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My Favorite Trivia


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Correct!

 

Ahn was of Korean heritage, but for most of his career played either Chinese or Japanese characters. This was due in part to the fact that there was not a large Korean presence in the U.S., aside from the West Coast, so that there were not many Korean characters written into movie and TV stories. Even in Korean War movies, the bad guys were generally the Red Chinese. This changed with "MASH," of course, and Ahn was in several episodes of that program, as well as being on Hawaii Five-O. He was also one of the monks on "Kung Fu."

 

Ahn has the distinction of reputedly being the first American citizen born to a Korean couple in America. He was born in 1905, and his mother had been one of the first Korean women legally permitted into the country. His father was a well-regarded Korean artist. This was during the time of immigration laws that largely excluded Asian families from entering the country.

 

A most interesting and erudite man, was Mr. Phillip Ahn.

 

Got one, Bill?

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Asian actors on the TV version of M*A*S*H came from everywhere. A friend of mine, Patrick Adiarte, who's of Filipino descent, played the Korean boy "Ho-Jon" in several episodes of the show's first season (you may best remember Patrick as Prince Chulalongkorn in THE KING AND I).

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"Got one, Bill?

 

Nope - feel free, anyone."

 

OK. Here's one to fill the time a little.

 

I'm a red-headed actress who once played one of Bob Cratchit's children, but gained my greatest fame as a TV mom.

 

You're wrong. Try again.

 

CharlieT

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"You're wrong. Try again."

 

I knew this would be the first guess. That's why I gave the above answer. This actress fit the same scenario, so I knew it would be fun to ask it.

 

She appeared in her last movie in 1959. It is a well known coming-of-age film. The rest of her career was spent in TV or on Broadway. Her portrayal as a Cratchit child was a television appearance and was her first. It predated her movie career which consisted of 3 films.

 

Try again.

 

CharlieT

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Happy anniversary, Charlie!

 

Charlie, a couple of weeks ago I posted a question here that never got answered, and I deleted it after realizing it was posted to the wrong thread.

 

I'd like to test your collective wits with it again -- THIS would be the correct thread, except that the question has to do with television, not theatrical film. Would that be too d?class? for this board?

 

Dan N.

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Thanks for giving me the green light on this one, although it's a TELEVISION question. Nowadays most people do their viewing in front of TV sets anyway.

 

The question concerns the following three actors:

 

Leo Carrillo

Hume Cronyn

Lorne Greene

 

N.B.: Please note, the connection that these three gentlemen share is NOT unique. Several other actors have shared the same connection. But "several" does not mean "many." In other words, it is a fairly notable characteristic, not shared by many. In fact, I daresay it is NOT shared by ANYONE who is acting today.

 

What do the above three actors have in common?

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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"They all fought in World War II?"

 

 

If they all fought in World War II, good for them. But as I've said, this question is about television.

 

All three of the named actors were in TV shows. But when and in what kind?

 

There. Now I'm pretty sure you can all guess the answer.

 

Dan N.

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"Leo Carillo played Pancho in The Cisco Kid with Duncan Renaldo. Lorne Greene was in Bonanza. They were both filmed westerns. Could Hume Cronyn have been in a "live" presentation with a western motif?

 

CharlieT"

 

 

Charlie, so far you are the closest to divining the correct answer. But you don't have it yet.

 

What distinction connects these three actors:

 

Leo Carrillo

Hume Cronyn

Lorne Greene

 

Dan N.

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Does it have to do with their programs being broadcast in color? The Cisco Kid was done in color at some point, and Cronyn starred in a very early, live TV series that was broadcast in color. I know Bonanza was in color, but I'm not sure if Lorne Greene was in something even earlier that was in color.

 

?????

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I think Judith's answer is as close as we are going to get.

 

Leo Carrillo, Hume Cronyn, and Lorne Greene were all "pioneers" of a sort; they all co-starred in color TV series at a time when almost all of TV was in black and white.

 

Leo Carrillo was in "The Cisco Kid," which began in 1950 and is described as "the first all-color television series." The IMDb comment that it was in Black & White and color is incorrect. "The Cisco Kid" was always in color. (They may be confusing it with a Cisco movie that was in b&w.)

 

Hume Cronyn costarred (with Jessica Tandy) in "The Marriage" in 1954. It is described as "The first color prime time series on American network television." ("The Cisco Kid" was not a network show, it was produced -- lucratively -- for syndication.)

 

Lorne Greene costarred in "Bonanza," which began running on NBC in 1959, and is described as "the first color prime time WESTERN series on American network television." "The Cisco Kid" was a western, but not on a network; "The Marriage" was on NBC, but it was not a western... but never mind.

 

At a time when we all had black and white console TVs that we huddled around in the parlor, these shows were blazing the trail for a future in color.

 

Judith, I do believe it is your turn.

 

Dan N.

 

http://www.silentfilmguide.com

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