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Recording to DVD


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Glad for the info on which discs are the best!

This new computer has the Media Center on it and something called Light Scribe. I guess it makes a label right onto the disc (by magic I guess). Haven't had time to try it yet. Anyone familiar with this? Thanks!

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OMG - am I ever glad I read this thread. I have spent so much time, money and energy making my DVD collection. The first DVD recorder I got, Nov 2004, turned out to be a dud and went back to the dealer - and I got a new one that I like. One issue it had was that if I recorded something on LP, for instance, and didn't finalize the disk, when I went back to record something else, the disk would always screw up. I've spent a long time re-recording movies that I thought I already had - but didn't because of the darn DVDR. :-( I assumed that it was all the fault of the bad DVDR, but now I wonder if some of it was the labelling. I had NO idea that labels caused problems. And my collection looks SO beautiful. boo hoo hoo I've gone to different sites and got computer photos of the movie posters for the movies, sized them, and put them on computer labels, most of them look as nice as the real DVDs. So this really makes me sad. Why, oh why do companies make things that are not good for a product? Yes...........I know, the almighty $$$.

 

 

These problems that you discussed here, freezing and skipping are 2 of my problems. There is another one, that I call "pixellating", I don't know what the pros call it, but that's my name for it. It's like "pixellated" in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town so I like the name. LOL. In computer lingo, all the tiny squares that go together to make a picture, are called pixels, so that's where I came up with the name. So, what it means is when you get little squares of the movie, kind of breaking up. Has anyone had this happen? It sometimes also happens during bad weather.

 

 

Is there any way of removing the labels? Oh, sigh, what a job - but better than losing my movies! Right now, my re-recorded ones just have masking tape on them, with the name because I haven't had time to relabel them, obviously a blessing. Is there any special felt pens that one should/shouldn't use? To 'just', please find out from your dad if it matters. I sure don't want to use something that will also damage the DVD, like one person mentioned. Thanks. And thanks to everyone for all the information.

 

 

I don't think I've had problems with the actual disks in spindels, of course I can't be sure, but the movies I have without labels but bought on spindels seem to work ok. I buy Memorex or Sony but prefer the Memorex.

 

 

Scarlett

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Scarlett,

 

I wouldn't recommend the masking tape you are using on your disks till you can label them.

 

The adhesive backing of masking tape can be detrimental to the disc. You are better off using a yellow sticky than masking tape.

 

I don't think there is a way to take the old labels off without creating a big mess. They never peel off completely with just one tug. It would likely leave little pieces of glue and label behind.

 

If you want to make labels that will last and don't mind spending the extra $$, Verbatim makes a DVD+R and DVD-R that comes with a white printable label already attached. But you have to have a printer that will print straight on the disc.

 

Your best bet for now is to label with a black sharpie and save the beautiful artwork for the cases.

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These problems that you discussed here, freezing and skipping are 2 of my problems. There is another one, that I call "pixellating", I don't know what the pros call it, but that's my name for it. It's like "pixellated" in Mr. Deeds Goes to Town so I like the name. LOL. In computer lingo, all the tiny squares that go together to make a picture, are called pixels, so that's where I came up with the name. So, what it means is when you get little squares of the movie, kind of breaking up. Has anyone had this happen? It sometimes also happens during bad weather.

 

Scarlett,

 

This is the exact problem I've been having. Pixellating is a good name for it, because that's what it looks like. You can see all of the pixels. Anyways, thus far I've tested my discs in 5 DVD players, 2 DVD drives in computers, and a Playstation outside of my recorder. 3 DVD players play them correctly, two do not. 1 computer drive plays them correctly, 1 does not. The Playstation plays them correctly.

 

I'd like to say that there's some sort of pattern to the madness, but there isn't. All of our DVD players (including our recorder) are Panasonic and only 1 player outside of the recorder plays the recorded discs. My boyfriend has the Playstation and his house has 2 DVD players -- one a no-name and one a Sony. Both of his play them right. One of the computer drives is a laptop, one is a regular computer...the laptop one works, the other does not.

 

As for me, I'll be moving in with my boyfriend at the beginning of next semester, so I'm fine as long as his DVD player continues to play my discs. I must say though, it is very frustrating in general that the technology still has so many kinks in it.

