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Recording to DVD


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Hi all. I'm new here and I just have a quick question. Has anyone here been successfully recording movies off of TCM using the DVD recorder? By successfully, I mean do they play correctly in other DVD players besides the one they are recorded in?

 

I have a DVD recorder and I've been recording alot of movies recently. Some of them I've been watching while they record; others I've watched afterwards but usually in the DVD player in which they were recorded.

 

A few nights ago, I watched a copy of "The Philadelphia Story" in the DVD player in my bedroom. It is a cheap Polaroid DVD player, but the movie did not play correctly. Every minute or so it seemed to slow down. My father thinks this may be a result of macrovision, but I am not sure if that applies to TCM.

 

I haven't had a chance yet to test this particular DVD in the other DVD player in the house, but I plan on testing it and one of the movies that successfully played on the recorder in the other player to see if they work correctly.

 

Basically I was just wondering if anyone else has encountered this problem or if your movies work in all players once taping off TCM. I don't want to keep taping if TCM is really the problem and all dics will do this. Thanks in advance. =)

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Thanks so much. =) I thought it seemed strange that the disc wasn't working right. I've taped so many movies I haven't gotten to watch yet; I'd be heartsick if none of them worked. I guess I'll play around when I get home and see.

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This DVD stuff is a little complicated today.

 

There are several different DVD formats. I did a little research and I bought a recorder that uses several formats: DVD ?R, DVD R, DVD ? and RW, and DVD RAM.

 

After reading the 84 page instruction booklet, I started out using DVD +R disks. They require a ?finalizing? process before they can be played on any other DVD player. I just go to the main menu and click on ?finalize? after I finish recording the disks, and that takes about 3 minutes. My ?finalized? disks will play on all DVD machines, including computer DVD drives.

 

You might read the instructions of your recorder and your player and see if the disks you use are compatible.

 

If I record onto a DVD +R disk but do not ?finalize? the disk, it won?t play on other machines. I?ve never used the other formats, so I don?t know how they would react to being played on other machines.

 

I can record movies off of TCM either directly onto DVD or onto tape. I can copy the tape directly to my DVD machine.

 

You might want to try playing your disks on some friend?s machine to see what happens.

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My DVD recorder requires the finalization process as well, which I always perform. My DVD player is compatable with the mentioned formats, and I use DVD-Rs. Everything finalizes and seems to play, but it just so happened that the one disc played funny. I'm going to try a few of the discs in my other DVD player later tonight and see if they work. If not, there's obviously something wrong with either the discs or the recorder (which we've only had since Christmas).

 

Thanks for your help! =)

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Just2554,

 

I will leave the discussion of DVD recordables to FredCDobbs. I have not taken the leap to a DVD recorder at this time.

 

I will address your mention of Macrovision.

 

Quote:

"Every minute or so it seemed to slow down. My father thinks this may be a result of macrovision, but I am not sure if that applies to TCM."

 

I took the time to learn something about the subject a year ago.

 

I had bought two DVDs--"Seance On A Wet Afternoon" and Criterion's "The Devil And Daniel Webster". I wanted a VHS copy (please ignore the implications of the word "copy") for my mother of "Seance On A Wet Afternoon". I am such a thoughtful son. After recording "Seance On A Wet Afternoon" I thought, "I've got all these cables hooked up...might as well copy the Criterion disk".

 

The DVD to VHS for "Seance On A Wet Afternoon" was fine--not one glitch. The VHS copy of "The Devil And Daniel Webster" was not watchable and had the 'look' of Macrovision--flashing picture, loss of horizontal synchronization and problems with color. I looked at Criterion's DVD box for mention of "Macrovision"--nothing. A few DVD copy protect symbols but, not "Macrovision".

 

I am a tinkerer. I thought, "well that is not going to stop me...I will try a few other cable configurations and give the copy thing another shot". It did stop me. I never did get a watchable VHS copy of "The Devil And Daniel Webster".

 

I was interested enough in this copy protect deal that I did some research on the internet. I was surprised but, information about Macrovision was not easy to find.

 

This is what I glean is the deal with DVD copy protect schemes. DVD manufacturers have several ways to copy protect using digital means--all those symbols on DVD boxes represent the multiple digital copy protects. The digital copy protect works in the digital universe. The Macrovision (your dad mentioned) is an analog thing. A DVD to DVD copy would never enter the analog realm--Macrovision would never be 'accessed'. On the other hand, my DVD to VHS setup had cables connected from the analog output of the DVD player to the analog input of the VHS recorder. The signal remained in the analog world and accessed any existing analog copy protect.

 

I will summarize my thoughts about copy protect--digital and analog.

 

My DVD of "Seance On A Wet Afternoon" never had Macrovision applied to the movie. As a result, no problems making an analog copy.

 

My DVD of "The Devil And Daniel Webster" had Macrovision added at some point--probably not when the DVD version was manufactured. The DVD recording of this movie still encoded the legacy Macrovision. Because the manufacturer never added Macrovision to the DVD version, the DVD box had no Macrovision symbol.

 

The reason I had trouble finding information about Macrovision is because it is not a digital thing and...why would anyone want to make a VHS of a DVD??

