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Cinematographer Haskell Wexler has died


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Cinematographer Haskell Wexler has died. He was 93.

 

A five-time Oscar nominee, Wexler picked up two Academy Awards for his photography of BOUND FOR GLORY (1976) and WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF (1966). He received additional nominations for ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST (1975), MATEWAN (1987) and BLAZE (1989).

 

The Hollywood Reporter remembers Haskell Wexler here: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/haskell-wexler-dead-cuckoo-s-722103

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Cinematographer Haskell Wexler has died. He was 93.

 

A five-time Oscar nominee, Wexler picked up two Academy Awards for his photography of BOUND FOR GLORY (1976) and WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF (1966). He received additional nominations for ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST (1975), MATEWAN (1987) and BLAZE (1989).

 

The Hollywood Reporter remembers Haskell Wexler here: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/haskell-wexler-dead-cuckoo-s-722103

 

So sorry to hear about this! Wexler's first feature film as a writer-director, "Medium Cool" (1969), was a much-admired effort. It starred Robert Forster as a television cameraman who covers the catastrophic 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. Wexler photographed the movie, too.

 

 

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When cinematographer Néstor Almendros and camera operator John Bailey had to leave for another project, Wexler took over the photographic duties for Terrence Malick's praiseworthy 1978 drama "Days of Heaven." Almendros won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography, but Wexler's contributions were effective and seamless. 

 

One unforgettable segment he worked on involved a battle against invading locusts that threatened Texas wheat fields.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fLLQ2LIyDM0

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I've always loved the look (and sound) of "American Graffiti" (1973), George Lucas' first major screen success. So it doesn't surprise me that his friend Haskell Wexler served as a "visual consultant" for the production.

 

 

 

 

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