 

And my dad says that labeling the discs with a permanent marker is fine. =)

 

Justine*

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Does anyone know how a DVD player turns the DVD disk?

 

If it has a roller that rolls along the top of a disk, then that roller could bump every time it hits a label tape or a warped paper label. But I'm not sure what actually turns the disks. It has to be some kind of roller somewhere, but I'm not sure where the force is put on the disk.

 

I've had no trouble using a magic marker on the top of my disks. In fact the Verbatim disks I use have three engraved lines at the bottom of the top of the disk which look like they are for a pen to write titles on.

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FredCDobbs,

 

No roller.

 

Let me see...it has been awhile since I opened a player up.

 

An arm with a spindle contacts the disk center, lifts the disk off the drawer. A pivoted arm with a rotating cup contacts the center of the disk from above and holds the disk in place. The spindle begins spinning the disk.

 

The laser is located on the spindle arm and slides from the edge of disk to the center of the disk (~1/2 to 3/4 inch off center of disk). The 'park' position for the laser is at the edge of the disk.

 

When the disk is 'up to speed', the laser slides from the park position to the directory sectors. The directory sectors are located 1/2 to 3/4 inch off center. Once the directory is read the front panel display activates.

 

Playing the disk, the laser moves along a linear track from inside disk to edge of disk.

 

BTW: If you want to have some fun(?), insert a disk into your player, power it down, take the cover off the top, locate the switch (usually) somewhere around the edge of the case, insert something to hold the 'case open' switch closed, power back up and see the disk mechanism do its thing.

 

On the other hand, if you value your warranty, you probably should not open the player.

 

Rusty

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Thanks very much, Rusty. So it plays sort of like an old 45 rpm record, but the cup holds the disk tight to the spindle, and the laser plays from inside to the outside. Very interesting.

 

I ain't gonna open mine up or fool around with it. Not until it stops working altogether.

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FredCDobbs,

 

Good idea about not opening it up.

 

I've had a disk fly out of the holder--I was 'adjusting' the cup pressure screw.

 

BTW: If you don't insert a disk and power it up, it is interesting to see the laser 'slam' from one end of the linear track to the other (as I remember, it does it two times). I think the microprocessor 'freaks' if it does not immediately read the directory...then decides no disk is present.

 

All right...so I'm starving for entertainment.

 

Rusty

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I've had my Panasonic recorder for about 8 months and I've had several Sony disks and one Verbatim disk stop in the middle of a recording. The whole recording system shuts down as if it is at the end of the recording time. I've wondered if this is because I need to tighten the pressure cup pressure (although I thought it was a roller that needed a little more pressure).

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> I've had my Panasonic recorder for about 8 months and

> I've had several Sony disks and one Verbatim disk

> stop in the middle of a recording. The whole

> recording system shuts down as if it is at the end of

> the recording time. I've wondered if this is because

> I need to tighten the pressure cup pressure (although

> I thought it was a roller that needed a little more

> pressure).

 

fred- which Panasonic you have? I just bought the RES30VS vhs/dvdr combo..so far no problems with recording vhs-dvd or off 'air'......

 

I was told in regard to the discs,to ONLY buy Sony and TDK made in JAPAN...not Taiwan....those Japanese discs are made by a company called Taiyo Yuden, when apparently is THE DVD R blank maker in the world....

 

 

avoid Imation and the like.....

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FredCDobbs,

 

Sorry about not getting back to you sooner. I was at work. I wrote that just before I was headed out the door. Did not turn on the computer at home.

 

Instead of computer stuff watched the TCM broadcast of "The Long Voyage Home", a recording of "Yellowjack" and "Right Cross". So, I am not really starved for entertainment besides, it is sleeting like crazy.

 

The "cup pressure" comment referenced an old (but expensive) Sony CD changer (it was worth fixing). As I remember, the changer mechanism was having problems and, while I had the player open, I decided to do a little experimentin'.

 

I discovered that there is an optimum adjustment for cup pressure. Too much and the spindle will not spin the disk up to required RPM and shuts down. Even in the most expensive equipment the motor is probably not designed for a lot of torque and does not have the 'oomph' to overcome much resistance. Too little and the disk spins but, also slides, between the spindle and the pressure cup. Again, the disk does not reach required revolutions and the player quits. The situation of too little pressure--you can hear the plastic disk scraping the spindle.