 

I did find a couple of electronic units (even a schematic for a home built unit) for stripping Macrovision. Probably left over from pre-digital video days.

 

Hope that helps.

 

Rusty

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Hello,

 

A couple of other thoughts about the Macrovision thing.

 

I know...ancient history but, so am I.

 

Macrovision copy protect encoded in broadcast material is unlikely.

 

The following paragraph is not based on facts--it is my opinion.

 

At the time Macrovision was a big deal, I remember many complaints about screwed up television viewing of encoded VHS tapes. Even though Macrovision was designed to 'activate' when a copy protected tape was recorded and then played, complaints of "Macrovision effects" were noted from simply playing original copy protected tapes. To avoid broadcasts of copy protected material screwing with viewer's televisions, I bet broadcasters remove Macrovision before broadcast.

 

I may be wrong. Anyone "in the know" care to comment?

 

Rusty

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Thanks for your help everyone.

 

Well, when I got home last night, I tested a bunch of discs. I tried movies from TCM and also stuff my dad has been recording off of the Travel Channel. Aside from our DVD recorder (which is Panasonic and which I've been watching everything on -- it was stupid of me to wait so long to put one of these discs in a different DVD player), we have two other DVD players, both Panasonic. I let a bunch of discs play for 10-15 minutes and one DVD player acted up and the other one (the slightly older one) did not. Tonight my boyfriend is going to take a few discs home and see if they work correctly in his DVD player (which is also slightly older).

 

Does anyone have any suggestions or input on this? My dad is away, but when he gets home he's going to play around with the players and see what he can find. Is there maybe some kind of setting or something that needs to be changed? I really don't know much about this, but any input would be appreciated. =)

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Just,

 

Be sure that you are using the correct DVDs when recording. Check the manual to see if you should be using DVD+R or DVD-R. There is a difference between the two. If you are using incompatible DVDs while it looks like they are recording properly, they won't finalize properly.

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Just,

 

Your situation sounds familiar. Most of the discs I burn will work on my DVD player, but once in a while I'll get one (same media brand, same format, and same recording process as the others) that won't play smoothly (if at all) in the player, but will on the drive that burned them. (I don't have another player handy to test them on.) I could be wrong, but I'm guessing they're just bad discs.

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To quote "VideoHelp.com" DVD R- is compatible with approximately 93% of all DVD recorders and players, while DVD R+ is compatible with approximately 89%. My Pioneer DVD recorder will only record DVD R-. My Denon and my other Pioneer player will play both. The biggest single problem with incompatibility issues is the particular manufacturer of DVD media itself. I personally use Taiyo Yudens that are made in Japan. They are widely thought to be the best available, but are not always a good match with Panasonic players. They do, however, perform flawlessly with my recorder and players. I have done well over 300 recordings and have yet to make a single coaster. The idea is to try out a few of the quality brands and see what works best with your equipment. I would say that even one single failure would be enough for me to doubt that brand's compatibility with my equipment and would then move on to another brand. One thing that I hear over and over again is to stay away from "house brands" like Staples and others. Also a good rule of thumb is "Made in Japan" = Good, "Made in Taiwan/China" =Not so Good. Good luck.

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Thanks again everyone. The discs I'm using are DVD-Rs, but my recorder is compatable with DVD-R, DVD+R, & DVD-RW. I've tried two different brands and every single disc will not play correctly in one of the players, but plays flawlessly in the other (which does happen to be the higher quality one).

 

My dad seems to think that maybe it's just due to the fact that some of the players are older and may not be 100% compatable with the recorded discs. Someone in the thread stated the 93% & 89% compatability, so I guess that could be a reason why, especially given that the discs DO play in the highest quality player we have outside of the recorder.

 

If anyone has anymore ideas, I'm very open to them. For now, my next step is to let my boyfriend take a few disks and try them in his two house DVD players and his Playstation. I mean, for now it doesn't matter to me that the discs only play in two of our players. I'm just thinking toward the future really, as I'll be moving soon and don't want to cart around a bunch of discs that won't work. Then again, chances are once I'm settled, I'll be getting a brand new DVD player (which means it could be more compatable with recorded discs).

 

Thanks to everyone for trying to help me out with my frustration. =)

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Does your computer have a burner. I've used dvd-r DVDR and DVDRW the rw don't have to be finalized. There are websites that tell you which brands of media are compatable with different players . Why don't you make a copy of your discs using a computer and one of the DVD copying software since you made them yourself it shouldn't be write protected and try a different brand or RW which I find is more forgiving.But several websites that sell medias usally have compatability charts with different brands but it's always good to have a back-up copy but I've had problems with many discs myself that were defective but if the infomation is on the disc you should be able to copy it using a different format or brand .

