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LawrenceA

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1941 Favorites (alphabetical)
 
Citizen Kane

Just because. We need a Citizen Murdoch film for today.
 
Hold Back the Dawn

Is there any classic movie that's more timely today? Show this one to Donald Trump.
 
How Green Was My Valley

A Fordian gem, with all his trimmings and values.
 
King of the Zombies

Oscar nominated for its score, this movie was the first video I ever purchased (from Video Yesteryear), even before I had a VCR. A model of low-budget delights. What would we do without Monogram and its ilk? "Tahama cooks for the living, not the dead." Tahama is played by Madame Sul-Te-Wan, the first black actress to sign a film contract. Leigh Whipper, the first black member of Actors' Equity, is also in the cast, as is the great Mantan Moreland. Pure thrills, chills, and fun; and it follows the zombie rules set forth by Seabrook in his seminal book, The Magic Island (e.g. zombies can't have salt). "If there one thing I wouldn't wanna be twice, zombies is both of them!"
 
The Lady Eve
I'm not a big Stanwyck fan, though I think she's ok, and I like many of her movies. I once said something about BS that so insulted a fellow poster here that I received a PM from another poster telling me that the lady in question was so offended, she may leave the board. (The lady in question came back). I'm not much of a Preston Sturges fan either. But The Lady Eve is something special, a wonderful ensemble film. It would have been even better if the great Kate played the lead -- but don't tell anyone I said that: "Silence! To the grave -- and even beyond!"
 

Major Barbara
I saw the BFI's restored print of this a few years ago. A great film, directed by Gabriel Pascal, with screenplay by GBS, the playwright himself! Among the technical/creative staff are people like Ronald Neame, David Lean, Vincent Korda, Cecil Beaton. Music by William Walton. Made whilst the German bombs were dropping all around them. 
 
Sergeant York

Just wonderful. This film has it all, plus Margaret Wycherley's great performance as Mother York (I know, she's very good as Ma Jarrett, and as Mrs. Deventer, but she's perfect as Mother York.) One of the screen's great supporting performances.

 
Shanghai Gesture
Don't laugh -- I love this film. Imperfect but ambitious and fun. Surreal beyond belief, and with a cast that includes Eric Blore in an unusual performance.
 
The Shepherd of the Hills

A sort of follow up to Henry Hathaway's brilliant Trail of the Lonesome Pine. This movie is one of my favorite John Wayne films -- maybe because it's not a typical Wayne film. The scene when Granny Becky (Marjorie Main) gets her sight back and confronts Aunt Mollie (Beulah Bondi) is riveting. Beulah's scene with the ring of fire, late in the movie, is eerie -- another side to one of Hollywood's greatest actresses.

 

So Ends Our Night
Somber, important movie.
 
The Wolf Man
"The way you walked was thorny though no fault of your own, but as the rain enters the soil, the river enters the sea, so tears run to a predestined end." By the predestined end, I realized this was a pretty good movie, though, IMHO, not as good as Werewolf of London, but tops by 1941 standards.

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Interesting choices, Swithin. KING OF THE ZOMBIES was a surprise discovery for me when I watched a cheap box-set of public domain horror titles some years ago. I enjoyed it. I saw HOLD BACK THE DAWN, but it's been so long I don't recall the Trump significance you mention. MAJOR BARBARA is one I've tried taping before, but it failed for one reason or another. I'm still intent on seeing it. I also want to see SHANGHAI GESTURE despite its reputation, since I'm a Gene Tierney fan. SO ENDS OUR NIGHT I haven't heard of.

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Interesting choices, Swithin. KING OF THE ZOMBIES was a surprise discovery for me when I watched a cheap box-set of public domain horror titles some years ago. I enjoyed it. I saw HOLD BACK THE DAWN, but it's been so long I don't recall the Trump significance you mention. MAJOR BARBARA is one I've tried taping before, but it failed for one reason or another. I'm still intent on seeing it. I also want to see SHANGHAI GESTURE despite its reputation, since I'm a Gene Tierney fan. SO ENDS OUR NIGHT I haven't heard of.

