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The Spanish War Of 1936-1939 ...


Palmerin
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... is being commemorated today, 4 January 2016.

Why today? That war started on 17 July 1936 and ended on 1 April 1939.

 

Hmmmm...I'm stumped too here Palmerin, although refresh my memory about all this if you will.

 

Now first, THIS was during a time when the Republicans(Spanish in THIS case of course) were the GOOD guys, RIGHT?!

 

(...and secondly, Generalissimo Francisco Franco IS still dead, isn't HE???)

 

;)

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My guess is that, since the 2000 hours movie is FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS, TCM decided that it would be appropriate to garnish the occasion with other movies about the same event.

That, however, leads to the question of why the Hemingway story is being presented today of all days; EMH's birthday is not until 21 July.

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This IS really all much ado about nothing....

 

What if they just decided to showcase the films today without any reason?

 

That would be lame--every bit as lame as the chanzas=jests of the John Belushi--Chevy Chase era of SNL.

When I say that American ,,humor'' is often incomprehensible to me, it's shows like SNL that  I have in mind.

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That would be lame--every bit as lame as the chanzas=jests of the John Belushi--Chevy Chase era of SNL.

When I say that American ,,humor'' is often incomprehensible to me, it's shows like SNL that I have in mind.

This is the second time recently that you've posted about "American" humor that you don't get. What comedy do you enjoy? Maybe then we can see where you're coming from.

 

I'll also state that I've always thought comedy was the most subjective genre, and the hardest to critique. I mean, if it makes you laugh, it's funny to you. Who am I to say you're wrong for laughing?

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That would be lame--every bit as lame as the chanzas=jests of the John Belushi--Chevy Chase era of SNL.

When I say that American ,,humor'' is often incomprehensible to me, it's shows like SNL that  I have in mind.

 

Ah...HA! So THIS explains why I haven't received a "like" from you after all of my little "Generalissimo Francisco Franco" references in this baby of yours, EH Palmerin?!!!

 

(...well, NOW I'll at least know not to ever mention any "Land Shark" OR "Samurai Night Fever" references in any of your FUTURE threads, dude!!!)

 

;)

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Several of you discovered something about the Spanish Civil War today that you probably would not have discovered had TCM scheduled these films for another day. That was TCM's ulterior motive. They want to be known as the "teaching channel" (well, not in regards to wine, though). So they purposely showed films on an irrelevant date to make you do research, because, since all of us here are human (okay, most of us), we are curious by nature. We want to check, recheck, and check again.

 

Now here is a little-known fact I just learned about the Spanish Civil War. The two opposing generals were named Robert E. Lopez and Ulysses S. Gonzalez.

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This is the second time recently that you've posted about "American" humor that you don't get. What comedy do you enjoy? Maybe then we can see where you're coming from.

 

I'll also state that I've always thought comedy was the most subjective genre, and the hardest to critique. I mean, if it makes you laugh, it's funny to you. Who am I to say you're wrong for laughing?

 

Back in PR I laughed at everything, even at stuff which I now realize is terribly inane. That all changed when I moved to FL; I still appreciate such things as the wisecracks that are included as comedy relief in adventure movies, but too few straight comedies of today measure up to the classics shown on TCM. SOME LIKE IT HOT is still effective, but ANIMAL HOUSE impressed me only for the enormousness of its bad taste and crudity.

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The closest relation that I can find between 4 January and the SCW is the decisive Catalonia Offensive, which started on Dec 1938 and concluded on Feb 1939. The Nationalists drove the Republican government out of Barcelona, and delivered the death blow to the Republican side, which was now too demoralized to continue fighting.

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Did they find Franco alive still? He sure took a long time dying which might be what they are celebrating since he seemed to be dying for over a year but of course not in the 1930's. He might be like that show on the History Channel called "Hunting Hitler". He probably went undercover to New Jersey or such. 

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Did they find Franco alive still? He sure took a long time dying which might be what they are celebrating since he seemed to be dying for over a year but of course not in the 1930's. He might be like that show on the History Channel called "Hunting Hitler". He probably went undercover to New Jersey or such. 

