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rich

Favorite War Movies

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albatros1, I did realize that Bendix wasn't in Battleground after I hit "post message".

Attack is still a great film but the ending does get me **** at William Smithers(first film role) That he has to be soooo honest. Eddie Albert finest role (maybe) Favorite line: I'll take this grenade and shove it down your throat and pull the pin"

vallo

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Another film that shows the perspective of war through the eyes of a young boy, is Spielberg's 'Empire Of The Sun', which came out the same year as 'Hope and Glory'.

 

If anyone is curious, the hymn sung in 'Empire Of The Sun' is an old Welsh hymn called Suo Gan. I was whistling this tune for days after I saw the movie.

 

Regards

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Speaking of great war series, Band of Brothers was one of the finest. Not only well done, but especially because it depicted real people from their points of view.

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vallo13, I agree with you about the ending of Attack. You know how movies are. They had to show the idealistic instead of the realistic ending.

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Although well done showing the American Infantry Soldier, the only real people were the Americans, The Germans were right out of the TV series Combat. This has always been the flaw in most American war movies and until recently, documentaries. The series, Battlefield, made for PBS presented a honest picture of all sides. Probably the main reason Ryan's book, The Last Battle was never made. A outstanding book painting a realistic picture of the Allies and the Axis.

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That's because Band of Brothers is from the points of view of the soldiers, and that's how they (and the rest of the military/country) saw the enemy. Most war movies stem from that view because even though the soldiers on the other side are just doing their jobs, to put them in a morally relativistic light would be suicide. So in that vein, this point of view is perhaps the most honest, because this is a rare occurrence where the events are solely based on direct individual accounts of what happened. The portrayal of the Germans is accurate in this movie because it's based on these men's contact and interaction with the Germans, not a screen writer's ideal of what the Germans were like. It even shows these soldiers of both sides being friendly after the war is over, and working together at roadside checkpoints.

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Thanks for the correction for my mistake in my message, which I meant to say was Objective Burma with Errol Flynn, as I am a real fan of his and just corresponded with his grandson Luke Flynn, a great guy and actor as well. I also stand corrected for my error in 30 Seconds Over Tokyo and I guess when you become one of the DAV Over The Hill Gang with too much metal rolling around in his head maybe I can get a pass this time. Was hit by lightning in the Nam in Tuy Hoa in 66 and woke up in Yokohama and didn't know who I was for awhile, so please forgive the old brain matter once and awhile. My Pop who flew for Eastern Airlines introduced me to World War 1 Ace Eddie Rickenbacker, like your experience, was something i'll always remember as well. Now I am just praying and hoping for the safe return of all our troops in Iraq and Afghanistan as well. Good luck and best wishes, Rich

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Viva Ted Turner for all of the movie treasures that he has been able to save and show to us every day and I only hope someday I can personally thank him, which I believe many other fans share in my feelings with in the same way. >

 

What Ted began, George Feltenstein and crew have picked up the mantle and carried it gloriously and fruitfully into the breach of the WBros vaults.

 

All Hail!!!

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No particular order, NONE of the newer films can hold a candle to these wonderful films >>

 

The Great Raid which was a Miramax release and didn't get the release it deserved because of the Weinstein/Disney divorce is a great old fashioned war story/film that is now available on DVD.

 

Highly recommend it for lovers of WW2 movies.

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Matt,

 

Wanted to let you know that the team that brought Band of Brothers to HBO is working on a similar series based on the War in the Pacific Theatre.

 

Should be ready in 2008, I think.

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Saw that movie and loved it. Was very Oscar worthy in most categories, and was snubbed. It didn't get enough publicity and only made about 10 million towards its 60 million cost. I thought Joseph Fiennes should have been nominated, and also the actress who played his lover, definitely. There were also some good character actors in it.

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I saw that movie "the great raid" taken from the book "Some Survived" by lawton. I'm looking at the book on my shelf. I much enjoyed the book over the movie, but your right for modern day that was a good production.

Being a busted up Vietnam vet (disabled now) , I like the entertainment value of a movie more than how "realistic" Speilberg can make a bullet tearing through flesh sound. Just doesn't do anything for me. I like the love scenes and the way they blend so many characters into the old movies and when a guy dies in combat, it's ok with me if he just slumps over.

Another good book is "Flags of our Fathers" James Bradley, about Iwo Jima and "the Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors"... all great reading.

I appreciate your comments...

jerry c

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Logical,

 

Clint Eastwood is either in production or post production on "Flag" as we speak.

 

Matt,

 

I think the Weinstein/Miramax/Disney divorce was the major screw-up in the release of "Raid". It was a good movie that should not have sat on the shelf and was worthy of much better marketing than being dumped into the late summer doldrums as an afterthought because the Weinsteins had moved on. Disney wanted to dump the remaining Miramax product from the Weinstein regime in what amounted to the cinematic equivalent of a fire sale and a good film got lost in the ensuing flames.