 

Hold Back the Dawn is about immigrants that try to cheat their way into gaining legal residency.    e.g.  a pregnant women waits by the Mexican \ US border and when she is just about to give birth uses tricky means to ensure her child is born on US soil.  

 

The star of the film,  Charles Boyer,  marries clueless Olivia Dehavilland,  who is a US citizen,  only so he can gain entry to the USA so he can scam rich folks out of money.        There are similar stunts by others.    BUT the movie portrays all of these stories (well except the Boyer one),  as America is so great that one can't fault these immigrants for doing whatever they can do to gain entry.

 

But hey, I like the film regardless of the political angle, since the three main stars are really good;  Paulette Goddard playing the lover of Boyer and his partner in the scams to rip off rich folks.

 

(PS:  Olivia was nominated for best actress but loss to sister Joan.  Some saying this event started their feud).

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Nice list, Swithin. 

 

I've praised MAJOR BARBARA in other posts on other threads. I should have included it as an honorable mention. Great cast, and the story (like most of Shaw's stories) is thoughtful and funny. 

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Hold Back the Dawn is about immigrants that try to cheat their way into gaining legal residency.    e.g.  a pregnant women waits by the Mexican \ US border and when she is just about to give birth uses tricky means to ensure her child is born on US soil.  

Yes -- it's about desperate people trying to find a better world. Like the pilgrims.

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It's imperative to remember that it's favorites and not necessarily the best films. The two don't always match up for me.

 

That's how I rank all my lists.  I prefer seeing what others personally like versus attempting to be objective.  It's a great way to learn a person.

 

1941

 

1. Citizen Kane

2. The Devil and Daniel Webster

3. The Maltese Falcon

4. High Sierra

5. Man Hunt

6. Mr. and Mrs. Smith

7. Meet John Doe

8. The Shepherd of the Hills

9. I Wake Up Screaming

10. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

11. Suspicion

12. Blues in the Night

13. Rage in Heaven

14. How Green Was My Valley

15. All Through the Night

16. The Lady Eve

17. Western Union

18. Nothing But the Truth

19. Johnny Eager

20. Out of the Fog

21. The Wolf Man

22. Ball of Fire

23. Dumbo

24. Two-Faced Woman

25. Among the Living

26. The Strawberry Blonde

27. Texas

28. The Sea Wolf

29. The Shanghai Gesture

30. Honk-y Tonk

31. Come Live with Me

32. That Uncertain Feeling

33. H.M. Pulham, Esq.

34. They Died with Their Boots On

35. Ringside Maisie

36. Sullivan's Travels

37. The Gay Falcon

38. Keep 'Em Flying

39. The Flame of New Orleans

40. Hold That Ghost

41. Charlie Chan in Rio

42. Shadow of the Thin Man

43. The Bride Came C.O.D.

44. Sundown

45. Hold Back the Dawn

46. Penny Serenade

47. When Ladies Meet

48. That Hamilton Woman

49. The Little Foxes

50. A Woman's Face

51. The Big Store

52. Spooks Run Wild

53. The Lady from Cheyenne

54. Blossoms in the Dust

55. Maisie Was a Lady

56. Confirm or Deny

57. Belle Starr

58. Adam Had Four Sons

59. Buck Privates

60. Love Crazy

61. Road to Zanzibar

62. Dead Men Tell

63. Invisible Ghost

64. In the Navy

65. Blood and Sand

66. Tobacco Road

67. Sergeant York

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Is it Frank or Scott?

 

MAN HUNT was very good. I still haven't seen I WAKE UP SCREAMING. BLUES IN THE NIGHT and RAGE IN HEAVEN I haven't seen, either.

 

The whole "best/favorite" thing I probably shouldn't have brought up. In the past, I've talked to film buffs that would outright dismiss my opinions after proclaiming my love for some less traditional films, or not fawning over some highly praised critical darling. The posters on here seem to understand and appreciate differing tastes a bit more, at least so far. I've received some flack for talking about newer films, but that's about it. Condescension towards someone due to their personal preference in art, or whatever, is never a good thing, in my opinion, and I'm sure yours as well.

