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LawrenceA
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For some reason, here are the 1001 Movies to See Before You Die entries for 1945:

 

THE BATTLE OF SAN PIETRO

BRIEF ENCOUNTER

CHILDREN OF PARADISE

DETOUR

I KNOW WHERE I'M GOING

THE LOST WEEKEND

MILDRED PIERCE

ROME, OPEN CITY

SPELLBOUND

 

For anyone who doesn't know, THE BATTLE OF SAN PIETRO is a documentary short, from John Huston and Frank Capra, made for the US Army for propaganda purposes.

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For some reason, here are the 1001 Movies to See Before You Die entries for 1945:

 

THE BATTLE OF SAN PIETRO

BRIEF ENCOUNTER

CHILDREN OF PARADISE

DETOUR

I KNOW WHERE I'M GOING

THE LOST WEEKEND

MILDRED PIERCE

ROME, OPEN CITY

SPELLBOUND

 

For anyone who doesn't know, THE BATTLE OF SAN PIETRO is a documentary short, from John Huston and Frank Capra, made for the US Army for propaganda purposes.

I read somewhere that the bosses at Paramount loved I KNOW WHERE I'M GOING. And anytime their writers got stuck and needed inspiration, they had the writers re-watch I KNOW WHERE I'M GOING. It is supposedly one of the best written screen stories of the era. 

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Film lover,

 

I am just about finished with FALLEN ANGEL. I agree, the extra 23 minutes that were tacked back on, make this a superior film. It not only fills in the plot holes of the 98 minute version, but it allows us to go deeper with the characters and see how Faye's love redeems Andrews' character. 

 

If I remember correctly, Faye was upset that a song she recorded for the film was cut. And I think it was supposed to go over the opening credits. So that might explain why this 121 minute version starts without the credits. This may have very well been the original version that Preminger intended before Zanuck and the production code office got their hands on it.

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For 1945 - 75 films seen

 

1.  Les Enfants du Paradis

2.  A Tree Grows In Brooklyn

3.  Rome, Open City

4.  Brief Encounter

5.  They Were Expendable

6.  The Lost Weekend

7.  Road to Utopia

8.  Anchors Aweigh

9.  Mildred Pierce

10. Scarlet Street

 

Here are just some from my runner up list: "i Know Where I'm Going!", Dead of Night, To Have and Have Not, Hangover Square  and Spellbound.

 

Bogie's curio: Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne. 

 

I have yet to see The White Gorilla from your list, Lawrence.  

 

My current choices for performances for 1945 are:

 

Best Actor

 

Pierre Brasseur, Les Enfants du Paradis

 

Best Actress

 

Celia Johnson, Brief Encounter

 

Best Supporting Actor

 

James Dunn, A Tree Grows In Brooklyn

 

Best Supporting Actress

 

Margaret Rutherford, Blithe Spirit

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TopBilled--Am very glad you thought "Fallen Angel" so improved.  Am delighted I may actually have found Preminger's original cut of the film. I thought the 121 minute version was markedly better..  After seeing Faye, am convinced the lady had acting ability that went unused--except when she sang.

 

P.S.--LawrenceA--I've managed to miss both films.  Two more on a Long list to see.

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TopBilled--Am very glad you thought "Fallen Angel" so improved.  Am delighted I may actually have found Preminger's original cut of the film. I thought the 121 minute version was markedly better..  After seeing Faye, am convinced the lady had acting ability that went unused--except when she sang.

 

Totally agree. The part where she railed at Bickford in the police station was great. And there was a scene where she broke down in Andrews' arms that hit all the right notes. What a shame this was her only serious dramatic role. 

 

I read that she grew up in Hell's Kitchen and only had an 8th grade education. But she had natural intelligence and a talent that is seldom found in today's actresses. 

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Totally agree. The part where she railed at Bickford in the police station was great. And there was a scene where she broke down in Andrews' arms that hit all the right notes. What a shame this was her only serious dramatic role. 

 

I read that she grew up in Hell's Kitchen and only had an 8th grade education. But she had natural intelligence and a talent that is seldom found in today's actresses. 

I loved reading about Alice Faye sitting on the fire escape in the pre-air conditioning days of her youth. She was always a graceful presence in her films (I think I forgot to list In Old Chicago in my 1937 list).

