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Any Gary Cooper Fans?


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HollywoodGolightly

 

The thing is the ending of the sound version lacks the emotional punch of the Original Silent. I liked the 1939 version, but it seemed a rather watered down take on the story. In the Coleman film Noah Beery's Sergeant Lejaune re-named Markoff in the Cooper version, is truly an evil and menacing figure.Many of his soldiers are scared to death of him, and live in constant fear of the guy. I didn't see that in the re-make. Brian Donlevy's character was a Pussycat by comparison.

 

And wasn't Micheal "Beau" Geste supposed to be an Englishmen? What is the story on his not having a British accent in the film? In the Silent, Beau always called his brother John "Stout Fellow" a very English Nick-Name. This was a key element throughout the story. In the '39 version, that is ignored. BEAU GESTE (1926) is a major, major Silent film that is almost never seen. If it were at least in circulation, it would probably find itself on allot of top 10 Silents lists. It is that good.

 

 

 

21photoplayedition.jpg

 

 

beaugestecard.png

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> {quote:title=coopsgirl wrote:}{quote}

> Here's an article one of Gary's college friends wrote about their college experiences from Dec 1930. I'm just posting the links to conserve a little space.

>

coopsgirl - that was interesting - *freshman pajama parade?* I was at a college fair in the spring and tables were set up for different colleges. I spotted Grinnell College at one and went over and asked them if anyone famous in show biz went there (I wasn't sure where I had heard the name Grinnell before). The representatives asked me if I was thinking of Herbie Hancock, who graduated from there. Then I mentioned Gary Cooper and a light went on in their heads.

Funny that they wouldn't let him in their acting club.

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> {quote:title=gagman66 wrote:}{quote}

> HollywoodGolightly,

>

> I just didn't expect Coop to sound like him came from Kansas in this picture? Did you watch the clips? What did you think?

 

To be honest, I sometimes forget all about accents making sense, at least if a movie is entertaining enough. It's a lot worse when the movie isn't so good, like with Kevin Costner sounding like a California dude when playing Robin Hood.

 

The clips of the silent Beau Geste look pretty amazing. I can see why you think the movie would be in the top 10 of silent movies if it were more widely seen, I hope the day will come when TCM can show it.

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HollywoodGolightly,

 

I am not all that sure who holds the copyright to the Silent *BEAU GESTE?* Is it Paramount or is it Universal? I ask this because some Paramount Silents like the 1929 *THE FOUR FEATHERS* with Richard Arlen and Fay Wray are now owned by Universal. Since there was a sound remake in 1939 from Paramount and Universal now has that copyright, maybe they actually have the 1926 version too? If Universal has it, they had no reason not to include it as an extra with the new release of the 1939 film, At least not other than there being no recorded score that is.

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Paramount should still own the rights to the silent *Beau Geste*. Universal has the bulk of the Paramount films from '29-'49 and Paramount still owns everything previous to '29 which would include their silents.

 

There are a few individual exceptions though as one of Gary's early films *I Take This Woman* from 1931 is actually in private ownership. It was based on a novel and the author's family currently hold the rights to it and there are no copies of this one circulating around so unfortunately it may be one we never see.

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It is funny that the school?s drama club wouldn?t take him. At least they later made him an honorary member. He was in a drama class and his teacher noted on his report card ?shows no progress?. I bet that guy was surprised years later when Gary won his first Oscar! From what so many people have said though, when you watched him in person, it didn?t look like he was doing much and directors often thought he was ruining their pictures. Then they would look at the rushes and see what a great job he was doing. He was definitely a film actor as his style of acting just didn?t project enough for the stage.

 

About the pajama parade, I?ve got a wonderful image in my head of a tall, gangly freshman (who would have been about 20 since his hip injury kept him out of school for a while causing him to finish later) running down the street in his jammies while the older students spanked him ? crazy stuff! My freshman year of college, I entered a sorority (it was for band students and it was great) and we had some weird (but safe and fun) things we had to go through too. I can imagine going through college in the 20s must have a been a lot of fun as the culture was changing with more of an emphasis on youth and more and more people were going to college and being away from home for the first time. I bet it was crazy!

 

I sent you a PM too.

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Angie,

 

Up until only a couple months ago, I was not aware that Universal had the rights to the 1929 *THE FOUR FEATHERS.* I thought that it was Paramount who did? So that was a surprise. I colorized these two photos for you. Did you get the E-mail about the Silent version of *TRUE TO THE NAVY?*

 

 

 

Jeannine-AndPhilip-CoopAndColleen_e.jpg

 

 

 

 

ClaraBow-AFineCatch.png

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Those are cute! I did get your email. I know that for a while, studios released silent versions of some of their talkies since theaters were still making the transition to sound but I didn?t know that one was released that way.

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> {quote:title=gagman66 wrote:}{quote}

> HollywoodGolightly,

>

> I am not all that sure who holds the copyright to the Silent *BEAU GESTE?* Is it Paramount or is it Universal?

 

IMHO, it shouldn't even matter which studio currently owns the rights. If they are unable or unwilling to release it through their own home video divisions, they could license it to someone else for a video release. Both Universal and Paramount have licensed their movies to Criterion, for example.

 

It makes me sad when the studios turn their back on their own history, because it is thanks to those movies that they flourished.

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HollywoodGolightly,

 

 

Really though one of those studios has the copyright, that's all they have. The materials are held by archives. So a simple go ahead from Paramount should be enough to get a project going. Not costing them much of anything.

 

I'm trying to find information if any of the Two-Color Technicolor footage of the 1926 BEAU GESTE still exists or not? It did have Technicolor scenes. Have you voted for a DVD release on the TCM Movie Data Base?

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coopsgirl:

You mentioned the 1931 Gary Cooper feature "I Take This Woman" and said that it may be one that we never see. I have seen it, so it is around. I saw it at The Film Forum in New York a few years ago. It was a nice 35mm print. Not sure where they got the print from: Paramount, Universal, or the author's family. The situation about the ownership and how rare it is was explained in the program notes.

 

With two major stars: Gary Cooper and Carole Lombard in it, one would think that somebody would want to arrange to make this movie available so everyone can finally get to see it.

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HollywoodGolightly,

 

Warner's doesn't have any original negatives either in it's own vaults. They are all at George Eastman House. They may have allot of Safety-Stock transfers, but the negatives and Nitrate prints are kept elsewhere.

 

With WINGS for example the LOC has a print, AMPAS has another print, and Photoplay Productions too. All three have done their independent restorations. However, every print of WINGS has as it's source a Safety-Stock transfer made from a somewhat battered old Nitrate print found back in 1965. For a number of years before than, WINGS was considered a lost film. I don't know if Paramount actually has any prints at all atl? The original negatives are long since gone.

 

What amazes me is just how many Clara Bow features have been restored in recent years, but almost none of them are on DVD? I mean where is the restored 35 millimeter MANTRAP (1926)? It was directed by Victor Fleming for crying out loud. Why are there only poor bootlegs from 2nd and third generation 16 millimeter dupes, in circulation? The restored MANTRAP just had a couple live screenings a few months ago.

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The print is still around like you said, I'm just not sure if it will ever get a dvd release or not or be screened on tv since anyone who wanted to distribute it would have to go through the private owner and I don't know if that's more difficult than a studio but it seems like it might be tricky. I'm glad you got to see it. Did you enjoy it?

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Angie,

 

Yes, it's ROUGH HOUSE ROSIE. I have two larger versions. One somewhat larger, and the other extremely large. Stupidly, I shrank the photo to this size before colorization. All I was thinking of was the new size limitations here. Anyway, I will send you the larger images.

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