 

Actually CG, the latest word on THIS front is that he might be working as a greeter at the Walmart in Placentia California, and otherwise known by the locals as "The City of the Afterbirth".

 

(...yeah, evidently there's a lot of dyslexic people there too)

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What reason will RO give for this evening dedicated to the War of 1936-39? Judging from the comments here, nobody is interested in the subject.

There doesn't need to be a reason for every series of films TCM puts together.  Following the Spanish Civil War series, there are a bunch of films about doctors -- mostly, but not exclusively female.

 

Regarding the Spanish Civil War series, they forgot to program Confidential Agent. I would have liked to see that expression on Katina Paxinou's face, when she pushes Wanda Hendrix out of the window. They also forgot to program The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie:

 

Miss Brodie: "By the way she died, Mary McGregor illumined her life. She died a heroine."

 

Sandy: "She died a fool."

 

Miss Brodie: "Joining her brother to fight for Franco... Wasn't that just like Mary?"

 

Sandy: "Her brother is fighting for the other side! ... Her brother is fighting for the Republicans! Mary McGregor was headed for the wrong army!"

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I was afraid of this: the host is not Osborne, but Mankiewicz. True to his established character, BM proceeded with shallow non-commentary that did not explain at all why the evening of 4 Jan 2016 is dedicated to movies about the SCW. I suspect this is a ploy to sucker the TV public into watching the entire evening in the hope of finally learning the answer to that mystery.

So, in case you have to get up early tomorrow 5 Jan 2016, here is that answer: January and February of 2016 is the 80th anniversary of the decisive Catalonia Offensive, which finally broke the back of the Spanish Republic. It was a tremendous battle, comparable to the Siege of Petersburg, where Grant finally forced Lee to give up Richmond.

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I was afraid of this: the host is not Osborne, but Mankiewicz. True to his established character, BM proceeded with shallow non-commentary that did not explain at all why the evening of 4 Jan 2016 is dedicated to movies about the SCW. I suspect this is a ploy to sucker the TV public into watching the entire evening in the hope of finally learning the answer to that mystery.

So, in case you have to get up early tomorrow 5 Jan 2016, here is that answer: January and February of 2016 is the 80th anniversary of the decisive Catalonia Offensive, which finally broke the back of the Spanish Republic. It was a tremendous battle, comparable to the Siege of Petersburg, where Grant finally forced Lee to give up Richmond.

 

WAIT now, Palmerin!

 

I thought RICH had already established that the generals in question here were named "Lopez" and "Gonzales"?!!! AND that SOMEHOW some old myth about the former crapping in the milk of the LATTER was just THAT...a freakin' MYTH?!!!

 

(...man oh man...would you people PLEASE get your damn stories straight around here???!!!) 

 

;)

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Hmmmm...I'm stumped too here Palmerin, although refresh my memory about all this if you will.

 

Now first, THIS was during a time when the Republicans(Spanish in THIS case of course) were the GOOD guys, RIGHT?!

 

(...and secondly, Generalissimo Francisco Franco IS still dead, isn't HE???)

 

;)

"...and his condition is not expected to improve."

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my post yesterday alerting everyone that FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS was coming on for what seemed to be the first time in ages "withered on the vine" and died, so I guess I'll post my thoughts on the movie here.

 

It was lovely to look at- but for such moments of beauty and scenery, the film ultimately had something of a claustrophobic feel to it- so much of it ends up talking place in caves and cramped settings and tight close-ups and darkness.

 

Bergman's flashback scenes to what happened to her village were really well done and her performance was (as always) superb, although I was surprised at how little screen time she ultimately had (it was really a large supporting part.) She ended up pulling off the hair.

 

Akim Tamiroff is, as always, fabulous. He always reminds me a little of Boris Badanov and I love him for it.

 

Katina Paxinou impressed me as a Spanish Guerilla-style Madame DeFarge-meets- Maragret Hamilton sort of character who may as well have ended her every line of dialogue with "YOU FEELTHY PEEG!" She could've been too much, and she almost eats the movie alive; but her performance works and I get the Oscar (in many ways she is more the lead in the film than Bergman.) 