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I have to add MAN HUNT to my list for '41. And BEDTIME STORY which is a favorite of mine.

 

Also, I forgot to mention THE LITTLE FOXES when discussing 1940.

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Some of my favorite Hollywood movies of: 1941:

 

The Bride Came C.O.D.
Cottage to Let
The Ghost Train
Here Comes Mr. Jordan
The Lady Eve
Love Crazy
Mr. & Mrs. Smith
My Life With Caroline
Topper Returns
 
I do not place them in order of favoritism because any might be my favorite of them all at any moment depending on my mood and how recently I have watched others.
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Some of my favorite Hollywood movies of: 1941:

 

The Bride Came C.O.D.
Cottage to Let
The Ghost Train
Here Comes Mr. Jordan
The Lady Eve
Love Crazy
Mr. & Mrs. Smith
My Life With Caroline
Topper Returns
 
I do not place them in order of favoritism because any might be my favorite of them all at any moment depending on my mood and how recently I have watched others.

 

 

I'll look forward to seeing The Ghost Train and My Life With Caroline for the first time.  I have recorded copies courtesy of TCM.  I see Kathleen Harrison is in Ghost Train.  I'll be watching her tonight when she plays Mrs. Dilber in Scooge (1951).

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Lawrence, 

 

Are we posting 1942 tomorrow? I'm anxious to see if CASABLANCA will be on everyone's list. :)

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More likely the day after, since a lot of people will be busy with Christmas. If you want to post tomorrow, that's fine with me. I could probably post late tomorrow evening. Everyone else can trickle in during the weekend, or whenever they have the time.

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More likely the day after, since a lot of people will be busy with Christmas. If you want to post tomorrow, that's fine with me. I could probably post late tomorrow evening. Everyone else can trickle in during the weekend, or whenever they have the time.

Okay, that sounds fair! :)

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Gertrude Stein was a voracious reader and was afraid that she would have read all the books, and there would be nothing left to read.  I used to feel that way about films. Seeing all these lists -- particularly Frank's -- makes me realize that there will always be more movies to see, many of which I never "dreamt of in my philosophy!"

 

Merry Christmas -- Happy Holidays -- Happy New Year. 

 

 

 

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Since it will be a couple of days before we move on, I decided, in my boredom, to check through the "1001 Movies to See Before You Die" book to see what titles were listed that failed to appear in any of our top ten lists. I'll list them by year, so you can see if there's any you've missed seeing, or if they just weren't your cup of tea. Titles with a * are ones that I've seen.

 

1930:

none

 

1931:

LIMITE

TABU*

 

1932:

none

 

1933:

THE BITTER TEA OF GENERAL YEN*

SONS OF THE DESERT*

 

1934:

THE GODDESS

 

1935:

none

 

1936:

THE STORY OF A CHEAT

 

1937:

MIDNIGHT SONG*

 

1938:

THE BAKER'S WIFE

OLYMPIA*

 

1939:

BABES IN ARMS*

THE STORY OF THE LATE CHRYSANTHEMUMS*

 

1940:

DANCE, GIRL, DANCE*

 

1941:

none

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Since it will be a couple of days before we move on, I decided, in my boredom, to check through the "1001 Movies to See Before You Die" book to see what titles were listed that failed to appear in any of our top ten lists. I'll list them by year, so you can see if there's any you've missed seeing, or if they just weren't your cup of tea. Titles with a * are ones that I've seen.

 

1930:

none

 

1931:

LIMITE

TABU*

 

1932:

none

 

1933:

THE BITTER TEA OF GENERAL YEN*

SONS OF THE DESERT*

 

1934:

THE GODDESS

 

1935:

none

 

1936:

THE STORY OF A CHEAT

 

1937:

MIDNIGHT SONG*

 

1938:

THE BAKER'S WIFE

OLYMPIA*

 

1939:

BABES IN ARMS*

THE STORY OF THE LATE CHRYSANTHEMUMS*

 

1940:

DANCE, GIRL, DANCE*

 

1941:

none

 

There are a number of these that I haven't seen: Limite, Midnight Song aka Song at Midnight.

