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Elvis Presley 81st birthday tribute.


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You know, DGF it was years before I realized that the moniker Chubby Checker was a take-off of the name Fats Domino.

 

Fats sure was a lot more talented than the Chubster fer shure!

 

In Elvis appreciation, I tend to like Early Elvis more than Middle Elvis and Late Elvis but all three genres can be fun to watch.

I think that the MOST talented of the early rockers may have been Eddie Cochran, but his early tragic death denied him the opportunity to really prove it.

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One final note:  I will admit to a certain amount of bitterness with regards to Elvis;  This is because when I see his early work I'm very impressed.   I just feel he had great abilities that he didn't develop to their full potential.   

You got that exactly right, my friend.

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You know, DGF it was years before I realized that the moniker Chubby Checker was a take-off of the name Fats Domino.

 

Fats sure was a lot more talented than the Chubster fer shure!

 

In Elvis appreciation, I tend to like Early Elvis more than Middle Elvis and Late Elvis but all three genres can be fun to watch.

MAYBE CaveGirl, you may be familiar with another ealry '50's piano player/R&B singer who went by the professional name of "Popcorn" Wylie, who also bore a strong resemblance to Fats, both in appearance and sound.  We're familiar with him here due to his being a Detroit native!  :)  Just as was HANK BALLARD who with back-up vocal group THE MIDNIGHTERS had a hit with a tune called "Teardrops On Your Letter"  which had, on it's "B" side, a "throw-away" tune called "The Twist", which became of course, CHUBBY CHECKERS biggest claim to fame! B)

 

Sepiatone

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Sepia, I've not heard of Mr. Popcorn to my shame!

 

Not to muddy the waters further here about who are the heroes of rock and roll, I do have to say that the more one reads the more one starts to realize that many heroes have some instances of feet of clay. Not to dispute their talents but even someone like Chuck Berry has his detractors who say he stole the style of his playing from his piano man, Johnny Johnson and even some songs. Johnson supposedly was never one to make a fuss, but just like Dylan and the authorship issues over "Blowin' in the Wind" these things get confusing.

 

I'm sure every rock and roller might at one time have copped something from another performer. For a really fun expose of originators of rock and roll legendary thingies, get the book called "Unknown Legends of Rock and Roll, wherein the author highlights many things people like even Jimmy Page may have somewhat stolen and made their own:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Unknown-Legends-Rock-n-Roll/dp/0879305347

 

I guess all artists owe a bit to those who came before and some just happen to be in the right place at the right time. I mean, "Rocket 88" did not make its performer a big star yet it definitely started things.

Personally I vote for Bo Diddley as a true originator but he probably got those beats from listening to The Hot Club of France with Django.

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Sepia, I've not heard of Mr. Popcorn to my shame!

 

Not to muddy the waters further here about who are the heroes of rock and roll, I do have to say that the more one reads the more one starts to realize that many heroes have some instances of feet of clay. Not to dispute their talents but even someone like Chuck Berry has his detractors who say he stole the style of his playing from his piano man, Johnny Johnson and even some songs. Johnson supposedly was never one to make a fuss, but just like Dylan and the authorship issues over "Blowin' in the Wind" these things get confusing.

 

I'm sure every rock and roller might at one time have copped something from another performer. For a really fun expose of originators of rock and roll legendary thingies, get the book called "Unknown Legends of Rock and Roll, wherein the author highlights many things people like even Jimmy Page may have somewhat stolen and made their own:

 

 

I guess all artists owe a bit to those who came before and some just happen to be in the right place at the right time. I mean, "Rocket 88" did not make its performer a big star yet it definitely started things.

 

Personally I vote for Bo Diddley as a true originator but he probably got those beats from listening to The Hot Club of France with Django.

 

Anyone that claims to be a guitar player stole something from Django.    His bending of notes, on an acoustic guitar,  are legendary.

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Sepia, I've not heard of Mr. Popcorn to my shame!

 

Not to muddy the waters further here about who are the heroes of rock and roll, I do have to say that the more one reads the more one starts to realize that many heroes have some instances of feet of clay. Not to dispute their talents but even someone like Chuck Berry has his detractors who say he stole the style of his playing from his piano man, Johnny Johnson and even some songs. Johnson supposedly was never one to make a fuss, but just like Dylan and the authorship issues over "Blowin' in the Wind" these things get confusing.

 

I'm sure every rock and roller might at one time have copped something from another performer. For a really fun expose of originators of rock and roll legendary thingies, get the book called "Unknown Legends of Rock and Roll, wherein the author highlights many things people like even Jimmy Page may have somewhat stolen and made their own:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Unknown-Legends-Rock-n-Roll/dp/0879305347

 

I guess all artists owe a bit to those who came before and some just happen to be in the right place at the right time. I mean, "Rocket 88" did not make its performer a big star yet it definitely started things.

 

Personally I vote for Bo Diddley as a true originator but he probably got those beats from listening to The Hot Club of France with Django.

Anyone with a name as bland as "Johnny Johnson" deserves to remain in the background.

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Funny, but I was always under the impression that the..ahem.."crossroads" of 3 chord R&R and the earliest influences of it came from The Blues and not Jazz, and from a certain artist know as Robert Johnson (1911-1938).

 

(...have I been mistaken in this belief all this time?)

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Funny, but I was always under the impression that the..ahem.."crossroads" of 3 chord R&R and the earliest influences of it came from The Blues and not Jazz, and from a certain artist know as Robert Johnson (1911-1938).

 

(...have I been mistaken in this belief all this time?)

You...mistaken? Never!

 

I have both of the Robert Johnson retrospective albums and of course he was a major force behind the styling but loads of guitarists will mention Django as an influence. He was rather revolutionary with his fire-seared hand, in his influential fingering and playing. Also someone like big bander Eddie Condon. I thin one can even find rock influences in 1920's bands like those of Jean Goldkette, who had Bix Beiderbecke playing with him at that time. It all ends up an amalgam of styles which came together. Dick Dale even had some I think Armenian influences that made for his unique sound.

 

Just checked, Dick Dale was using Lebanese sounds in some of his surf guitar recordings.

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