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mr6666

Flint, MI & poisoned water?

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How do we elect officials that will put the needs of the people above their own interests?

 By somehow enticing a better class of people into public office. How that's done is the million dollar question. Maybe a punch card good for a free soft drink after so many days in office without committing a crime of some sort?

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That's an interesting interactive map. My county is in the three lowest levels: 1, 2 and 3. - which happen to be the same for the areas surrounding Washington, D.C. where I grew up - that's reassuring. I notice Washington, D.C. itself on this map shows high risk levels (red areas). Perhaps that has something to do with the behavior of government officials at all levels. Actually, all the big cities on the east coast are red.. ouch.

:unsure:

Still, I do not ingest.   I drink, cook, and brush my teeth with filtered water.

 

.. or lead free gasoline.

[ just kidding ! ]

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Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder and other state officials are now the defendants in a federal racketeering lawsuit alleging that the water crisis in Flint is the direct result of an “intentional scheme” they concocted to cut costs and avoid filing bankruptcy.

The 17-count racketeer influenced and corrupt organizations ( Rico ) complaint was announced in a press conference on Wednesday.

 

http://winningdemocrats.com/finally-rick-snyder-and-400-other-flint-officials-named-in-racketeering-lawsuit/

 

:lol:

 

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Sounds like we have some new tenants for Guantanamo . Waterboarding, anybody?

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Sounds like we have some new tenants for Guantanamo . Waterboarding, anybody?

 

Waterboarding with Flint water, that would be poetic justice.

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:rolleyes:

 

Overheard gag about the whole thing....

 

"Sure.  Getting poison water in Flint is a lead pipe cinch!"  :lol:

 

Sepiatone

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:rolleyes:

 

Overheard gag about the whole thing....

 

"Sure.  Getting poison water in Flint is a lead pipe cinch!"  :lol:

 

Sepiatone

:lol: that's a good one!

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"The man who ran the city treatment plant and two state environmental officials were hit with felony charges Wednesday for allegedly misleading regulators about the poisoned water supply — and prosecutors promised more charges are coming.

 

Mike Glasgow was charged with tampering with evidence and willful neglect of duty for allegedly filing false reports to the state about water quality. Stephen Busch and Michael Prysby were charged with misconduct, evidence tampering, conspiracy and violations of the Safe Water Drinking Act for allegedly altering water test results."

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I suppose the old saying "Get the lead out" would be quite appropriate in this circumstance even though it usually means to speed things up! 

 

-----------------------------------------------

 

      Since this is a movie site I thought to mention 1 movie I know that was filmed in Flint, Michigan in 1967.  It is, unfortunately, a terrible movie.  I've seen it.  That said, NIGHT OF THE BLOODY TRANSPLANT (1968) is the only film I know of that was made in Flint, MI.  Lots of outside location work in the snow and ice.  Some truly •awful• lounge music acts filmed at a real-life nightclub to pad the meager running time.  ► It seems the entire film was built around some footage of (supposedly) real-life heart surgery.  Could be dodgy, though.  Who really knows?  I doubt the filmmakers cared.  I don't think anybody in this cast of amateurs was seen in another movie again. 

 

     I bought this years ago (the box art IS cool) in a United Home Video clamshell case.  I decided to keep the film -- bad as it is -- because it is a 'time capsule'.  The content of the movie isn't as important as the fact it's a filmed record of what Flint looked like in the winter of '67.  (I've always been fond of Michigan.  I had relatives who lived there and I visited them a number of times). 

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I suppose the old saying "Get the lead out" would be quite appropriate in this circumstance even though it usually means to speed things up! 