 

Way too little pressure and the aforementioned "flying disk" is the result.

 

BTW: Does a CD player relate to a DVD player? Yes.

Consider. The basic mechanics for a turntable have not changed since platter shape replaced cylindrical shape. The disk size and shape determine the mechanics of the player/ recorder.

 

I wonder if the Laserdisk has the same sort of mechanism? Larger disk than compact disk, a lot more stuff to rotate.

 

Rusty

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I appreciate the feed-back Rusty, TZ, Justine, et. al. When I got done posting here the other day, I couldn't sit still and wait..........I started reading internet message boards and a lot of technical stuff. I'd like to share with you what I found in 3-4 hours of research. It isn't pleaseant news. :-(

 

 

1) For various reasons, labels are not good to use. They can cause many problems, some immediate, some in time.

 

 

2) Techs do not advise using Sharpies or any other marking pens. Apparently, some companies, like Sharpie, have made a special line of CD/DVD pens that are safe to use. Anything esle can cause a lot of trouble, in time, for many different reasons. One of them includes the 'aluminum' in the disk, as someone mentioned.

 

 

3) The safest place to write on is the clear plastic space at the center of the DVD.

 

 

4) The very best thing to clean DVDs with is warm, soapy water. They recommend taking labels off that way. It does work very well.

 

 

Soooo - I have spent much time washing my DVDs. The labels have come off reasonably well. One thing, though, if you're planning on doing this is to change the water after every 1 or 2 disks. Otherwise the glue will float in the water and adhere to the bottom side of the DVDs.

 

 

I have taken the masking tape off my DVDs - I was going to do that anyway but certainly not as fast as I've done it. ^^ Then, after the DVDs are perfectly clean, I'm going to put them in my DVD wallets. Some of them will be filed by genre, some by actor, the year the movie came out, etc. For instance, I have a whole binder in which anything after 1960 is filed, this I call "New releases". LOL I am going to get a bunch of DVD Sharpies in various colors for various genres - then put the label on each little compartment each DVD gets put into. I will write the name and/or number on the clear, centre hold with a DVD Sharpie in the proper color. Then I will enter each name into a computer database. That is taking a lot of precautions - but my DVD collection is very important to me. I hope someone can benefit from the things I have learned about this topic.

 

 

I know there are some movies I will have to re-record, and there is no use getting upset about it, I'll just have to do it and make the best of it. This is really frustrating, but there is nothing else to be done. At least I found out about it while most of my DVDs haven't been labeled yet. So, I took all the masking tape off and am trying to get on with it. For those people that have to do the same, I wish you good luck and keep your chin up. :-)

 

 

Scarlett

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I've been storing my burned DVDs in wallets too, but I'm starting to become concerned about doing that. I'm still a little unclear on exactly why labels damage the discs, but if a paper label can make a disc unreadable, it seems like the pressure on the DVDs when they're stuffed next to each other in a case can't be any better for them.

 

And then there's this article: http://www.pcworld.com/news/article/0,aid,124312,00.asp

It's specifically about the lifespans of burned CDs, which are given as between 2 and 5 years (!). Everything I've read indicates that burned DVDs are even less stable than CDs are.

 

So now I'm wondering if I'm just wasting my time? I've easily burned 500-600 discs of TCM movies, old videotapes and data in the last year or so. If I'm going to have to copy everything every couple of years to keep it from degrading and becoming unreadable ... is it even worth the effort?

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Whether it's videotape, cds or dvds, all three mediums have a definite shelf life. These are not permanent ways to store fims you love.

 

Videotapes after ten years can become problematic with sound bleed through and degradation of image. Plus, running older tapes through your machine can clog the heads of the VCR. Plus, there will come a time in the next few years when they will stop making VCRS which will render VHS another relic on the battlefield of changing technology.

 

CDs and DVDs only have about a ten year shelf life and with the coming Hi-Def and Blu-Ray formats, a change in DVDs is coming. Blu-Ray and HD discs hold more information than the DVDs now made. Blu-Ray says its machine will play both older discs and the new Blu-Ray discs. But, like videotape, there will come a time when you will need to migrate your current DVDs to whatever new technology medium becomes available.

