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My Favorite Trivia


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That's it.

 

Both Bette Davis and Alan Young are listed on several Christian Science websites as having at least made inquiries and/or followed the philosophy for a while. It appears that Christian Science was rather fashionable among Hollywood figures in the past; there are quite a few recognizable names listed. Edith Evans was indeed a lifelong adherent.

 

You're up, Ayres, if you like.

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That's it.

 

Both Bette Davis and Alan Young are listed on several Christian Science websites as having at least made inquiries and/or followed the philosophy for a while. It appears that Christian Science was rather fashionable among Hollywood figures in the past; there are quite a few recognizable names listed. Edith Evans was indeed a lifelong adherent.

 

You're up, Ayres, if you like.

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Merci.

 

This performer was the child of a teenage rape victim and grew up on the streets.

 

Had a nickname that indicated skinniness, but didn?t always stay that way.

 

As well known for dramatic work as for musical work.

 

Introduced onstage a great song that was later sung in the movies by another singer and co-star.

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Okay, now this one is SO EASY, I will be surprised if I don't receive half a dozen correct answers within the first hour. But I can't resist. The film maker was so clever with this one, I still marvel at his cunning.

 

What film's plot ENDS with this line:

 

"Zed's dead, baby. Zed's dead."

 

That is the FINAL line of the plot. What's the movie?

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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Bill, you are right... and you are WRONG.

 

Yes, there are an astounding number of "Zed" characters in the movies. But no, Zed Bascomb is not the one we are looking for.

 

Keep at it, though. You always come through, and my money's on you to figure this one out before 2007 is born.

 

Dan N.

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"Pulp Fiction (1994)

Butch: Zed's dead, baby. Zed's dead.

 

Turned out to be WAY too easy - just entered "Zed's dead" + quote, and voila!"

 

 

Told ya it would be easy. The only thing you had to concern yourselves with is my clue about the above line being the FINAL line of the film's plot.

 

As you know, "Pulp Fiction" is presented in non-linear fashion. There are three main stories in the movie, but they are not chronological. The "plot" of the film actually ends at the finish of the SECOND of the three segments. Therefore, Butch's comment to Fabienne is the final line of the PLOT.

 

Okay, Bill... Take it away!

 

Happy New Year!

 

Dan N.

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I've got one --- I think.

 

An Asian-American actor. A career spanning almost 50 years. In movies, very often played villains of a national background different from his own, or members of yet another national group, rarely did he get to play a character who reflected his real self. Only later in his career did he get to play characters of his own background more frequently, generally on TV. Always calm and dignified, always articulate, no matter what the role.

 

He holds a distinction in this country among members of his own "hyphenated" national group.

 

Who is this actor, and what is his "other" claim to fame?

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Hours have gone by, and no takers.

 

Here's another clue:

 

This actor was in countless war films, especially in the 1940s. He frequently had the same kind of scenes with American GIs, where he remarked on their surprise at his command of English, and told them that he was a graduate of one or another prestigious American university. He was all too often cast in roles which must have cost no small crisis of conscience for him to play, but which were considered part of the "war effort." Remember, he was Asian-American.

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Both good guesses, but both wrong.

 

This gentleman was on a very popular TV show of the 70s which featured many Asian-America actors, but he was never anyone's Number One (or Two) Son.

 

Remember that I've said although this gentleman was of Asian background, for most of his career he rarely got to play a character who was of the same "national origin" as himself. There was a reason for this, but it had more to do with politics than with casting. The distinction he holds has to do with this as well.

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