 

-----------------------------------------------

 

      Since this is a movie site I thought to mention 1 movie I know that was filmed in Flint, Michigan in 1967.  It is, unfortunately, a terrible movie.  I've seen it.  That said, NIGHT OF THE BLOODY TRANSPLANT (1968) is the only film I know of that was made in Flint, MI.  Lots of outside location work in the snow and ice.  Some truly •awful• lounge music acts filmed at a real-life nightclub to pad the meager running time.  ► It seems the entire film was built around some footage of (supposedly) real-life heart surgery.  Could be dodgy, though.  Who really knows?  I doubt the filmmakers cared.  I don't think anybody in this cast of amateurs was seen in another movie again. 

 

     I bought this years ago (the box art IS cool) in a United Home Video clamshell case.  I decided to keep the film -- bad as it is -- because it's a 'time capsule'.  The content of the movie isn't as important as the fact it's a filmed record of what Flint looked like in the winter of '67.  (I've always been fond of Michigan.  I had relatives who lived there and I visited them a number of times). 

 

Sounds like I need to drive up and raid your tape collection, Mr. Gorman.

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"Tea Party Republican Governor Paul LePage of Maine helped Nestlé secure a contract that gives Poland Springs, a Nestlé subsidiary, permission to take the small town of Fryeburg’s groundwater for the next 25 years for their own profit. The deal could stretch to 45 years due to built-in extensions.

Today that deal was upheld by Maine’s Supreme Judicial Court, essentially cutting off activists’ last attempts to scuttle the deal.

There has never been a contract that ties up local water resources for such a long period of time in American history. Water activists worry that this could set a precedent for future corporate attempts to take water from rural towns for extended periods of time...

 

Nestlé is infamous for taking water from US communities for billions of dollars in profit and then dumping the environmental costs onto the rest of society. Environmental scientist Vandana Shiva has called its practices “the most pervasive, most severe, and most invisible dimension of the ecological devastation of the earth.”

 

http://usuncut.com/news/nestle-water-deal-fryeburg-maine/

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"Tea Party Republican Governor Paul LePage of Maine helped Nestlé secure a contract that gives Poland Springs, a Nestlé subsidiary, permission to take the small town of Fryeburg’s groundwater for the next 25 years for their own profit. The deal could stretch to 45 years due to built-in extensions.

Today that deal was upheld by Maine’s Supreme Judicial Court, essentially cutting off activists’ last attempts to scuttle the deal.

There has never been a contract that ties up local water resources for such a long period of time in American history. Water activists worry that this could set a precedent for future corporate attempts to take water from rural towns for extended periods of time...

 

Nestlé is infamous for taking water from US communities for billions of dollars in profit and then dumping the environmental costs onto the rest of society. Environmental scientist Vandana Shiva has called its practices “the most pervasive, most severe, and most invisible dimension of the ecological devastation of the earth.”

 

 

Articles I read at pressherald.com and bangordailynews.com are somewhat different.  Nestle (Poland Spring) already has a contract with no time limits and no limts on amount of water it can withdraw.  New contract places a cap on amount of water and time limits, but also obtains $60,000 per year additional from Nestle for use of the one well it uses.

To me, the main issue would be the priorities in the event of a water shortage or incident.  Do residents, schools, public facilities and local businesses get first priority over Poland Springs?  Who decides?

If a company is going to make an investment or plans to continue one, they want some kind of resonable expectation that the resources will be available for some time to come.

Since Nestle has been doing this for quite some time, were there probelms in the past?  If so, what were they?

One caveat to this is that if the water authority is not permitted to make deals with large users/businesses, operating costs will be passed on the residents.  Therefore, they will see more frequent and larger increases in costs of their water.

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Can we run a water pipeline from Flint to Cleveland (just to the convention hall)?

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Can we run a water pipeline from Flint to Cleveland (just to the convention hall)?

 

I'll bet a Kickstarter campaign could raise the funds in about two days..

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They don't know what spilled into a Kentucky creek.  Someone too lazy to take a magic marker and write on the drum xxxxxx?

 

We don't know what leaked, only it's bad. :huh: 

 

 

If it had alcohol in it they'd know what it was..

 

Special Edition Bourbon my ***!

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