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Minor Spoiler

 

There is a scene where she reads poetry of some sort to Andrews, to get him to sleep, about three verses or so.  And Faye gets the inflection, the intonation of every word exactly right.  It's awe inspiring how good she was.  In comedy also; she's gently sarcastic to a soldier going overseas the next day in "The Gang's All Here" (1943).  She was smart, & a better actress than she's given credit for.

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On my 1944 list, I mentioned ROSIE THE RIVETER-- the feminist musical Republic produced starring one of my favorite singing stars, Jane Frazee. 

Screen%2Bshot%2B2015-12-29%2Bat%2B6.10.2

A short time after making that post, I checked the Paramount Vault page on YouTube for new uploads. Paramount controls the Republic library. And to my great pleasure, ROSIE had just been uploaded. They have done a perfect job with the restoration.

 

The script is well written-- a hilarious romantic comedy set-up with Jane and her girlfriend Vera Vague sharing a room in a boarding house with two single men. The way the writers get around the production code is quite clever!

 

The gals of course wind up battling and falling in love with the guys. Vera's deadpan deliveries are wonderful; there's a lot of witty dialogue from beginning to end; a marvelous supporting cast that includes Maude Eburne and Carl (Alfalfa) Switzer as a teenager. Plus, there's a great scene where the gals have no clothes on and are locked out of the boarding house in the rain and get picked up by police (you have to see it!)..and a rousing finale filmed at an aviation factory. So much to make it enjoyable.

Screen%2Bshot%2B2015-12-29%2Bat%2B6.08.5

What I loved most was the slang they used at the time. I had never heard the word schmoodle used before. And they also said 'making woo' which I assume meant 'making love.'

 

Check it out and let me know what you think!

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1945

 

1. Scarlet Street

2. The Body Snatcher

3. Fallen Angel

4. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

5. Spellbound

6. Leave Her to Heaven

7. I Know Where I'm Going!

8. Detour

9. Hangover Square

10. The Spiral Staircase

11. Cornered

12. The Great Flamarion

13. And Then There Were None

14. The Power of the Whistler

15. The House of Fear

16. Our Vines Have Tender Grapes

17. Love Letters

18. Without Love

19. They Were Expendable

20. Along Came Jones

21. The Enchanted Cottage

22. Conflict

23. The Picture of Dorian Gray

24. The Thin Man Goes Home

25. Isle of the Dead

26. Blithe Spirit

27. San Antonio

28. The House on 92nd Street

29. The Strange Affair of Uncle Harry

30. Mildred Pierce

31. The Story of G.I. Joe

32. Brief Encounter

33. The Lost Weekend

34. Dakota

35. Lady on a Train

36. Danger Signal

37. Dillinger

38. House of Dracula

39. The Woman in Green

40. Adventure

41. The Southerner

42. The Naughty Nineties

43. Saratoga Trunk

44. The Valley of Decision

45. Vacation from Marriage

46. Flame of Barbary Coast

47. My Name Is Julia Ross

48. Pursuit to Algiers

49. Nob Hill

50. Blood on the Sun

51. Dead of Night

52. Strange Illusion

53. Back to Bataan

54. Voice of the Whistler

55. Week-End at the Waldorf

56. Christmas in Connecticut

57. Caesar and Cleopatra

58. Tonight and Every Night

59. Bewitched

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1946 - 63 films seen

 

 

1. THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES

2. NOTORIOUS

3. THE BIG SLEEP

4. IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE

5. PAISAN

6. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

7. MY DARLING CLEMENTINE

8. STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN

9. THE KILLERS

10. THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE

 

Runner-ups: NO REGRETS FOR OUR YOUTH, GILDA, THE BEAST WITH FIVE FINGERS, THE RAZOR'S EDGE, and GREAT EXPECTATIONS.

 

 

4 more noir. BEST YEARS was recently mentioned in an article I read as being one of the worst best picture winners ever. I obviously don't agree, and I'm still genuinely baffled how a film writer could say that. NO REGRETS is the first appearance on my lists of my third favorite director of all time, Akira Kurosawa. It also stars the wonderful Setsuko Hara, a beautiful, talented actress we lost this year. Speaking of beautiful women, they don't get much more alluring than Ava Gardner in THE KILLERS, Lana Turner in POSTMAN, Linda Darnell in CLEMENTINE, and Rita Hayworth in GILDA. And NOTORIOUS is my second most favorite Hitchcock.