 

We would all like to think that the films we have taken the time to record and add to our libraries will still be able to be enjoyed as we grow older without our having to do anything more than take the videotapes or discs out and watch them.

 

The reality is, with changes in technology happening so quickly these days, nothing is a permanent medium.

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kaplan,

 

Quote:

"It's specifically about the lifespans of burned CDs, which are given as between 2 and 5 years (!). Everything I've read indicates that burned DVDs are even less stable than CDs are."

 

I am glad you brought up the 'shelf life' issue. I mentioned that thing somewhere earlier in this thread.

 

I will write a couple of brief points.

 

2 to 5 year CD life span is probably pessimistic--I have read 10 to 20 year DVD life span. I am splitting hairs. The important thing is--the selling of the compact disk format was, "digital data is forever"--not true?!

 

How long a DVD will last is not known--burned at home and purchased. Accelerated wear tests are models. The simulations may or, may not, reflect actual shelf life.

 

Actual shelf life is dependent on a bunch of variables--disk quality, burner quality, DVD burner algorithms (ability to handle errors), disk storage, etcetera.

 

One anecdote. A couple of months ago I unearthed a twenty year old, six VHS set of "I Claudius". Recorded in 1985, stored in a variety of environments, all six tapes played fine. Not a hitch.

 

I wonder if DVDs will survive 20 years--no one knows!

 

Bottom line, transferring VHS to DVD for archival purposes? My advice--keep the original tape after burning the DVD.

 

Rusty

 

BTW: Technology does improve, what may be unreadable today may play a few years from now (better software, you know). Hang on to those unplayable disks.

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lzcutter,

 

I read your message after I posted the thing I wrote.

 

lzcutter...all good points.

 

Now...where is the "lzcutter" thread I mentioned a couple of months ago?

 

This is just the sort of technical issue that needs a 'one-stop shop', uh..so to speak.

 

I know, it would be a lot of work.

 

I'll keep hoping!

 

Rusty

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I realize that there's no permanent solution. Part of the reason I got my DVD burner was to archive old videotapes (some 15+ years old) that I knew wouldn't be playable very much longer. Many of them were already unusable.

 

I guess I'm a little frustrated because, even as someone who tries to follow this sort of technology, I didn't realize just how fragile DVD+/-R discs apparantly are. Part of the selling point when DVD first came out was its longevity. I never quite expected the same degree of that with the recordable formats, but I don't recall seeing their relative lifespan discussed much at all, either.

 

Heck, when Blu-Ray or HD-DVD becomes the new standard, I'll willingly copy my 500 old discs onto 100 new ones to save storage space (assuming they're playable that way). But with how fast the technology is changing, it would be nice if the old media would at least last long enough to become obsolete before it disintegrates. VHS actually seems to have an advantage in this aspect.

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Some of my 25 year old video tapes are still in excellent condition. They seem to store well under all conditions.

 

But those were the old thick tapes. I think modern new tapes are thinner. I can tell by the weight. My 25 year old tapes are heavy, my new tapes are light weight.

 

Playing a tape will damage it. Especially when the player mechanism takes the tape into the machine and returns it to the cassette. So, playing a tape many times will shorten its lifespan.

 

DVD disk makers claim up to a 100 year lifespan, but that might not be true when the DVDs are played frequently.

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jarhfive: All good points. Some of the horror stories I've read recently (here and elsewhere) may have me feeling overly pessimistic at the moment. :) But no doubt all the factors you mentioned play into it.

 

I do question the probability of currently-unreadable DVDs being usable in the future, though. Even if it's possible, once the next technology takes over a few years from now, there's not likely to be much development on software for the old format. But hey, I've been wrong before.

 

Burnable CDs have been around for about a decade now, right? There must be some fairly good, real-world information on their shelf life, at least.

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kaplan,

 

That is an excellent point regarding "in with the new...out with the old".

 

So true...so true!

 

I cannot tell you how many times I have run into that situation at work. Sitting on the floor of my laboratory are 300 back-up 'streamer' tapes. Tapes may still be fine but, what is stored on them is unreadable (hardware long gone).

 

Why don't I do some housekeeping? I hate to 'displace' all those spiders and (did I see a couple of rodents take up residence?)...my furry friends.

 

Rusty

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