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"Wanted to let you know that the team that brought Band of Brothers to HBO is working on a similar series based on the War in the Pacific Theatre."

 

Thanks, I didn't know that. My mother's uncle, on her mother's side, was in the Battle of the Bulge. Her uncles on her father's side were in the Pacific Theatre, so I can't wait for that. I have a lot of WWII letters of her uncles' and my grandfather's, including V-Mail and Marine Christmas cards from Japan. I have to laugh when I read them sometimes, because there are sentences like, "Gee, our drill instructor is a swell guy!" Great stuff.

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Rich, Yes I can understand those days when the brain isn't clicking quite, I have many days like that. I lived in Columbus for thirty years and a good friend worked for one of the local radio stations, so when ever he was going to meet and interview someone I was interested in, he would take me along. Two of those occasions allowed me to meet Captain "Eddie" and Colonel Paul Tibbets. That's how I attended the Doolittle Raiders Reunion as mentioned before.

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Yes I understand your point. The people who see Band of Brothers, and know nothing else and that will probably be the majority if you read the latest studies done on how little Americans know of their own history, will form a opinion of Germans soldiers of WWII, in keeping with film. A good friend, who was stationed in Germany just after the war, married a German girl. On one of the visits to there house, his bother-in-law was there. He fought on the Russian Front. The stories he told were hard to believe. There was a point of view of a soldier. One most Americans will never see. During the war, there was a German POW camp located close to my home town. A number of the prisoners stayed in America after the war and I got to know one of them. He was a officer serving onboard a submarine. I remember him wearing those Bavarian Shorts in the summertime, long before men showed their legs in my town. What a terrific guy. Why wouldn't he be. He was very much like the thirty million Americans of German ancestry.

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My favorite war movies:

 

The Patriot

 

Glory

 

They Died With Their Boots On

 

Well, you didn't specify which war.

 

CharlieT

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Was he a POW or was he in an internment camp? The Japanese only made up for 50% of the internment camps, and the other half was made up of Germans and Italians that had been living here. There was an Italian POW facility in East Boston during the war. Figures they'd send them to the Italian side of town ... the women used to bring food for them everyday. They must have been the best fed prisoners in the war.

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MattHelm,

 

Going through my father's coin collection a few months ago (father is long deceased), I found a token from an internment camp--1 cent.

 

I have found almost nothing (and buddy, I have searched) about internment camp tokens.

 

Oh, the only camp they were used was the (very large) Crystal City internment camp in Texas. Used at one of two camp "stores"--either the "German General" or the "Japanese Union". The token made of fiber ('feels' like a soft metal). A post-war "I.N.S." effort to destroy all tokens. Note the camp housed naturalized Germans and Italians...and a few Peruvians! (Japanese ancestors). Internment camp was run by the Department of Justice--Immigration and Naturalization Service.

 

Hey...not bad for "almost no information".

 

Anyway. You mentioned "internment camps". My question--what's the token value...$$$-wise?

 

Rusty

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I just want to thank everyone for this thread. My husband is a big war film buff, and I have gotten some really great ideas for gifts for him from this thread. I've been reading a lot of the titles out loud and there are some he had totally forgotten about.

 

So thanks!

 

And to the original poster, I agree---viva Ted Turner!

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Oh and has anyone here seen Europa Europa? It's not a classic film in that it's not exactly old (1990, I think?) but I thought it was pretty powerful. I don't normally get into war movies much, but I did like that one.

 

And would Slaughterhouse Five be considered a war movie?

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It was POW camp or at least that's what was on the back of their shirts and jackets. Wasn't most of the Japanese Camps in the west? Same thing with the POW's in my town. They were always treated in a friendly fashion. I remember when they were doing some work along a road or highway, that wives and daughters would take them some food and refreshments. Is it any wonder so many wanted to stay in America after the war. When you saw them as just people, it was easy to make the connection that they were sons, husbands and fathers, just as our loved ones were in their country. People hoped that somehow the treatment would be repaid to those in Axis POW camps. Of course the Germans couldn't provide full rations to their own troops so POW's were on really short rations. Better than what our POW's suffered at the hands of the Japanese. I forget exactly what the statistics were but I think the return rate of POWs from Europe were over 80% while it was 40% or less from the Japanese camps. Treatment of Anglo-American prisoners by the Japanese, was more in line with what was going on at Nazi concentration camps rather than POW camps.

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Back to the trend topic: another of my favorite war movies, The Purple Plain with Gregory Peck and the some of the best flying scenes of the British Mosquito. Too bad it isn't shown much. It's been several years since I saw it last.

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