I think TCM played The Goddess (1934) but I missed it.

The Story of the Last Chrysanthemums, Dance Girl Dance and The Story of a Cheat I also have not seen but have copies.

Of those that I have seen they are all on my extended runner up list with the exception of Babes In Arms.

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Since it will be a couple of days before we move on, I decided, in my boredom, to check through the "1001 Movies to See Before You Die" book to see what titles were listed that failed to appear in any of our top ten lists. I'll list them by year, so you can see if there's any you've missed seeing, or if they just weren't your cup of tea. Titles with a * are ones that I've seen.

 

1930:

none

 

1931:

LIMITE

TABU*

 

1932:

none

 

1933:

THE BITTER TEA OF GENERAL YEN*

SONS OF THE DESERT*

 

1934:

THE GODDESS

 

1935:

none

 

1936:

THE STORY OF A CHEAT

 

1937:

MIDNIGHT SONG*

 

1938:

THE BAKER'S WIFE

OLYMPIA*

 

1939:

BABES IN ARMS*

THE STORY OF THE LATE CHRYSANTHEMUMS*

 

1940:

DANCE, GIRL, DANCE*

 

1941:

none

Thanks for mentioning those, Lawrence. I don't think BABES IN ARMS is exactly a film people need to see before they die. Overall, we did pretty well with our lists. I hope you do this again when we finish covering the 40s. 

 

By the way, I am going to post my selections for '42 this afternoon.

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Screen%2Bshot%2B2015-12-23%2Bat%2B10.21.

 

My list:

1. MRS. MINIVER* (literary adaptation)

2. CASABLANCA (romance drama)
3. RANDOM HARVEST (literary adaptation)
4. NOW, VOYAGER (romance drama)

5. TO BE OR NOT TO BE (screwball comedy)
6. THE PRIDE OF THE YANKEES (biographical sports drama)
7. THE PALM BEACH STORY (screwball comedy)
8. THE GLASS KEY (crime drama)

9. THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS (literary adaptation)
10. REAP THE WILD WIND (adventure drama) and WENT THE DAY WELL? (British war film)

 

Honorable Mentions:
BAMBI (animated literary adaptation)
THE BIG STREET (crime drama)

GENTLEMAN JIM (biographical sports drama) 

THE GREAT MAN'S LADY (romantic western)

I MARRIED A WITCH (fantasy comedy)
THE MOON AND SIXPENCE (literary adaptation)

SABOTEUR (spy thriller)

STAR SPANGLED RHYTHM (morale booster)

TALES OF MANHATTAN (anthology)

THE TALK OF THE TOWN (romantic comedy drama)
THIS GUN FOR HIRE (noir)
THUNDER ROCK (British ghost film)

 

Notable Performers: Greer Garson; Ronald Colman; Bette Davis; Teresa Wright; Gary Cooper; and Errol Flynn. 

 

*On my Top-20 classics of all time.

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Top, excellent list. It's very similar to mine. I haven't seen THE GREAT MAN'S LADY, THE MOON AND SIXPENCE, or THUNDER ROCK. That last one intrigues me the most, being a ghost story.

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Before I post my 1942 list, let me make a quick addendum to last night's "1001" post. I left out two short films from the book, since we've just been listing features, but I figure I'll go ahead and list them now, just for the sake of thoroughness.

 

 

ZERO FOR CONDUCT* (1933)

LAND WITHOUT BREAD (1933)

 

 

Also, Merry Christmas!

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1942 - 79 films seen

 

 

1. CASABLANCA

2. MRS. MINIVER

3. THE PRIDE OF THE YANKEES

4. THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS

5. WENT THE DAY WELL?

6. TO BE OR NOT TO BE

7. SABOTEUR

8. WOMAN OF THE YEAR

9. YANKEE DOODLE DANDY

10. NOW, VOYAGER

 

Runner-ups: THE BLACK SWAN, IN WHICH WE SERVE, TALK OF THE TOWN, LARCENY INC., and RANDOM HARVEST.