 

...which kind of segues us into the reason my attention wavered and I ended up doing a few chores whilst the film was on: Gary Cooper was really bad in this.

 

Now mind you, I'm not in one Cooper Camp or another- I think he's a fine actor who gave at least one truly great performance (in BALL OF FIRE) and one very admirable salvage job (THE FOUNTAINHEAD)- enough that I know he had "the stuff."

 

But ohmahgah, he sucks in this movie.

 

Just stilted, flat, monotonous recitation. No fire. Nothing beneath the surface; and I wonder if that was something that the director demanded he do- that he pull a sort of proto-ZHIVAGO style non-performance to make the lead all the more heroic, which there is really no need to do. It also could not have been easy for him working against three pasionate, aggressive foreign actors who were gnawing at their roles like NylaBone chew toys.

 

Maybe it was story-dictated? Maybe Hemingway (with whom Cooper was a good friend) said he thought the role should be played devoid of emotion (and again, one could take this approach and still not come across as underwhelmingly as Cooper does in this.)

 

I know Cooper's "thing" was to seem like he wasn't really trying, but I think he takes it too far with this one.

It is almost an anti-performance.

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Something to ponder about:

the period from 14 April 1931--proclamation of the Second Republic--to 1 April 1939--end of the SCW--is the Spanish equivalent of the French Revolution, which would make Franco the Sp equivalent of Napoleon I.

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I watched TCM'S presentations of both "Behold A Pale Horse" and "The Angel Wore Red" last night, and found it interesting in how each movie depicted the overt repressions perpetrated upon the Spanish populace by each side during and after their civil war 

 

Both films seemed to move at a glacial pace(especially "Behold The Funny Hats the Spanish Cops Wear"...oops sorry, I mean "...A Pale Horse"), and I found Gregory Peck's performance as the exiled Spanish Republican fighter to be rather stiff(yeah yeah, I know...we're talkin' Greg Peck here, so what did I expect, huh), but whenever Tony Quinn as the ruthless and calculating Francoist police captain was on screen, I was reminded of how he could so well inhabit his film characters. Omar Sharif(with those big puppy eyes of his) was also excellent as the weary young priest who finds himself embroiled in the action.(once again, the glacially paced action)

 

And next and while watching "The Angel Wore Red", I was mildly shocked to see the Spanish Republican government being presented as much or even more repressive and brutal as any of the films one might see depicting the later Franco-led dictatorship.

 

(...aaah, but then I'd just look at beautiful Ava, and all of my concerns would instantly be assuaged)  

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I watched TCM'S presentations of both "Behold A Pale Horse" and "The Angel Wore Red" last night, and found it interesting in how each movie depicted the overt repressions perpetrated upon the Spanish populace by each side during and after their civil war 

 

Both films seemed to move at a glacial pace(especially "Behold The Funny Hats the Spanish Cops Wear"...oops sorry, I mean "...A Pale Horse"), and I found Gregory Peck's performance as the exiled Spanish Republican fighter to be rather stiff(yeah yeah, I know...we're talkin' Greg Peck here, so what did I expect, huh), but whenever Tony Quinn as the ruthless and calculating Francoist police captain was on screen, I was reminded of how he could so well inhabit his film characters. Omar Sharif(with those big puppy eyes of his) was also excellent as the weary young priest who finds himself embroiled in the action.(once again, the glacially paced action)

 

And next and while watching "The Angel Wore Red", I was mildly shocked to see the Spanish Republican government being presented as much or even more repressive and brutal as any of the films one might see depicting the later Franco-led dictatorship.

 

(...aaah, but then I'd just look at beautiful Ava, and all of my concerns would instantly be assuaged)  

 

Very glad that the subject interested you.

Would you agree that the 1931-39 period was an Spanish ,,French Revolution''? People frequently overlook that the Napoleonic Era was a sequel to the Revolution of 1789.

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