in love that makes you so sad when he loses the one he loves...

 

And even though it's a comedy, Roman Holiday is kind of depressing in a fitting way. You know it's the right ending but you can't help but wish that when Gregory Peck is walking down that long corridor that Audrey's character will come running after him.

 

Message was edited by:

myfairlady84

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I don?t get Waterloo Bridge at all. So the girl?s boyfriend or husband goes off to war, and the only option in all of England that is available to any girl in her position is to become a prostitute on Waterloo Bridge?

 

That doesn?t even make any sense. I just don?t get it.

 

I mean, can?t she get a job as a store clerk and find another boyfriend?

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> I don?t get Waterloo Bridge at all. So the girl?s

> boyfriend or husband goes off to war, and the only

> option in all of England that is available to any

> girl in her position is to become a prostitute on

> Waterloo Bridge?

>

> That doesn?t even make any sense. I just don?t get

> it.

>

> I mean, can?t she get a job as a store clerk and find

> another boyfriend?

 

Her friend is sick so she needs to make quick money for doctors, medicines, rent, and food.

 

A lot of the jobs that later generations came to think as feminine occupations (bank teller, secretary) were not yet available for a woman during WWI. Available jobs like shop girl positions were often so poorly paid that women frequently slid into prostitution.

 

Plus, she was a ballet dancer so she didn't have any other really commercial skills. Also, during WWI, being on the stage in any form was still considered disreputable so prejudice may have kept her from being hired even as a shopgirl.

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The movie "They Shoot Horses, Don't They?" (1969), as mentioned here below, is depressing yet one of my favorites.

The acting is superb and the theme of the 1930s dance marathon is fascinating.

Also in this category, favorites are, "Titanic" (1997), "The Trip to Bountiful" (1985), "One Potato, Two Potato" (1964), "Lost in Yonkers" (1993), "The Grapes of Wrath" (1940), etc.

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I guess this thread might be entitled "Hurts So Good", (apologies to fans of john cougar mellencramp)...

 

Here's a few deliciously sad flicks:

 

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn(1947).

It's a tossup. Do I usually turn on the waterworks during the scene where the Mother (Dorothy Maguire) tells her husband somewhat ruefully that she's pregnant again or when the girl (Peggy Ann Garner) talks to her father (James Dunn--in a gloriously hopeless turn as a lovable, idealistic failure), just before Christmas about her hopes for the future or when the girl helps her mother during childbirth or the scene when she finds flowers on her desk on her graduation day from...(sob--i'm actually tearing up)...sniff, sniff, you get the idea. Beautiful, understated acting here from all concerned, though Joan Blondell and Lloyd Nolan deserve special mention too.

 

How Green Was My Valley(1941)

Gorgeous b & w cinematography, great casting from Donald Crisp, Sara Allgood, Roddy McDowell, to Rhys Williams and Arthur Shields and the simply told tale of a family's inevitable dissolution. Heartbreaking in a completely satisfying way.

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I have to agree, moira---A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN---hurts so good. Gosh, I loved the book, too.

 

Actually, I think that John Cougar Mellencamp owes everyone an apology for the VIDEO to Hurts So Good.

 

Sandy K

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> Anything from Ingmar Bergman

>

 

Carl Dreyer, too, particularly Day of Wrath and Passion of Joan of Arc. These movies take you so far down that there's almost a perverse thrill in the way that Dreyer manipulates emotions (both yours and his actors).

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Hi Bobbert, Would you mind telling us a little more about Vredens Dag ("Day of Wrath")? It looks as if Mr. Dreyer didn't take director's credit (no one did?). Do you know what the story behind that is?

 

I've seen his ethereal Passion of Joan of Arc (with the San Francisco Symphony accompanying it). Since this was done 15 years previous, I imagine the visual style could be quite different. Do you see a linear tie (visually or thematically) between the two movies?

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I loved those movies you mentioned ,great stories I always cry when the girl gets flowers from her aunt on behalf of her father at her graduation .Sophie's choice with Meryle Streep it is not a terriably old movie but this one is really depressing when you find out what choice she had to make,it is gut wrenching.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Two Steinbeck derived films-How Green Was My Valley,and Of Mice and Men directed by Lewis Milestone.Why has't there been a DVD of the Heisler directed version of The Biscuit Eater?

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  • 2 weeks later...

The Yearling.

I would like to be able to watch it from start to finish, but I can't.

It's a very fine film, I just can't look at it.

I saw it when I was a child, and it upset me so much, that my mother said if I didn't snap out of it, I would not be going to the movies again the next Saturday.

When I was grown and it was on TV in New York City, I thought, good, now I can fully appreciate it.

It wasn't on 20 minutes and I could take no more.

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I love the movies that you've named and RebeccaDeWinter's mention of The Yearling reminded me that while I can get swept away in the majestic sadness of something such as How Green Was My Valley, there are certain movies that just cut a little too close to the bone, even when I realize that they are well made.

 

The Grapes of Wrath is one of them. I guess it might be because John Ford laid on the sentiment without dipping his toe into the sentimentality for once in this story. Or, I suppose because my own family mirrored the Joad's journey from the rural to the urban as part of the immigrant diaspora from Europe to America. Rationally, it was probably for the best, of course, since it meant that a.) they stopped starving, and b.) they got an education, socially and academically. Yet, this trip over about two generations still can't erase what the French call nostalgia pour la bouie. Basically, the meaning is that even when one knows better, "a duck who thinks itself a swan will find itself longing for the mud in which it was laid" or what one believes emotionally was a simpler time, closer to nature.

 

I know it's probably one of the more brilliant performances that I've ever seen on film, but despite good intentions, I just can't watch The Pawnbroker with Rod Steiger in its entirety. It's just too searingly sad. That's kind of how I feel about the flurry of fictionalized September 11th films that are now emerging from the maw of Hollywood. I still can't watch any more of the news footage. Wish that the media would show more discretion in its use, but that doesn't seem to be the way of the world.

 

When do you think that a depressing film goes from being cathartic to debilitating? Are there some films that you know are good but unwatchable?

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  • 5 months later...

The Yearling and Penny Serenade were two classics that came to my mind... What about the silent Uncle Tom's Cabin? First time I watched that was really something (as the first silent film I had ever watched).

As modern movies go, I cannot sit through the Drew Barrymore flick Riding In Cars With Boys. I find it so depressing... :(

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