 

 

CASABLANCA is my favorite classic film of all time. I could watch it a thousand times. It was also the first classic blu ray I ever purchased. I can't think of anything to say about it that hasn't been said before, other than that I love every minute of it.

 

A lot of people dismiss much of MRS. MINIVER as wartime propaganda mixed with sentimental string-pulling, and for the most part they're right. But I don't care, I love it. I also think it was a very important film of its time, helping to bring the struggle in Britain into the hearts of America.

 

WENT THE DAY WELL? is a film that validates my methodology in searching out films. If it wasn't for the "101 Best War Films" book, I most likely wouldn't have bothered to see it. I'm glad I did, and it's one of the most recent first-viewing films on any of my top ten lists.

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Top, excellent list. It's very similar to mine. I haven't seen THE GREAT MAN'S LADY, THE MOON AND SIXPENCE, or THUNDER ROCK. That last one intrigues me the most, being a ghost story.

Thanks. THUNDER ROCK is very good and turns up on TCM occasionally.

 

I wanted to rank THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS higher, but the studio's revised happy ending (after test audiences panned the picture) just seems too phony. Welles was screwed by RKO taking the film out of his hands.

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1942 - 79 films seen

 

 

1. CASABLANCA

2. MRS. MINIVER

3. THE PRIDE OF THE YANKEES

4. THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS

5. WENT THE DAY WELL?

6. TO BE OR NOT TO BE

7. SABOTEUR

8. WOMAN OF THE YEAR

9. YANKEE DOODLE DANDY

10. NOW, VOYAGER

 

Runner-ups: THE BLACK SWAN, IN WHICH WE SERVE, TALK OF THE TOWN, LARCENY INC., and RANDOM HARVEST.

 

 

CASABLANCA is my favorite classic film of all time. I could watch it a thousand times. It was also the first classic blu ray I ever purchased. I can't think of anything to say about it that hasn't been said before, other than that I love every minute of it.

 

A lot of people dismiss much of MRS. MINIVER as wartime propaganda mixed with sentimental string-pulling, and for the most part they're right. But I don't care, I love it. I also think it was a very important film of its time, helping to bring the struggle in Britain into the hearts of America.

 

WENT THE DAY WELL? is a film that validates my methodology in searching out films. If it wasn't for the "101 Best War Films" book, I most likely wouldn't have bothered to see it. I'm glad I did, and it's one of the most recent first-viewing films on any of my top ten lists.

I had read positive reviews for WENT THE DAY WELL? and for a long time wanted to see it. When TCM had its 20th anniversary in April 2014, they had 20 fan programmers on to introduce 20 classic films. One of our message board posters, a guy who goes by the name YanceyCravat, selected WENT THE DAY WELL? and we were all excited about that. It's a great, great motion picture. I think TCM has aired it once more since then.

 

Glad you mentioned THE BLACK SWAN and LARCENY INC. Both are very entertaining. 

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I had read positive reviews for WENT THE DAY WELL? and for a long time wanted to see it. When TCM had its 20th anniversary in April 2014, they had 20 fan programmers on to introduce 20 classic films. One of our message board posters, a guy who goes by the name YanceyCravat, selected WENT THE DAY WELL? and we were all excited about that. It's a great, great motion picture. I think TCM has aired it once more since then.

 

Glad you mentioned THE BLACK SWAN and LARCENY INC. Both are very entertaining.

 

 

My first viewing of WENT THE DAY WELL? was a TCM showing with a guest programmer. I think it may have been Patton Oswalt.

 

I checked the "1001 Movies..." book, and we've already named all but one of their 1942 entries. I thought you'd be amused to hear that MRS. MINIVER wasn't on the list until they received a lot of reader complaints, so they added it to a later edition.

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