 

 

Larry's Choice: THE DEVIL MONSTER

 

The plot doesn't really matter here (it's some nonsense about fishermen being targeted by an angry manta ray!), and it features no performers of note. This amazing failure was initially filmed in 1936. A Spanish language version was filmed concurrently, as was the practice then, and was released that year. The English version was retitled THE SEA FIEND and released in Great Britain in 1938. It wasn't released in the US until 1946, and only after it had been re-edited and nature footage was added, along with some tribal nudity shots. This dusty old Frankenstein patch job was then foisted on an unsuspecting public. I can't imagine what it was like to pay for your ticket and sit down in the theater and then this turkey shows up to gobble the screen. Priceless!

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1946

 

1. Gilda

2. The Killers

3. The Harvey Girls

4. The Dark Corner

5. Never Say Goodbye

6. Tomorrow is Forever

7. The Big Sleep

8. Deception

9. The Stranger

10. Notorious

 

I had a bunch of films for this year.  I had to leave off a few of my favorites to narrow it down to ten.  The Blue Dahlia, My Reputation and The Postman Always Rings Twice, I had to leave off. 

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For 1946 - 72 films seen

 

1.  Shoeshine

2.  Great Expectations

3.  The Best Years of Our Lives

4.  It's a Wonderful Life

5.  I See a Dark Stranger

6.  A Matter of Life and Death

7.  The Stranger

8.  Notorious

9.  The Yearling

10. The Big Sleep

 

Here are just some from my runner up list: Let There Be Light, My Darling Clementine, Green For Danger and Beauty and the Beast.

 

Bogie's curios: Song of the South and The Overlanders. 

 

My current choices for performances for 1946 are:

 

Best Actor

 

James Stewart, It's a Wonderful Life

 

Best Actress

 

Deborah Kerr, I See a Dark Stranger

 

Best Supporting Actor

 

Harold Russell, The Best Years of Our Lives

 

Best Supporting Actress

 

Anne Baxter, The Razor's Edge

 

Juvenile

 

Rinaldo Smordini, Shoeshine

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***

Screen%2Bshot%2B2015-12-30%2Bat%2B6.52.5

It was an eventful year: Dana Andrews suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder; Cecil Kellaway was clubbed with a bottle by John Garfield; Tyrone Power went off to find himself in the Himalayas; and Orson Welles terrorised Loretta Young in a sleepy New England town.

Screen%2Bshot%2B2015-12-29%2Bat%2B4.25.1

My list:

1. THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES* (post-war drama)
2. THE POSTMAN ALWAYS RINGS TWICE (noir)

3. GREAT EXPECTATIONS (British literary adaptation)
4. NOTORIOUS
 (suspense thriller)
5. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (French romantic fantasy)
6. HUMORESQUE (romance drama)
7. THE RAZOR'S EDGE (literary adaptation)
8. IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE (fantasy drama)
9. THE JOLSON STORY (biographical musical)
10. THE KILLERS (noir) and THE BLUE DAHLIA (noir)

Honorable Mentions:

CANYON PASSAGE (noir western)
CENTENNIAL SUMMER (musical)

CLUNY BROWN (literary adaptation)
GILDA (noir)

GREEN FOR DANGER (British thriller)
THE GREEN YEARS (literary adaptation)
THE HARVEY GIRLS (musical western)
I’VE ALWAYS LOVED YOU (musical drama)

I SEE A DARK STRANGER (British spy drama)
A MATTER OF LIFE AND DEATH (British romance fantasy)
O.S.S. (spy thriller)
PAISA' (Italian neorealist war film)
SISTER KENNY (biographical drama)
SMOKY (equestrian drama)
SOMEWHERE IN THE NIGHT (psychological thriller)
SONG OF THE SOUTH (literary adaptation)
SPECTER OF THE ROSE (art film—ballet musical-noir)
THE SPIRAL STAIRCASE (noir)
THE STRANGE LOVE OF MARTHA IVERS (noir)

THE STRANGER (noir)
TO EACH HIS OWN (melodrama)
TOMORROW IS FOREVER (melodrama)
TWO SISTERS FROM BOSTON (musical comedy)
THE YEARLING (literary adaptation)

 

Notable Performers: John Garfield; Harold Russell; James Baskett; Larry Parks; Rita Hayworth; James Stewart; and of course, Smoky.

 

*On my Top-20 classics of all time.

