Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Valentino


Recommended Posts

Hello to anyone and all.

I finally got to see a Valentino movie the other night and I missed the ending. I could just scream. It was incredible. watching the special effects and the symbolism. The movie was "The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. I can't remember the last time a silent movie caught my attention so completely. The last part I saw was the four horsemen retreating in the sky. I know there was more after that but due to technical difficulties I missed it. Can anyone do justice in describing the end for me?

Also. I would like to know more about Valentino. Why did he not make the transition to "talkies" ? If you have any answers for me I would love to know.

Thanks

drummerof

Link to post
Share on other sites

Rex Ingram's THE FOUR HORSEMEN OF THE APOCYLPSE (1921) is a truly great motion picture! It has not been released on official DVD yet. However, I have a high quality DVD-R program which I designed, of this film with a 17 page menu! Perhaps you would be interested in a copy?

 

Sadly, Valentino never made a single talkie. He died in 1926!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just saw that film for the first time the other night, and really enjoyed it.

 

I had been curious for a long while about the big dancing scene that turned Valentino into an instant smash with the women of the world....and I have to say that it did not disappoint.

 

He was great.

 

Wish he'd lived longer though. Died WAY too young.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Meaning no disrespect to Valentino, I wonder if he would have made the transition to sound if he'd lived. His type of roles were dwindling by the late 20's, and having an accent, I fear he'd be assigned to gangster roles or "heavies."

 

So many excellent actors & actresses didn't make the transition...due to style, inability to change their acting, accents...etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites

John Gilbert starred with Virginia Bruce in Downstairs, so my guess is that if it had been both Valentino and Gilbert faced with the new technology maybe both would have fared better. My question would be would he be paired with a new and maybe younger co-star, possibly one that had made one or two movies, like Fay Wray. Fay Wray filmed with Wallace Berry ealier in the thirities.

I think with Valentino the deciding factor would have been Pola Negri and I have a copy of her autobiography, Memoirs of a Star. Negri and Valentino could have filmed together. With the recent release of Beyond the Rocks why didn't Swanson do as well as Crawford and Lorretta Young? Maybe Valentino would have starred with Lorretta Young.

They did try to put Barrymore with Garbo! So maybe your'e asking if Barrymore "ruined hollywood" or if he's the only one that was trained well enough out of the Pickford, Fairbanks marquee, but you really would need an Orson Wells to answer the question and then a Billy Wilder to reask it, but if you want to make the question as mysterious as Garbo and Scott Fitzgerald, they also tried to put Louise Brooks into sound.

There's something cool to read The Grammar of Film by Raymond Spottiswoode near to the chapter The Advent of Sound and its funny to find film critics from 1931 writing that the technology of sound would hamper its aesthetics; that film wasn't meant to be sound because of its inherent pictorial quality.

 

Good luck,

Scott

Link to post
Share on other sites

drummerof,

 

Yes, I am interested if it will let me see the entire ending. Besides it is just a great movie.

 

drummerof

 

Yes, you will see the entire movie! You can contact me direct, at the link provided herein. Hope to hear from you soon!

 

I 'm convinced that I have about as many Silent films, as your likely to find almost anywhere! About 70% or more of those titles, I have already authored to DVD-R! So let me know what else you may be looking for, and I may very well be able to accomadate you?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Valentino would have been ok in sound films. He was a Latin Lover and that type hung on for a long time. He might not have been the romantic lead--maybe the other man in a love triangle, the one that tempts the girl, but doesn;t get her in the end. Also, he seemed to have a sense of humor about himself in his movies--a kind of self mockery which would have gone over pretty well in the 30's, I think. That was something John Gilbert lacked in his silents. When he fell in love, he meant it, totally and that wouldn't have gone over well in the cynical 30's.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

I have a few comments to make regarding the past few threads about

Valentino, John Gilbert and Clara Bow. I believe that Valentino would have

been able to make the move to talkies; not as a leading man but as a secondary

lead. The real Valentino was more down to earth and with a sense of humor.

He wasn't crazy about the roles he played but this was how the public wanted

to see him. I also believe that John Gilbert would have been able to carve a new

niche for himself in talkies if he had not been so serious and passionate about

himself. I could see him acting in the types of roles that William Powell played

during his tenure at MGM in the 1930's; suave and sophisticated comedy.

I don't agree that Clara Bows voice led to her demise in films. Her Brooklyn

accent perfectly fit her personna. There were many reasons for her departure:

her scandal with her secretary Daisy Devoe, her fragile mental health and her own

lack of interest in making talkies. I saw her in "Kick-In" last summer and she was

fantastic in an unusual dramatic role. She was also excellent in "Call Her Savage".

Link to post
Share on other sites

I can sort of see Valentino playing roles that Jean Hersholdt sometimes played, like the foreign born doctor (Men in White) or gangster (Beast of the City). If he played the lover at all, it would have been the slick, you-really-can't-trust-this-man type of lover.

Link to post
Share on other sites

he would have had the same problem that Clara Bow had with her NYC accent. After sound came, fans were disappointed by what she sounded like, and her career started to end.

 

 

I read just the opposite--that fans were OK with her voice because it fit her persona. I thought it was her nervous breakdowns that contributed to her ending her career?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a quick heads-up to everyone. Delta is releasing The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse toward the end of this month. The DVD will also include a documentary on Valentino. However, Delta is a budget company and the disc will probably not have the clarity and quality of the Turner broadcast.

 

Another heads-up for those interested: Valentino's Camille, starring Navimova (Valentino was not a star yet) was release as the "B" side of the Garbo Camille. Turner released it with minimal fan-fare. I discovered it by accident. It has a brand new "Young Composers" score and is mastered from the very best surviving material for the film.

 

Roy

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 10 months later...

THE REASON THAT VALENTINO DIDN'T MAKE THE TRANSITION TO THE TALKIES IS BECAUSE HE DIED BEFORE HE HAD THE CHANCE. HE HAD APENDICITIS AND IT BURST AND POISONED HIM. HE WAS VERY UNHAPPY AT THE TIME BECAUSE HIS WIFE HAD LEFT HIM. WE NEED A DOCUMENTARY ON HIS LIFE FOR POSTERITY. NEW GENERATIONS DON'T KNOW ABOUT HIM. THE ENTIRE WORLD MOURNED HIS DEATH.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you look at the silent stars who made the transition to talkies successfully, people like Greta Garbo and Joan Crawford, they had studios behind them that were committed to maintaining and developing their careers and they got the good parts that allowed their careers to thrive. John Gilbert did not get that support. Whether Valentino would have made it would have had very little to do with his ability.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2022 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...