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Mary,

 

Trying to burn another copy is an excellent idea since all the information is there. My boyfriend is going to test out some DVD's on all the machines in his house tomorrow. If none of those work, he has a laptop with a DVD burner and I know he has a different kind of blank disc than I've been using. I'll let him try to burn it if nothing works up until that point. Thanks for the suggestion. =)

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Glad this thread was started! Looks like I'm going to have to learn all this soon. I had a sad bit of news today...My Pioneer DVD/LD player never made it to the tech in California..He (HAL) was DOA! I guess something fell on him in transit for his yearly check up. They are going to "outside sources" to find the same machine. I'm hoping they find one. I have a few hundred laserdiscs movies that are not easy to find in any format, and have been putting off recording them to DVD. Some of them have great commentaries that were not put on the DVDs. He didn't even get to say goodbye to his fellow players in the house. Keep your fingers crossed for me please! Sniff...Sniff...

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I just want to add one piece of advice. After recording literally hundreds of DVD's off of satellite TV, and carefully labeling and cataloging the disks, I discovered playback issues which ranged from skipping to freezing images.

To make a long horror story short, it turned out it was the stick-on labels. I did a lot of research on another website and DVD's do not play well with labels. Over time and with applied heat, it just gets worse the more "stuck on" they are.

You never mentioned if you labeled, but a word to the wise, get a permanent marker and save yourself the time-consuming job of removing paper labels.

Good luck!

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scamperbritches,

 

You make an excellent point. Home made DVDs should only be labeled with a permanent marker. In addition to the aforementioned playability issues, the labels can also flake off and cause internal damage to your player itself. Another word to the wise is to make sure that you store your DVDs in some sort of case when not in use. They are a lot more volatile than CDs.

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Some more advice on blank DVD's - - avoid spindle packs (those are the blanks sold in a stack without cases). You may save a few pennies by buying those and then the cases separately, but it ain't worth it. Nine times out of ten, more than 1/3 of them are bad.

 

Also, watch out for drive speed (2X, 4X, etc.). Even though it says it's compatible, I've had very bad luck with 1-16X discs. Always try to find a disc that is closest to your drive - - ex: on a 4X drive, 1-4X will work better than 1-8X. Sony,Panasonic, TDK seem to work best for me. I've had bad luck with Maxell and Memorex.

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Hey Cap......you're right......the Sonys and TDK seem to work the best.

 

I've been buying Sonys on a spindle for the past 2 years and have never had any problems....I've bought over 1000 Sony DVD-R's and have only had 1 bad disc......not bad huh?

 

Another thing to remember about labeling DVD media is that you do NOT want to write on the DVD with a Sharpie marker.....there is a chemical in permanent markers that will alter the information after a time. I just write a number on the inside of the ring, very close to the whole where there is no info stored.

 

Touchy little beasts these are!

 

:>)

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constarkel and scamperbritches,

 

Sounds like a vaudeville act!

 

Anyway. Thanks for mentioning that thing about labels and disk media. I have made a lot of compact disks from LP's and reel-to-reel tapes. All have been labeled using a kit. All have been burned using a reliable burner (Magix). A lot of the compact disks have played okay at first but, as time goes on, songs (even the entire disk) will quit playing. Note that I play compact disks a lot in my vehicle, using a changer.

 

I was really scratching my head over the degradation of the disks. The disk surface looks okay and the plastic coating looks intact. I had no idea what was going on.

 

Labels, huh? No more labels but, my custom labels are so pretty!

 

How about disk shelf life issues?

 

I have heard cheap compact disks (having a thin plastic coating) might wear away after several years of use--exposing the aluminum disk and...corrosion of aluminum and...good-bye data.

 

Rusty

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I'm glad to see more people getting involved in this thread. =)

 

As to the new posts: I do not use labels, I always label my disks with a permanent marker, so that's definitely not the problem. I have had two packs of spindle disks (one was a Sony, the other was a different brand) and I'm still having problems playing in two out of three DVD players in my house other than the recorder.

 

Tonight my boyfriend is going to test a few DVDs in the two DVD players in his house along with testing them in his Playstation and his DVD drive in his laptop. If none of these work, he is going to burn a copy of one movie (he has a few DVD-R's that were bought in cases as a five-pack) and see if that works.

 

Thanks for all the help and keep the discussion going everyone. I think it's good conversing about new technology and trying to help others work out the kinks in their systems.

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I just got a dvd player/recorder for Christmas...so, I SHOULDN'T use a Sharpie to write the name of the movie on the disc?! Wow, that really is annoying. How else am I supposed to label the discs if I also shouldn't put a paper label on? Is is just the Sharpie brand in particular or ALL permanent markers?

 

I've tried 3 different brands of discs so far--Sony, Memorex and Fuji. The Fuji discs definitely have the best picture quality for me. Even in the LP or EP mode.

 

Sandy K

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Sandy,

 

I've always labeled my disks with a permanent marker. The statement on this thread that they can cause problems eventually is something new to me that I'm definitely going to have to look into. My dad works in a CD/DVD manufacturing plant and he has always told me to write on the discs with a permanent marker, so I've never even thought otherwise.

 

Who knows though -- seems to me the disks and the dvd recorder technology are still awful fragile and it's just going to take some time to get everything worked out.

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"You may save a few pennies by buying those and then the cases separately, but it ain't worth it. Nine times out of ten, more than 1/3 of them are bad. "

 

What brand are you getting? I buy sony dvd-r's by 50 or 100, and I am lucky to get one bad disc!

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