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1946 Favorites

 

Beauty and the Beast (La Belle et la Bete)

 

The Best Years of Our Lives

 

Gilda
 
The Green Years
 
It's a Wonderful Life
 
Make Mine Music
Particularly for the "Johnnie Fedora and Alice Bluebonnet" segment.
 
My Darling Clementine
 
The Razor’s Edge
 
Sister Kenny
 
The Spiral Staircase
 
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1946 Favorites

 

Beauty and the Beast (La Belle et la Bete)

 

The Best Years of Our Lives

 

Gilda
 
The Green Years
 
It's a Wonderful Life
 
Make Mine Music
Particularly for the "Johnnie Fedora and Alice Bluebonnet" segment.
 
My Darling Clementine
 
The Razor’s Edge
 
Sister Kenny
 
The Spiral Staircase

 

Glad you mentioned SISTER KENNY. Robert Osborne made a comment in a wraparound earlier this year that Roz did not succeed in dramas, but I think SISTER KENNY and a noir called THE VELVET TOUCH prove that she did. And she works best with British or Canadian costars-- Cary Grant, Brian Aherne, Alexander Knox, Walter Pidgeon and Leo Genn. 

 

THE GREEN YEARS is one of my honorable mentions for two reasons-- I love Cronin's poignant story, and Charles Coburn is a force of nature in this picture. He should have had another Oscar. 

 

I don't care for MY DARLING CLEMENTINE. I prefer other versions of the oft-filmed story-- FRONTIER MARSHAL and GUNFIGHT AT THE O.K. CORRAL. I think Ford makes critical mistakes with this picture. There are moments of brilliance (the comic relief with Alan Mowbray is handled particularly well), but Ford's behind-the-scenes problems with Walter Brennan led to some of Brennan's stuff being cut, and you cannot have a film of this type where the main villain is missing for two-thirds of the narrative. And Zanuck, who was probably sleeping with Darnell, pushes Ford to prominently feature her, when it's really a story about the two men and the vicious Clanton gang. So this film is not the masterpiece it should have been.

 

By the way, a few years prior to this Republic made a hayseed musical called O, MY DARLING CLEMENTINE which has a completely unrelated story, and in my opinion, is better-- especially for folks who appreciate early country music.

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Glad you mentioned SISTER KENNY as I unintentionally omitted it from my list. 

 

THE GREEN YEARS is one of my honorable mentions for two reasons-- I love Cronin's poignant story, and Charles Coburn is a force of nature in this picture. He should have had another Oscar. 

 

I don't care for MY DARLING CLEMENTINE. 

 

I think Sister Kenny is a fine film about an unsung hero, and Roz is excellent in it. Whenever the film showed on NYC television, one of the papers' listings would say, "We prefer Sister Mame."

 

I love The Green Years -- probably my favorite A.J. Cronin adaptation. Coburn is indeed amazing, though they got him up to look like the Cowardly Lion.

 

My Darling Clementine is pure Ford poetry, in my opinion. My favorite scene is when Clementine (Doc Holliday's girlfriend) arrives and Wyatt Earp shows her Doc Holliday's room. The music plays -- she looks at -- almost fondles -- all the objects in the room. That is almost a mirror image, in spirit, of the scene early in The Grapes of Wrath when Ma Joad is going through her smaller possessions, each evoking a memory, as "Red River Valley" plays in the background. John Ford's art is in those scenes (and in the rest of those and his other movies, of course). 

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I love The Green Years -- probably my favorite A.J. Cronin adaptation.

 

One thing I love about THE GREEN YEARS (I have not read the novel) is the way the screenwriters structure the narrative. Giving the first half to Dean Stockwell and the second half to Tom Drake just works so perfectly. And of course, Coburn is the main character who bridges both halves of the story. His death scene near the end, something we see coming a mile away, is hard to take. The actor who comes closest to accomplishing the same dramatic effect with a larger than life character, to me, is Simon Callow in FOUR WEDDINGS AND A FUNERAL.

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My Darling Clementine is pure Ford poetry, in my opinion. My favorite scene is when Clementine (Doc Holliday's girlfriend) arrives and Wyatt Earp shows her Doc Holliday's room. The music plays -- she looks at -- almost fondles -- all the objects in the room. That is almost a mirror image, in spirit, of the scene early in The Grapes of Wrath when Ma Joad is going through her smaller possessions, each evoking a memory, as "Red River Valley" plays in the background. John Ford's art is in those scenes (and in the rest of those and his other movies, of course).

Great comment, Swithin. You're right on it.

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